Home Entertainment Timothee Chalamet holds hands with co-star Elle Fanning as they lean toward an on-screen romance while filming Bob Dylan biopic A Complete Unknown

Timothee Chalamet holds hands with co-star Elle Fanning as they lean toward an on-screen romance while filming Bob Dylan biopic A Complete Unknown

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Timothée Chalamet, 28, and his co-star Elle Fanning, 26, were dressed as a young Bob Dylan and his girlfriend Suze Rotolo when they filmed a scene in Hoboken, New Jersey, on Wednesday for the biopic A Complete Unknown.

Timothée Chalamet has already shown a knack for channeling the cold, timeless aura of 1960s Bob Dylan, but on Wednesday he and co-star Elle Fanning attempted to reveal the music icon’s rarely glimpsed tender side.

The Dune star, 28, and the Neon Demon actress, 26, who plays Suze Rotolo, Dylan’s girlfriend from the early ’60s, were spotted in Hoboken, New Jersey, while filming a scene in the They appeared to be having an intimate conversation while walking down the sidewalk and holding hands.

The scene was on deck just a day after Timothée and Elle filmed one on the steps leading up to a brownstone while wearing winter jackets, which looked a bit like the cover photo of their iconic 1963 second album , The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan.

For Wednesday’s shoot, Timothée, who filmed several scenes on a motorcycle last week, wore a brown striped button-down shirt with his sleeves rolled up.

He tucked it into a pair of baggy jeans with a thin brown leather belt and added a pair of dark brown cowboy boots that had been worn down at the toes.

Timothée Chalamet, 28, and his co-star Elle Fanning, 26, were dressed as a young Bob Dylan and his girlfriend Suze Rotolo when they filmed a scene in Hoboken, New Jersey, on Wednesday for the biopic A Complete Unknown.

Timothée wore his dark hair in a curly, fluffy hairstyle similar to Dylan's voluminous hair of the '60s, although it was closer to the more reserved hairstyles of 1962 or 1963 than the more voluminous hair Dylan wore in '65 and '66 while it became electric; Dylan photographed in London in 1965

Timothée wore his dark hair in a curly, fluffy hairstyle similar to Dylan’s voluminous hair of the ’60s, although it was closer to the more reserved hairstyles of 1962 or 1963 than the more voluminous hair Dylan wore in ’65 and ’66 while it became electric; Dylan photographed in London in 1965

Timothée wore his dark hair in a curly, fluffy hairstyle similar to Dylan’s voluminous hair of the ’60s, although it was closer to the more reserved hairstyles of 1962 or 1963 than the more voluminous hair Dylan wore in ’65 and ’66 when It became electric.

Elle was dressed casually in a black tank-top style sweater that showed off her slender arms.

She was wearing a set of dark blue high-waisted jeans and stylish black loafers while carrying a large brown bag made of well-worn leather.

Her normally blonde hair was dyed a golden brown hue, and she wore it with a side part and slightly wavy locks that fell over her shoulders.

She held Timothée’s hand and appeared to have a conversation with him on camera while he held a modest cup of coffee in his free hand.

The two seemed to be having a lot of fun and Elle scrunched up her face with laughter when Timothée said something funny on camera.

A Complete Unknown, directed and co-written by Logan and Ford V. Ferrari filmmaker James Mangold, chronicles Dylan’s move to New York City in 1961 to establish himself as a folk singer.

The film follows his astonishing artistic development in the first half of the decade, when he went from protest songs and folk standards to forming a band and “going electric.”

The move was controversial at the time, and Dylan angered many fans of his more introspective folk music with the turn to rock, although he would record some of the best albums of the decade in short succession after the transition.

Elle was also seen alone in another scene filmed on Wednesday in which she sported a new costume.

She wore a dull grey, black and brown striped button-down blouse tucked into a black midi skirt, and paired it with black tights and modest black heels.

She covered herself in a brown and beige floral-print tweed jacket and carried a green coat on her arm as she clutched gray and green suitcases.

Timothée was wearing a brown striped button-down shirt with his sleeves rolled up. He tucked it into some baggy jeans with a thin brown belt and added a pair of distressed dark brown cowboy boots.

Timothée was wearing a brown striped button-down shirt with his sleeves rolled up. He tucked it into some baggy jeans with a thin brown belt and added a pair of distressed dark brown cowboy boots.

Elle was dressed casually in a black sleeveless sweater. She was wearing a set of dark blue high-waisted jeans and black loafers while she carried a well-worn brown purse.

Elle was dressed casually in a black sleeveless sweater. She was wearing a set of dark blue high-waisted jeans and black loafers while she carried a well-worn brown purse.

Elle wore a striped blouse and a brown floral tweed jacket while carrying suitcases in another scene. She may have been related to Rotolo's six-month trip to Italy with his mother in 1962. Amidst his loneliness at home, Dylan wrote some of his most enduring ballads.

Elle wore a striped blouse and a brown floral tweed jacket while carrying suitcases in another scene. She may have been related to Rotolo’s six-month trip to Italy with his mother in 1962. Amidst his loneliness at home, Dylan wrote some of his most enduring ballads.

The scene took place on deck just a day after Timothée and Elle filmed one on the stairs leading to a brownstone while wearing winter jackets.

The scene took place on deck just a day after Timothée and Elle filmed one on the stairs leading to a brownstone while wearing winter jackets.

Their outfits in that scene looked a bit like the cover photo of Dylan's iconic 1963 second album, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan. The cover showed Rotolo hugging his arm and leaning against him as they trudged down a snow-covered New York City street.

Their outfits in that scene looked a bit like the cover photo of Dylan’s iconic 1963 second album, The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan. The cover showed Rotolo hugging his arm and leaning against him as they trudged down a snow-covered New York City street.

The scene may have been related to Suze Rotolo’s trip to Italy in 1962 with her mother, which she later informed Dylan had extended to what would eventually be six months away from home.

During their time apart, the musician wrote some of his best early love songs, most of which appeared on his playlists here and there for decades to come, including Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright; Too many mornings; Tomorrow Much Is Missing and Spanish Leather Boots.

Rotolo’s leftist upbringing is also said to have influenced Dylan’s political awakening in the early ’60s, and he credits it with sparking his interest in French poet Arthur Rimbaud and playwright Bertolt Brecht, whom he credits with influencing his composition.

A Complete Unknown, co-written by Jay Cocks, does not yet have a release date.

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