Top architects beat & # 39; big, fat, stupid & # 39; apartment buildings densely popping up in Sydney

& # 39; Godzillas in the suburbs & # 39 ;: Top architects beat the & # 39; big, fat, stupid & # 39; close up empty apartment buildings that spring up in Sydney

  • Architects have criticized large apartment buildings that pop up in Sydney
  • They say that developers put profit above the quality of apartments
  • Some developers responded by saying that they are limited by planning laws
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Top architects have swept up apartment buildings in Sydney – they say they are uninteresting, cramped and offer poor living spaces for residents.

Architect Philip Thalis, also a member of the Sydney city council, has claimed that developers make a profit over good buildings by stuffing too many apartments.

& # 39; What worries me is that these blown buildings, these Godzillas in the suburbs, are really a bad model, & # 39; said Thalis. The Sun-Herald.

Top architects have slammed up apartment buildings in Sydney - they say they are uninteresting, cramped and offer poor living spaces (photo; Mascot Towers)

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Top architects have slammed up apartment buildings in Sydney – they say they are uninteresting, cramped and offer poor living spaces (photo; Mascot Towers)

Mr Thalis said that natural light, access to the outside and the size of new apartments is determined by the state policy plan for spatial planning number 65 and the Design Guide of the apartment.

However, he believes that the guidelines for new developments are insufficiently enforced.

On the suburbs of Sydney, such as Mascot, Kirrawee, Pagewood, Homebush and Zetland, apartment buildings with large footprints were built, Cr Thalis said.

& # 39; Their huge mass is a problem. They are not divided into smaller buildings, they do not have landscape areas that are integrated into their site planning. They are just monoliths. & # 39;

Architrect, Shaun Carter, who was previously president of the NSW division of the Australian Institute of Architects, agreed that shorter buildings were cheaper to build.

A shorter building means a smaller building envelope – so fewer materials are used such as glass, waterproofing and insulation, he explained.

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However, Chief Executive of the Urban Task Force, Chris Johnson, said that guessing is the reason why apartment buildings & # 39; dumpy & # 39; to be.

He said that the planning rules of the municipality should be loosened to allow longer and leaner buildings.

Steve Mann, CEO of the Urban Development Institute of Australia NSW, said developers were limited in the buildings they want to create because of government and council planning laws.

Apartment buildings with large footprints were built over Sydney in suburbs such as Mascot, Kirrawee, Pagewood, Homebush and Zetland (photo; Zetland)

Apartment buildings with large footprints were built over Sydney in suburbs such as Mascot, Kirrawee, Pagewood, Homebush and Zetland (photo; Zetland)

Apartment buildings with large footprints were built over Sydney in suburbs such as Mascot, Kirrawee, Pagewood, Homebush and Zetland (photo; Zetland)

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& # 39; Regulatory authorities are currently so normative with controls and the development tax is so high that developments are shaped by these constraints, & # 39; he said.

Planning and public spaces Minister Rob Stokes did not agree and told the publication that New South Wales leads the country to ensure that new developments are of high quality.

He said that larger apartments alone are no reason to build larger buildings, and if buildings can be long, they should contribute to the public space around them.

& # 39; If we want longer buildings, the consideration must be a greater contribution to a safe, usable attractive public open space & # 39 ;, he said.

Chris Knapp, head of the Abedian School of Architecture at Bond University, said that slender buildings could look better, offer residents a better quality of life and reduce shading.

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He admitted that having fewer apartments per floor would increase prices per apartment, but perhaps the tradeoff would be better in creating better buildings for the future.

He said that state planning and local government planning controls should be used as a basis, but that building should also be assessed and their contribution to the community.

An aerial view of high-density residential towers in the suburb of Redfern, Sydney, one of a number of suburbs where high-density apartments were built

An aerial view of high-density residential towers in the suburb of Redfern, Sydney, one of a number of suburbs where high-density apartments were built

An aerial view of high-density residential towers in the suburb of Redfern, Sydney, one of a number of suburbs where high-density apartments were built

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