Top Biden aide Ron Klain insists they had no idea the Taliban would take Afghanistan so soon

White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain CONTINUES to Insist They Had No Idea The Taliban Would Take Over Afghanistan So Soon And Blames Trump For Strengthening The Taliban

  • Ron Klain defended the administration’s handling of the withdrawal on Tuesday
  • He said no one predicted that Kabul would fall under the Taliban so soon
  • They went from owning no provincial capitals “to Kabul in 11 days,” he said
  • He also said he didn’t know if the US would ever recognize a Taliban government










President Biden’s senior aide once again insisted that the White House had no idea the Taliban could take over Afghanistan so quickly and defended the government’s handling of a chaotic, rushed withdrawal.

White House Chief of Staff Ron Klain spoke shortly after Biden declared Tuesday that the US war in Afghanistan was over and insisted he was prepared for any eventuality.

But just a month earlier, Biden said no one needed to be rescued by helicopter from the US embassy — which is exactly how the US withdrawal played out when officials seemed misguided by the pace of the Taliban’s advance. .

Klain defended the president.

“As of July, the Taliban had not captured a single provincial capital in the country…” he said.

“I don’t think anyone thought they would march into Kabul in 11 days in August from no provincial capitals.

“We were sure there were threats and dangers from the Taliban during the march and even when Joe Biden, I became president, the Taliban had taken or fought 50% of the countryside.

White House chief of staff Ron Klain defended the government’s handling of the withdrawal from Afghanistan and said no one predicted Kabul’s rapid fall to the Taliban

President Biden declared America's 20-year war in Afghanistan over in a speech to the nation on Tuesday

President Biden declared America’s 20-year war in Afghanistan over in a speech to the nation on Tuesday

“President Trump left us with the Taliban in the strongest military position it has ever been… But since 2001.”

He again blamed the collapse of Afghan forces and the flight of President Ashraf Ghani for the fall of Kabul.

However, a number of intelligence agencies have pushed back the notion that the government had not been warned.

Douglas London, the CIA’s former counter-terrorism chief for South and Southwest Asia, recently said the Taliban’s rapid advance was one of a series of scenarios that officials of both the Trump and Biden administrations were told.

In an essay for Just safety, he said it was “deceptive at best” to suggest otherwise.

Klain also said he was not sure whether the government would ever recognize a Taliban government.

Taliban fighters paraded their weapons through Kandahar on Sept. 1 as they celebrated victory over the US after 20 years of war

Taliban fighters paraded their weapons through Kandahar on Sept. 1 as they celebrated victory over the US after 20 years of war

A helicopter bearing a Taliban flag flies over supporters who gathered in Kandahar on Sept. 1 to celebrate the withdrawal of all its troops from Afghanistan

A helicopter bearing a Taliban flag flies over supporters who gathered in Kandahar on Sept. 1 to celebrate the withdrawal of all its troops from Afghanistan

‘I don’t think fast. I don’t know if we’ll ever recognize their government,” Klain said.

“What we know is that the Taliban say they’re going to form a government. We’ll see what that looks like, we’ll see what kind of credentials they provide.”

‘More importantly, we will see what their behavior is. Do they fulfill their obligations to enable freedom of travel? Do they respect human rights?’

“I think the issue of recognizing a new government of Afghanistan comes into play here.”

For now, the US embassy in Kabul has moved to Doha, the capital of Qatar.

Other White House officials have become entangled as they tried to describe American attitudes towards Afghanistan’s new rulers.

MSNBC host Nicolle Wallace asked Biden’s national security adviser Jake Sullivan for clarification: ‘What is the Taliban? Are they our enemy now, are they our adversary, are they our enemy? Are they our – what are they?’

“Well, it’s hard to put a label on it,” he replied.

He added: “Partly because we have yet to see what they will be now that they are in control – physical control of Afghanistan.”

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