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People with fear of small holes complain that the new iPhone 11 Pro design - with its three cameras, flashlight and microphone hole - is causing their phobia

People with a fear of small holes complain that the new iPhone 11 Pro design – with its three cameras, flashlight and microphone hole – is causing their phobia.

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This fear, called & # 39; trypophobia & # 39 ;, causes disgust in patients and is thought to have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or poisonous animals.

The rear view camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which Apple unveiled at an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10.

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People with fear of small holes complain that the new iPhone 11 Pro design - with its three cameras, flashlight and microphone hole - is causing their phobia

People with fear of small holes complain that the new iPhone 11 Pro design – with its three cameras, flashlight and microphone hole – is causing their phobia

This anxiety, called & # 39; trypophobia & # 39 ;, causes disgust in patients and is believed to have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or poisonous animals

This anxiety, called & # 39; trypophobia & # 39 ;, causes disgust in patients and is believed to have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or poisonous animals

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This anxiety, called & # 39; trypophobia & # 39 ;, causes disgust in patients and is believed to have evolved from an aversion to visible signs of disease or poisonous animals

trypophobia

Trypophobia, also called repeated pattern phobia, was conceived in 2005.

Although not officially recognized by some psychologists, thousands of people claim to be scared of objects with small holes, such as beehives, antholes, and lotus seed heads.

Sufferers have a visceral reaction when they see everyday objects and animals with corresponding patterns that are said to cause their skin to crawl, hurt her and even turn their stomach.

Although it is usually described as a & # 39; fear of holes & # 39 ;, a new study suggests that trypophobia is more a disgust-based aversion caused by clusters of roughly circular shapes.

On Twitter, some users reported that the new design overwhelmed them.

& # 39; I really can't handle these #iPhone 11 models with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes & # 39 ;, wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss.

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& # 39; I feel sick and want to climb out of my skin. & # 39;

& # 39; I think it's so dirty, & # 39; she added.

Some reported more visceral responses.

& # 39; If any of you stop at a club to take a picture of me with this, & # 39; started @bbbrughaaa.

& # 39; I would attach a trypophobia and break the whole gaff. & # 39;

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@Ayshia Armani said she was happy that she switched to Huawei because the previews of the camera design her & # 39; itch & # 39; left.

Meanwhile, other users were taking fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, showing future models that would cause even more suffering.

The term is supposed to mean that trypophobia – also known as & # 39; repetitive pattern phobia & # 39; – was conceived in 2005.

Those with the phobia dislike patterns of small holes that can appear on harmless objects such as strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws.

Other triggering sights may be beehives, lotus seed heads, condensation, and patterns created by diseased tissues.

On Twitter, some users reported strong aversion to the new design. & # 39; I really can't handle these #iPhone 11 models with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes & # 39 ;, wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss
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On Twitter, some users reported strong aversion to the new design. & # 39; I really can't handle these #iPhone 11 models with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes & # 39 ;, wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss

On Twitter, some users reported strong aversion to the new design. & # 39; I really can't handle these #iPhone 11 models with all the cameras on the back. They look like holes. Clusters of holes & # 39 ;, wrote Twitter user @ohdulcesss

The rear view camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which Apple unveiled at an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10

The rear view camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which Apple unveiled at an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10

The rear view camera is a prominent new feature of the iPhone Pro models, which Apple unveiled at an event in Cupertino, California, on September 10

The term is supposed to mean that trypophobia - also known as & # 39; repetitive pattern phobia & # 39; - was conceived in 2005

The term is supposed to mean that trypophobia - also known as & # 39; repetitive pattern phobia & # 39; - was conceived in 2005

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The term is supposed to mean that trypophobia – also known as & # 39; repetitive pattern phobia & # 39; – was conceived in 2005

People reporting that they had trypophobic reactions saw that these sights cause symptoms such as nausea, itching, sweating, tired eyes, and trembling.

The origins of this aversion may stem from an evolved tendency to prevent visible displays of infectious diseases, experts have suggested.

As an alternative, trypophobic images have been suggested to be similar to the patterns seen in certain toxic animals.

Those with the phobia display an aversion to patterns of small holes that can appear on harmless objects such as strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws. Other triggering sights are beehives, lotus seed heads and patterns created by diseased tissues

Those with the phobia display an aversion to patterns of small holes that can appear on harmless objects such as strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws. Other triggering sights are beehives, lotus seed heads and patterns created by diseased tissues

Those with the phobia display an aversion to patterns of small holes that can appear on harmless objects such as strawberries, bubbles and the ends of straws. Other triggering sights are beehives, lotus seed heads and patterns created by diseased tissues

In the meantime, other users created fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, portraying future models that would cause even more suffering

In the meantime, other users created fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, portraying future models that would cause even more suffering

In the meantime, other users created fake images of iPhones with even more cameras, portraying future models that would cause even more suffering

The origins of this aversion may stem from an evolved tendency to prevent visible displays of infectious diseases, experts have suggested. As an alternative, trypophobic images have been suggested to be similar to the patterns seen in certain toxic animals

The origins of this aversion may stem from an evolved tendency to prevent visible displays of infectious diseases, experts have suggested. As an alternative, trypophobic images have been suggested to be similar to the patterns seen in certain toxic animals

The origins of this aversion may stem from an evolved tendency to prevent visible displays of infectious diseases, experts have suggested. As an alternative, trypophobic images have been suggested to be similar to the patterns seen in certain toxic animals

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Trypophobia is not officially recognized by psychologists, but if the fear it evokes is excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered in the broad category of specific phobias.

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that anxiety is related to the presence of generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders.

The phobia can manifest itself in the form of disgust, anxiety or both – the earlier reaction being supposed to be the stronger emotion in patients.

It is unclear how often extreme trypophobia could occur, but studies have suggested that about 15 percent of the population may have such fears in women.

& # 39; We all have it, it's just a matter of degree & # 39 ;, vision scientist Geoff Cole who has studied trypophobia told BBC earlier this year.

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Gaining popular recognition, trypophobia was highlighted in the seventh season of FX & # 39; s American Horror Story anthology series, which featured a character with the fear and was advertised using a variety of trypophobic images.

Trypophobia is not officially recognized by psychologists, but if the fear it evokes is excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered in the broad category of specific phobias

Trypophobia is not officially recognized by psychologists, but if the fear it evokes is excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered in the broad category of specific phobias

Trypophobia is not officially recognized by psychologists, but if the fear it evokes is excessive and persistent, some have argued that it should be considered in the broad category of specific phobias

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that anxiety is related to the presence of generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders. The phobia can manifest itself in the form of disgust, anxiety or both - the earlier reaction being supposed to be the stronger emotion in patients

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that anxiety is related to the presence of generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders. The phobia can manifest itself in the form of disgust, anxiety or both - the earlier reaction being supposed to be the stronger emotion in patients

Psychiatrist Juan Carlos Martínez-Aguayo and colleagues have argued that anxiety is related to the presence of generalized anxiety and major depressive disorders. The phobia can manifest itself in the form of disgust, anxiety or both – the earlier reaction being supposed to be the stronger emotion in patients

It is unclear how often extreme trypophobia could be, but studies have suggested that about 15 percent of the population may have the fear
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It is unclear how often extreme trypophobia could be, but studies have suggested that about 15 percent of the population may have the fear

It is unclear how often extreme trypophobia could be, but studies have suggested that about 15 percent of the population may have the fear

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