Tokyo Olympics: Logan Martin wins first gold in freestyle BMX after more success in the pool

Australia won three golden hours in the space of two hours on a historic day for our athletes at the Tokyo Olympics.

Logan Martin has made history as the first ever gold medalist in BMX freestyle, a sport making its Olympic debut in Tokyo.

The young Queensland father, 27, from the Gold Coast, surprised viewers at home with an incredible display of tricks to claim Australia’s third gold medal in under two hours.

Previously, the golden girls of the pool in Australia broke records and made a whole country happy with another great morning in the pool.

Emma McKeon won two gold medals in the space of 45 minutes to become Australia’s most successful Olympic athlete of all time.

The 27-year-old won the 50m freestyle in an Olympic record before claiming her fourth gold medal at the finish in the women’s 4x100m medley.

Australia’s second gold of the day, and ninth of the Games, came after a blistering anchor leg from superstar Cate Campbell.

McKeon is now Australia’s most successful Olympian ever with 11 medals at two Games, including seven in Tokyo.

Australia is expected to win a 14th gold in sailing later on Sunday, with Matt Wearn only needing to complete the course without disqualification to confirm the win in the Laser class.

Emma McKeon (left) celebrates with Kaylee McKeown and Chelsea Hodges after they won gold in the women’s 4x100m medley relay

BMX freestyle rider Logan Martin won Australia's 13th gold at the Tokyo Olympics on Sunday

BMX freestyle rider Logan Martin won Australia’s 13th gold at the Tokyo Olympics on Sunday

Martin scored 93.30 in his first run on Sunday to secure the win after posting the highest scores in Saturday’s heats.

Venezuelan veteran Daniel Dhers, the oldest rider in the field at 36, won silver with 92.05 and British rider Declan Brooks with 90.80.

It’s been a stormy couple of months for Martin, who announced just a few weeks ago that he and wife Kim were expecting their second child in January.

He built a BMX ramp in his backyard to train for the Olympics.

‘I have no words. It’s still getting through to me,” Martin told Channel Seven afterwards.

“I came into the final with all the pressure in the world on me and I overcame that and I managed to win the event from my first run. I honestly can’t believe it. I’m so excited.

Two-time gold medalist Kaylee McKeown and breaststroke star Chelsea Hodges secured the relay performance before McKeon swam the third butterfly leg.

Australia still trailed the US as Campbell plunged into the pool for the final freestyle stage before taking gold in the dying stages in an Olympic record time.

Campbell, 29, finished seventh in the 50m freestyle final half an hour earlier, ahead of her heroic relay race in what could be her last Olympic-level swim.

‘Oh my God. I still can’t believe we just did that,” Campbell told Channel Seven after the race.

“That’s an incredible effort from everyone.

“I guess I was a little disappointed with my 50 freestyle earlier, of course, but I told myself you find out what you’re made of when things don’t go the way you want them to, not when things don’t go right. “Don’t go ahead, not if you’re okay.”

“And I took that mentality into this race and I just thought, ‘You have to be brave and get back out there.’

The medley team of Emma McKeon, Chelsea Hodges, Kaylee McKeown and Cate Campbell celebrate Australia's ninth gold medal in the pool

The medley team of Emma McKeon, Chelsea Hodges, Kaylee McKeown and Cate Campbell celebrate Australia’s ninth gold medal in the pool

McKeon was unable to join her relay teammates for the post-race interview because she was collecting her gold medal in the 50 meters.

The 4×100 men’s individual medley men’s medley failed to replicate the girls’ efforts, finishing fifth in the final leg of the swim program in Tokyo.

Kaylee McKeown takes home three gold medals after winning the 100- and 200-meter backstroke doubles.

Being on a team, so much better, there’s so much more hype around it and I’m with girls who are so decorated in the sport,” she said.

“I couldn’t be more proud of our team.”

Her teammate McKeon takes home gold in the 50 and 100 freestyle, women’s 4×100-meter freestyle and medley relay.

She also takes home bronze in the 4×100 mixed medley, 4x200m freestyle relay and 100m butterfly.

It comes on top of McKeon’s efforts in Rio five years ago, where she won gold in the 4x100m freestyle relay, silver in the 4x200m freestyle and 4x100m medley relay and bronze in the 200m freestyle.

“I never thought I would win a 50 freestyle because I trained for the 200 all my life, but I knew after 100 was so good and I trained so well,” she said.

“I definitely had that belief in myself and I knew I could go there if I said it at all, I knew I could win.”

Earlier on Sunday, McKeon, 27, entered the 50m race as the raging hot favorite before storming home to win in 23.81 seconds, 0.26 ahead of Sweden’s Sarah Sjöström, while defending champion Pernille Blume claimed bronze.

Emma McKeon has done it again with another gold medal after winning the 50 freestyle

Emma McKeon has done it again with another gold medal after winning the 50 freestyle

It was the third time in two days that McKeon had broken the Olympic record after breaking the record in her preliminary round and semi-final.

McKeon takes home seven medals and is likely to claim a seventh later on Sunday in the women’s 4x100m medley relay.

If McKeon were a country, she would be 19th on the overall medal tally.

Entering the 50m final, McKeon equaled former swimming champions Ian Thorpe and Leisel Jones as the most successful Olympians with nine medals.

The women’s medley was Australia’s ninth gold medal in the Tokyo group.

Aussie golden girl Emma KcKeon (left) celebrates her win in the 50m with fellow Aussie Cate Campbell (right), who finished seventh

Aussie golden girl Emma KcKeon (left) celebrates her win in the 50m with fellow Aussie Cate Campbell (right), who finished seventh

Australia has overtaken Russia and claims fourth in the overall medal tally with 12 gold, three silver and 14 bronze.

On Saturday, McKeon gave an insight into how the all-conquering Australian swimmers inspire one by showing off the team common area decorated with current team achievements.

The likes of McKeon, who won the 100m freestyle and 4x100m freestyle relay, midfielder Ariarne Titmus, double gold medalist Kaylee McKeown and freestyle gun Kyle Chalmers all feature, as do catchphrases to fire up the team like “dig deep.” ‘ , ‘Yeah the Girls’ and ‘It’s all about our team.’

Emma McKeon is Australia's most successful Olympian with 11 medals

Emma McKeon is Australia’s most successful Olympian with 11 medals

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