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Memorial: Students at a school in western Germany visited Buchenwald concentration camp (photo) - but three of them reportedly sang anti-Semitic songs on their way home

German school reports its own Year Nine students to police for hate crimes after they started singing anti-Semitic songs on the way back from visit to concentration camp

  • Pupils at a school in Hesse were taken to Buchenwald concentration camp
  • Three 14-year-olds reportedly played racist songs on their phones and sang along
  • Teachers have reported them to the police who are investigating a possible hate crime
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A German school reported three of its own students to the police after allegedly singing antisemitic songs on the way back from a visit to a concentration camp.

Students at a school in Hesse were taken on a trip to the Buchenwald prison camp, where more than 50,000 people died during the Second World War.

The journey was meant to teach students about the horrors of the Nazis, but in the coach house three boys would have played racist songs on their smartphones and sing along.

Teachers reported the boys to the police and they are now being investigated for a possible hate crime, regional broadcaster Hessenschau reported.

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Memorial: Students at a school in western Germany visited Buchenwald concentration camp (photo) - but three of them reportedly sang anti-Semitic songs on their way home

Memorial: Students at a school in western Germany visited Buchenwald concentration camp (photo) – but three of them reportedly sang anti-Semitic songs on their way home

The three-year nine boys, all 14 years old, attend an extensive school in West Germany, which was once praised as a model in tackling extremism.

Minister of Culture Alexander Lorz praised the school for reporting the alleged hate crime to authorities, according to German media.

& # 39; Hateful singing and abuse are not trivial violations. It must be made clear to the youth that we will not accept something like this in our country, & he said.

The local government in Gießen also expressed its support for school management after the boys were reported to the police.

The police confirmed last week that they were investigating a possible hate crime, but said they could not provide further details.

Liberation: prisoners in Buchenwald prepare for treatment after US troops liberated them from the Nazis in April 1945, shortly before the Hitler regime collapsed
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Liberation: prisoners in Buchenwald prepare for treatment after US troops liberated them from the Nazis in April 1945, shortly before the Hitler regime collapsed

Liberation: prisoners in Buchenwald prepare for treatment after US troops liberated them from the Nazis in April 1945, shortly before the Hitler regime collapsed

According to the foundation that runs the Buchenwald Museum, more than 56,000 people died in the camp during the Second World War.

Among that number were 8,000 Soviet prisoners of war who were shot & dead in a specially established murder facility & # 39 ;, the museum explains.

The camp was opened by the SS in 1937 and was built to house political prisoners, Jews, Gypsies and other groups persecuted by the Nazis.

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About 280,000 people were imprisoned there after the war broke out and were forced to work for the German ammunition industry.

The camp was liberated by American troops in 1945 in the last days of the Nazi regime.

Allied General and future US President Dwight Eisenhower visited the camp and wrote that & # 39; nothing has ever shocked me so much as that face & # 39 ;.

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