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Three out of four DIY cotton swabs are NOT used despite being included in government test results

Only one in four do-it-yourself Covid-19 cotton swabs are used, despite being included in the government’s daily figures, it showed today.

More than 450,000 of the kits were shipped to nursing homes for use in vulnerable residents and to Britons with symptoms of the virus in the week ending June 24.

But only 117,759 (26 percent) of the swabs were actually sent back to laboratories to be processed and yield a result, it was claimed.

All 450,000 were included in the government’s number of tests, in a move today labeled by experts as “inappropriate” and “questionable.”

Some of the missing tests – which can be inconvenient to do – were probably thrown out because Britons struggled to sample themselves.

Others may have been thrown out by nursing home staff who were unable to keep elderly nursing home patients sitting still.

But health officials have admitted that much of the unused tests have been sent to care homes to be used for future outbreaks.

The government has been repeatedly accused of playing with her test numbers for being criticized for not meeting her own goals

Using the right swabs can be uncomfortable as they have to be pushed deep into the throat and nose (file)

Using the right swabs can be uncomfortable as they have to be pushed deep into the throat and nose (file)

Carl Heneghan, a professor of evidence-based medicine at Oxford University, told it Sun: ‘If you put it on the shelf, you cannot call it tests. That is storage.

They should not be included in the official test figures. It is an improper use of data.

“I am not surprised that large numbers are not returned. It’s about sticking a long stick in your nose and in the back of your throat – trying at home can be problematic. ‘

Care staff and residents will be regularly tested for coronavirus from next week, but temporary workers ‘are NOT included’

Employees and residents in care homes for people over 65 or with dementia will be regularly tested for coronavirus from next week, the government announced today.

The Department of Health and Social Care said staff will be tested weekly, while residents will be tested every 28 days as part of a new social care testing strategy.

This is in addition to intensive testing in any care home with an outbreak or an increased risk of flare-up, the DHSC added.

Sam Monaghan, CEO of MHA Care Homes told BBC Today’s Today program that he welcomed the new guideline as “the step change we needed.”

However, Mr. Monaghan also warned that, as far as he knows, agency workers are “not involved in this” and that many nursing homes rely on it.

Temporary workers make up about 10 percent of the social workforce, and nursing homes are three times more likely to rely on them than in other industries.

The repeat test program will be rolled out to all nursing homes for people over 65 and people with dementia who have applied for re-assessment in the next four weeks, before being extended to the entire nursing home sector from August.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said, “Our response to this global pandemic has always been guided by the latest scientific advice from world-class experts, and we will now offer repeated tests to staff and residents in care homes, starting with expanding homes for older residents to the entire care home sector.

“This will not only protect residents and caregivers, but it will also provide security and peace of mind to families concerned about their loved ones, and give staff the confidence to do what they do best.”

The government has been criticized for failing to protect nursing homes from the virus.

Professor Paul Hunter, an epidemiologist at the University of East Anglia, said it was “questionable” to count kits used to store nursing homes as official figures.

But he added that it was “good news” that the government seems to have plans for a future outbreak, so it’s not blind as it was the first time.

The latest test goal that the government has set for itself is to reverse every coronavirus test within 24 hours.

Boris Johnson promised to reach the goal on July 1, but figures released yesterday revealed that nearly half of all swabs still need two days or more.

Fewer than one in ten people who take a coronavirus test at home get results within 24 hours – the majority wait four days or more.

SAGE says close contacts should be detected and told to isolate themselves within 24 hours of interacting with a coronavirus-infected patient.

Any longer than that, there is a risk that people will unconsciously infect countless others, making it impossible for tracers to detect every contact.

A Department of Health report published yesterday found that only 9.3 percent of people who take a test at home get a result the next day.

Of the 58,500 swabs placed in symptomatic patients, only 5,468 were reversed within 24 hours.

Of the 76,340 who tested in a drive-through center, less than half (42.1 percent) got a result the next day.

Mobile test centers – which traveled the week of June 18 to test 59,251 essential workers in locations such as nursing homes, police stations and prisons – also found results in four out of ten patients within 24 hours only.

And the results of antibody test kits – tested in medical staff to see if coronavirus survivors have immunity to the disease – were turned over just 20 percent of the time within a day, figures show.

The Prime Minister promised on June 3 that every coronavirus test would be reversed within a day by the end of the month.

But number 10 has so far not provided any data on the progress towards the goal as the deadline expires.

The weekly 24-hour target statistics published today refer only to the period between 18 and 24 June. This means that it will not become clear until the end of next week, when the second set of data is published, until the target has been reached on 30 June.

Meanwhile, employees and residents in care homes for people over 65 or with dementia will be regularly tested for coronavirus from next week, the government announced today.

The Department of Health and Social Care said staff will be tested weekly, while residents will be tested every 28 days as part of a new social care testing strategy.

This is in addition to intensive testing in any care home with an outbreak or an increased risk of flare-up, the DHSC added.

Sam Monaghan, CEO of MHA Care Homes told BBC Today’s Today program that he welcomed the new guideline as “the step change we needed.”

However, Mr. Monaghan also warned that, as far as he knows, agency workers are “not involved in this” and that many nursing homes rely on it.

Temporary workers make up about 10 percent of the social workforce, and nursing homes are three times more likely to rely on them than in other industries.

The repeat test program will be rolled out to all nursing homes for people over 65 and people with dementia who have applied for re-assessment in the next four weeks, before being extended to the entire nursing home sector from August.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock said, “Our response to this global pandemic has always been guided by the latest scientific advice from world-class experts, and we will now offer repeated tests to staff and residents in care homes, starting with expanding homes for older residents to the entire care home sector.

“This will not only protect residents and caregivers, but it will also provide security and peace of mind to families concerned about their loved ones, and give staff the confidence to do what they do best.”

The government has been criticized for failing to protect nursing homes from the virus.

There are 14,658 Covid-19 deaths registered in care homes in England and Wales registered through June 19, according to the latest data from the Office for National Statistics.

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