Three years after a road trip, a family of 6 wishes they had changed their home for a caravan before.

The Longnecker family of Knoxville, Tennessee, exchanged their dream home for a trailer and traveled more than 100,000 miles around North America.

A family of six who changed their dream home for a trailer has traveled more than 100,000 miles around North America in three years after having been bored of the suburbs & # 39;

Jonathan Longnecker, 38, and his wife Ashley, 35, said their lives once revolved around mortgage payments and the maintenance of their four-bedroom home.

The couple, from Knoxville, Tennessee, were inspired to pick up sticks with their four children when Jonathan's friend embarked on a similar adventure with his teenagers.

The Longnecker family of Knoxville, Tennessee, exchanged their dream home for a trailer and traveled more than 100,000 miles around North America.

The Longnecker family of Knoxville, Tennessee, exchanged their dream home for a trailer and traveled more than 100,000 miles around North America.

They sold their house in April 2015 before buying a mobile home. They later purchased Airstream 1972 (pictured) for $ 13,000 in the summer of 2016 and spent six months and $ 30,000 renewing the trailer in a comfortable permanent residence

They sold their house in April 2015 before buying a mobile home. They later purchased Airstream 1972 (pictured) for $ 13,000 in the summer of 2016 and spent six months and $ 30,000 renewing the trailer in a comfortable permanent residence

They sold their house in April 2015 before buying a mobile home. They later purchased Airstream 1972 (pictured) for $ 13,000 in the summer of 2016 and spent six months and $ 30,000 renewing the trailer in a comfortable permanent residence

Jonathan, a web designer, knew he could work on the road, and Ashley was already home schooling the couple's children: Adali, 12; Jett, 11; Jax, nine; and Ada, seven.

Longing for a change, the couple sold their home in April 2015, paid their mortgage and used the $ 40,000 profit to buy a robust RV.

The family left for Maine in May and spent the winter in the Florida Keys before selling the RV and buying a 1972 Airstream for $ 13,000 in the summer of 2016.

With the help of Ashley's father, Richard Peck, 63, the couple spent six months and $ 30,000 renovating the trailer, placing it with solar panels, composting toilets and WiFi.

So far, the Longneckers have traveled to 30 states, Canada and Mexico, and have no plans to give up their lifestyle in the short term.

"We were living the American dream," says Jonathan. "We had a great house, I ran my own successful website development business, but we spent so much time maintaining the house and paying our mortgage, we had never had an affair."

Jonathan, a web designer, knew that he could work on the road, and Ashley was already educating the couple's four children at home

Jonathan, a web designer, knew that he could work on the road, and Ashley was already educating the couple's four children at home

Jonathan, a web designer, knew that he could work on the road, and Ashley was already educating the couple's four children at home

The bed of Ashley and Jonathan can be turned into a dining table during the day, creating a useful space for the family
The Longnecker wanted the space to be "homely" but also practical

Ashley's father helped the couple renew the vintage Airstream for its practicality. In the photo is the dining table, which is folded into a queen-size bed for parents of four

"That year, one of my friends started traveling full time with his family," says Jonathan. & # 39; I had two teenage children and I was working on web design like me.

"I never realized that something like that was an option for a family."

Ashley adds: "Once we realized that traveling full time was something we could do because of our line of work, it was not a very difficult decision." We sold the house and used the profit to buy an RV and a vehicle. trailer. "

So far, the Longneckers have traveled to 30 states, Canada and Mexico, and have no plans to give up their lifestyle in the short term

So far, the Longneckers have traveled to 30 states, Canada and Mexico, and have no plans to give up their lifestyle in the short term

So far, the Longneckers have traveled to 30 states, Canada and Mexico, and have no plans to give up their lifestyle in the short term

Longneckers spend hours a day hiking and exploring, instead of working at home or in the garden.

Longneckers spend hours a day hiking and exploring, instead of working at home or in the garden.

National parks, public beaches and large and small towns have been home to these devoted travelers.

National parks, public beaches and large and small towns have been home to these devoted travelers.

