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A poll shows that nearly three in four nurseries, managers and employees think fewer children have imaginary friends than five years ago. Almost two-thirds of the respondents think that screens make children less imaginative

Nursery staff say imaginary friends are becoming less common because too much screen time influences children's imagination.

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A poll shows that nearly three in four nurseries, managers and employees think fewer children have imaginary friends than five years ago.

Almost two-thirds of the respondents think that screens make children less imaginative.

Today's children often have little time to get bored or left to fend for themselves, industry leaders suggested, with time instead filled with screens and activities.

The poll of daynurseries.co.uk, which interviewed 1,000 daycare workers, found that nearly half (48%) say there are children in their daycare that have imaginary friends.

A poll shows that nearly three in four nurseries, managers and employees think fewer children have imaginary friends than five years ago. Almost two-thirds of the respondents think that screens make children less imaginative

A poll shows that nearly three in four nurseries, managers and employees think fewer children have imaginary friends than five years ago. Almost two-thirds of the respondents think that screens make children less imaginative

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In total, 72% agreed that fewer children have imaginary friends than five years ago.

And 63% of those surveyed said they think screens make children less imaginative.

David Wright, owner of Paint Pots Nursery Group, Southampton, said: “One or two children in our children's room have imaginary friends, but they mostly come home when children are alone.

& # 39; Fewer children now have them than before.

& # 39; I think children are no longer allowed to & # 39; bored & # 39 ;.

& # 39; When kids have free time for themselves, they find something creative to do with their minds, such as forming an imaginary friend. & # 39;

He told PA news agency that there is a & # 39; general problem with children's creativity and the development of imagination & # 39 ;.

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# Today, children often expect to be entertained in a certain way so that they receive content from a tablet or a TV, and I think that reduces their ability to then use their own imagination to make imaginary friends. language and stories to be developed and things like that. & # 39;

Dr. Paige Davis, psychology teacher at York St John University, said that TV and modern technology have changed the way children play in general

Dr. Paige Davis, psychology teacher at York St John University, said that TV and modern technology have changed the way children play in general

Dr. Paige Davis, psychology teacher at York St John University, said that TV and modern technology have changed the way children play in general

Dr. Paige Davis, psychology teacher at York St John University, said children who make imaginary friends are usually between five and seven years old, and often do this to help them cope with a situation, or when they develop certain life skills , like talking to others.

It's hard to tell how many children have imaginary friends and whether this changes, she said, because they can be captured in different ways.

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For example, some consider only & # 39; invisible & # 39; characters that a child has invented as an imaginary friend, while others count a toy, such as a teddy bear or doll, for which a young person has created a personality.

Dr. Davis said she believes that children make invisible friends that are unique as ever, but that the way children play with imaginary friends may have changed over time.

TV and modern technology have changed the way children play in general, she suggested.

& # 39; When you didn't have TV yet, or kids watched TV much less, you had this spontaneous piece that they made, that they used their minds without anything else, except perhaps a support from a parent or another child while you now that you have these kids who think & # 39; oh, we should play & # 39; so that's the structure of the tv. & # 39;

Sue Learner, editor of daynurseries.co.uk, said: & # 39; It's sad that the daycare staff have seen a decline in children who have imaginary friends because it seems like they are losing the ability to create a magical and fantastic world full of exciting adventures

Sue Learner, editor of daynurseries.co.uk, said: & # 39; It's sad that the daycare staff have seen a decline in children who have imaginary friends because it seems like they are losing the ability to create a magical and fantastic world full of exciting adventures

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Sue Learner, editor of daynurseries.co.uk, said: & # 39; It's sad that the daycare staff have seen a decline in children who have imaginary friends because it seems like they are losing the ability to create a magical and fantastic world full of exciting adventures

For example, children can play a game with a storyline they've seen on TV, instead of coming up with one themselves.

Sue Learner, editor of daynurseries.co.uk, said: & # 39; It's sad that the daycare staff have seen a decline in children who have imaginary friends because it seems like they are losing the ability to create a magical and fantastic world full of exciting adventures.

& # 39; Parents can tend to fill a child's activities and screens every hour of the day and no longer get bored.

& # 39; When children are left to their own devices, it forces them to be creative and discover an inner world where they meet nice imaginary friends like Puff the Magic Dragon. & # 39;

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The daynurseries.co.uk survey surveyed 1,000 nurseries, managers, and employees in April and May.

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