Advertisements
Three elderly people died of a suspected cold shock in France after diving into the sea from hot beaches in the south of the country (file image)

Three people die in France after a dip in the sea during the heatwave in the Sahara in Europe, now that temperatures are rising to 102F and 113F at the end of the week

  • Two men, 70 and 75, and a 62-year-old woman died in the South of France
  • All three members suffered cardiac arrest caused by a suspected & # 39; cold shock & # 39; after they entered the hot sea of ​​hot beaches during the European heat wave
  • Bubble of the Sahara air brings scorching heat across the continent this week
  • Heights of 102F (39C) are expected in France today, peaking at 113F (45C) Friday
Advertisements

Three people died in France from a suspected & # 39; cold shock & # 39; after diving into the sea during the heatwave of the land.

Advertisements

A 70-year-old man suffered a cardiac arrest on the beach at Marseillan Plage, near Montpellier – the same day a warning was issued across the country.

Two more people – a 62-year-old woman and a 75-year-old man – then died on Tuesday in the same region under similar circumstances, Local media reports.

Three elderly people died of a suspected cold shock in France after diving into the sea from hot beaches in the south of the country (file image)

Three elderly people died of a suspected cold shock in France after diving into the sea from hot beaches in the south of the country (file image)

A 70-year-old man died on Marseillan Plage, near Montpellier (photo) on Monday, while two more people - a 62-year-old woman and 75-year-old man - died in the same region on Tuesday

A 70-year-old man died on Marseillan Plage, near Montpellier (photo) on Monday, while two more people - a 62-year-old woman and 75-year-old man - died in the same region on Tuesday

Advertisements

A 70-year-old man died on Marseillan Plage, near Montpellier (photo) on Monday, while two more people – a 62-year-old woman and 75-year-old man – died in the same region on Tuesday

A plume from the Sahara air brings burning June temperatures across Europe, rising further on Wednesday before peaking on Thursday and Friday

A plume from the Sahara air brings burning June temperatures across Europe, rising further on Wednesday before peaking on Thursday and Friday

A plume from the Sahara air brings burning June temperatures across Europe, rising further on Wednesday before peaking on Thursday and Friday

All three are thought to have been the victims of the effects of climate change – also known as the cold shock reaction – after entering the cold water from the hot beach.

Although hydrocution usually occurs when people fall through ice in very cold water, it can also be caused by moving too quickly from a very hot area into cold water.

Advertisements

Hydrocution causes blood vessels in the body to contract quickly, putting pressure on the heart and causing cardiac arrest in people with pre-existing conditions.

To prevent the reaction from being triggered, emergency services recommend entering water slowly – & # 39; especially if the water is cold and you are exposed to the sun & # 39 ;.

The south of France is one of the & # 39; s regions most affected by the European heat wave, with temperatures reaching 92F (33C) on Tuesday.

That will rise again today to 99F (37C) and it is not expected to peak until Friday, when forecasters expect 113F (45C), which will ever break France & # 39; s record for the temperature.

School exams that take place on that day have been canceled to keep students safe.

Advertisements

A bubble of hot Sahara air has brought scorching heat across the continent, with 99F (37C) registered in Trier, Germany, on Tuesday.

Britain is also set to blistering temperatures above 86F (30C) after the last two days of widespread downpours and floods.

The Spanish national predictor AEMET predicted temperatures of 104F (40C) in Toledo on Wednesday and rose to 108F on Thursday and Friday.

The temperature records in June are also expected to be broken in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Switzerland.

Advertisements

In some of these countries there is a possibility that temperature estimates will occur at all times.

Meteorologists have compared this heat wave with that of 2003, which took place at the same time of the year.

The heat waves in early summer are especially dangerous because people's bodies are not adapted to seasonal norms, making them more deadly than heat waves that occur in July or August.

The heat wave in 2003 led to the death of an estimated 70,000 people across Europe, and 15,000 in France alone.

Advertisements

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) france