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TOBIAS ELLWOOD: We MUST thwart China and Russia’s mission to splinter our world into two

TOBIAS ELLWOOD: We MUST thwart China and Russia’s mission to split our world in half

Consider whether it was the other way around and a US balloon had entered Chinese airspace. The Beijing regime would not have hesitated to shoot it down.

But America hesitated for too long. And with the West helping Ukraine, the diplomatic stalemate between Washington and Beijing comes at a time when significantly more choreography is taking place between the leaders of China and Russia.

Those two countries are fully aware that after enjoying decades of relative peace, the West has become complacent and has lost any appetite to defend fledgling democracies, such as in Iraq, Syria, Somalia, Libya and Yemen.

Again, it is no coincidence that Russia, prior to its invasion of Ukraine nearly a year ago, began its military build-up not long after America and NATO withdrew from Afghanistan.

Together, China and Russia are not only openly pioneering a more authoritarian approach to governance, but are also encouraging other countries to follow suit, hoping that not only America, but the entire West will weaken.

Pictured: The suspected spy balloon before it was shot down off the coast in South Carolina, United States

China’s balloon over Montana should usher in another pivotal moment in history: the realization that a China/Russia axis seems increasingly likely and that we in the West are ill-prepared for the looming geostrategic threats the next decade will bring. us.

The incident reminds me of what happened in October 1957, when millions of Americans looked to the sky in unprecedented panic after the Soviet Union launched the world’s first satellite.

It circled the globe every 98 minutes and was believed to peer down with sinister targets.

While Vladimir Putin poses the greatest threat to European security as he leverages Russia’s ability to endure hardship and drag out the conflict in Ukraine, Chinese President Xi poses a greater geopolitical challenge as he ties with America competes for global economic and technological dominance. Since taking office in 2013, he has expanded China’s armed forces to become the largest in the world and used Covid as an excuse to build the most advanced domestic surveillance system.

He is now starting to flex his muscles. China has taken boulders deep in international waters south of neighboring Taiwan and turned them into military fortresses. All illegal under international maritime law – but unencumbered by the West.

This is no time for strategic ambiguity. We need a clear plan to halt the destabilizing agendas of both Russia and China. We must accept that they are determined to see our world shatter into two spheres of dangerously competing influence.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken may cancel a balloon trip to China. But we urgently need to devise a strategy that influences Beijing’s behavior, rather than one that triggers a reaction every time Xi pushes the boundaries.

Without a coherent approach, the risk of sudden escalation increases.

Tobias Ellwood: China And Russia Together Are Not Only Openly Pioneering A More Authoritarian Approach To Governance, But Also Encouraging Other Countries To Follow Suit

TOBIAS ELLWOOD: China and Russia together are not only openly pioneering a more authoritarian approach to governance, but also encouraging other countries to follow suit

Tobias Ellwood: China'S Balloon Over Montana Should Usher In Another Pivotal Moment In History: The Realization That An Axis Between China And Russia Looks Increasingly Likely

TOBIAS ELLWOOD: China’s balloon over Montana should usher in another pivotal moment in history: the realization that an axis between China and Russia looks increasingly likely

Of course, all of this also raises tough questions for the UK. We helped design the post-war security architecture, much of which still functions today.

Our actions earned us a permanent seat on the UN Security Council that was established in 1945. Nearly eight decades later, the world has changed. Can we still look in the mirror and say we deserve this seat? And do we still want it?

If the answer is ‘yes’ – as evidenced by our actions in Ukraine – we urgently need to improve our foreign policy, defense policy and international statesmanship, not only to justify our place at the table, but also to anticipate what is on the horizon comes.

It may have been a weather balloon, but the storms he predicted are not so easily dismissed.

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Jacky

The author of what'snew2day.com is dedicated to keeping you up-to-date on the latest news and information.

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