The couple was inspired to live a life of travel after a friend embarked on a similar trip with their partner and their teenage children

The Longneckers, currently in South Dakota, freely plan their adventures and settle in each place they visit for an average of three weeks

The Longneckers, currently in South Dakota, freely plan their adventures and settle in each place they visit for an average of three weeks

The Longneckers, currently in South Dakota, freely plan their adventures and settle in each place they visit for an average of three weeks

"One year later we bought a 1972 Airstream," says Jonathan. "The exterior was in very good condition, but we completely destroyed the interior and Ashley's father renovated it."

"Our design should be practical, but we also wanted him to feel homelike," he adds.

"For example, our table is folded into a queen size bed for Ashley and me at night, and there are four bunk beds for children, which convert into sofas, Airstream is also ecological, our waste is composted and we have solar panels" .

The interior was completely eviscerated and ecological. Jonathan says: & # 39; Our waste is composted and we have solar panels & # 39;

The interior was completely eviscerated and ecological. Jonathan says: & # 39; Our waste is composted and we have solar panels & # 39;

The interior was completely eviscerated and ecological. Jonathan says: & # 39; Our waste is composted and we have solar panels & # 39;

The couple says that food and fuel are the family's biggest expenses, but their routine on the road is very similar to that of "normal" families, with children studying in the morning and exploring in the afternoon.

The couple says that food and fuel are the family's biggest expenses, but their routine on the road is very similar to that of "normal" families, with children studying in the morning and exploring in the afternoon.

The couple says that food and fuel are the family's biggest expenses, but their routine on the road is very similar to that of "normal" families, with children studying in the morning and exploring in the afternoon.

Currently in South Dakota, the Longneckers freely plan their adventures and settle in each location for an average of three weeks.

After having recorded so many miles, each member of the family has more than one outstanding trip. According to Ashley: "Our trip to Dry Tortugas always stands out, we took a ferry some 70 miles off the coast of Key West to a small island in the middle of nowhere, a tent camped there for two nights (and) practically We had the island to ourselves alone.

& # 39; The stars were so bright that they seemed to be able to take them from the sky. It was a magical one. "

Although Ashley does not have her own washer and dryer, the couple says she is confident that their way of life is having a positive impact on their children.

Although Ashley does not have her own washer and dryer, the couple says she is confident that their way of life is having a positive impact on their children.

Although Ashley does not have her own washer and dryer, the couple says she is confident that their way of life is having a positive impact on their children.

According to Ashley and Jonathan, their children are "prospering". from the unconventional structure of a life on the road. "We are angry, we did not do it before," says Ashley. "We know it's not for everyone, but it's for us"

According to Ashley and Jonathan, their children are "prospering". from the unconventional structure of a life on the road. "We are angry, we did not do it before," says Ashley. "We know it's not for everyone, but it's for us"

According to Ashley and Jonathan, their children are "prospering". from the unconventional structure of a life on the road. "We are angry, we did not do it before," says Ashley. "We know it's not for everyone, but it's for us"

The couple says that food and fuel are their biggest expenses, but their routine on the road is very similar to that of the families who live in the houses.

"Most of the time, our mornings consist of work, homework and reading before going for a walk or an adventure," Ashley said. "There are some days when we have more projects than others, so occasionally there are full days of work, but most of the time we go out in the afternoon to do something fun."

Although she misses having her own washer and dryer, Ashley is confident that her way of life is having a positive impact on her children.

"Now that they are older, we have seen a big change in children, they spend more time out exploring and being creative with the things around them, their curiosity about the world has really blossomed in recent years."

She continues: "I hope we instill in them a sense of wonder and adventure that will carry with them the rest of their lives."

According to Jonathan: "The issue of socialization is something that comes up a lot, but we do not believe that children need a super rigid schedule to flourish.

"Our children are thriving."

Ashley adds: "We often say we are angry, that we did not do it before." We know it's not for everyone, but it's for us. "

Follow the family trip on TinyShinyHome.com

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