Tokyo Olympics: Aussie Young Gun Riley Day Delivers Stunning Performance on the 200m Track

Aussie boy Riley Day makes a cheeky gaffe on live TV after being stunned by her own stunning performance in the 200m – but still missed a place in the final










Young sprinter Riley Day was so amazed by her sensational 200m run that she said ‘holy s***’ on live TV after the race.

The 21-year-old Queenslander was in lane eight on Monday evening for the semi-finals of the women’s 200 meters.

She finished fourth and broke her own personal best with an incredible time of 22.56, but narrowly missed a spot in the final.

But Day, pushing herself so hard she nearly made herself sick in the heats, was all smiles in her post-race interview with Seven Network’s Bruce McAvaney.

Pictured: Riley Day, 21, interviewed by Network Seven after her 200m semifinal

Pictured: Riley Day runs in her women's 200m heat at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Pictured: Riley Day runs in her women’s 200m heat at the 2020 Summer Olympics

Pictured: Team Australia's Riley Day and Team Gambia's Gina Bass compete in round one of the women's 200 meters on day ten of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Pictured: Team Australia’s Riley Day and Team Gambia’s Gina Bass compete in round one of the women’s 200 meters on day ten of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

“Holy s***,” she puffed.

“That was a much better race than this morning. I have my rhythm. Now I hope it’s the fastest heat so I can make it to the final. Because that’s a huge PB. That is amazing.’

The rising star is now number eight in Australia, but says he is still aiming for number one.

“I want to be the best and I’m not going to stop at anything to be the best,” she said.

Pictured: Team Australia's Riley Day competes in the first round of the Women's 200m on Day 10 of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Pictured: Team Australia’s Riley Day competes in the first round of the Women’s 200m on Day 10 of the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Earlier on Monday, Day overcame some pre-race nerves at her first Olympics

Earlier on Monday, Day overcame some pre-race nerves at her first Olympics

Earlier on Monday, Day overcame some pre-race nerves and claimed the third automatic qualifying spot on her opening lap with a time of 22.94 seconds.

“I was just trying to remember it’s just a race,” she told Seven.

“The Olympics will not change how fit I am, how fast I am and how well I run.

“It can make me lift even more, so I feel a lot more relaxed now that the first run is over.

“The Olympics will not change how fit I am, how fast I am and how well I run,” she said.

“I know how everything works and I can just leave it on the track tonight.”

Day said her semi-final mentality was to “absolutely take it to the end and see if I can make it to the final.”

The biggest casualty in the heats was Jamaica’s 100m bronze medalist Shericka Jackson, who paid a heavy price for taking it too easy and moving into fourth place.

It put an end to Jamica’s hopes of matching their women’s 100m medal win in the semi-lap, although country women Elaine Thompson-Herah and Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce would once again be entitled to podium finishes.

The fastest qualifier was Namibian teenager Christine Mboma in 22.11.

Mboma is better known as a 400m runner, but belongs to the group of women banned by World Athletics from competing in races between 400m and a mile unless they agree to take medication to reduce their high natural testosterone levels.

It’s the same rule that stopped South African Caster Semenya from chasing a third consecutive Olympic 800m title in Tokyo.

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