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Participants perform during a military parade in honor of the birthday of a historic parade in 1941, when Soviet soldiers marched to the front lines during the Second World War, on Red Square in the center of Moscow, Russia on November 7, 2019

Russian troops dressed in World War II uniforms marched across the Red Square in Moscow in a reconstruction of a war procession on Thursday.

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The October Revolution Parade of 1941 has become a symbol of Soviet courage and tenacity in the light of overwhelming opportunities.

The re-performance of the military event on Thursday marks the 78th anniversary of March on November 7, 1941.

Participants perform during a military parade in honor of the birthday of a historic parade in 1941, when Soviet soldiers marched to the front lines during the Second World War, on Red Square in the center of Moscow, Russia on November 7, 2019

Participants perform during a military parade in honor of the birthday of a historic parade in 1941, when Soviet soldiers marched to the front lines during the Second World War, on Red Square in the center of Moscow, Russia on November 7, 2019

The Soviet Union deployed 11 ski battalions during the Battle of Moscow in November 1941. Participants in today's parade can be seen after the march of one of these battalions over 60 years ago

The Soviet Union deployed 11 ski battalions during the Battle of Moscow in November 1941. Participants in today's parade can be seen after the march of one of these battalions over 60 years ago

The Soviet Union deployed 11 ski battalions during the Battle of Moscow in November 1941. Participants in today's parade can be seen after the march of one of these battalions over 60 years ago

Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941. The parade, ordered by Josef Stalin in November 1941, significantly boosted morale among the Russian population. The soldiers marched across the Red Square before going directly to the front lines close to Moscow
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Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941. The parade, ordered by Josef Stalin in November 1941, significantly boosted morale among the Russian population. The soldiers marched across the Red Square before going directly to the front lines close to Moscow

Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941. The parade, ordered by Josef Stalin in November 1941, significantly boosted morale among the Russian population. The soldiers marched across the Red Square before going directly to the front lines close to Moscow

Hitler initiated in early October & # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; - the name of the Nazis before the Battle of Moscow - convinced that the conquest of the Russian capital would cause the country to crumble. Depicted: soldiers marching through the Red Square in today's parade

Hitler initiated in early October & # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; - the name of the Nazis before the Battle of Moscow - convinced that the conquest of the Russian capital would cause the country to crumble. Depicted: soldiers marching through the Red Square in today's parade

Hitler initiated in early October & # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; – the name of the Nazis before the Battle of Moscow – convinced that the conquest of the Russian capital would cause the country to crumble. Depicted: soldiers marching through the Red Square in today's parade

The parade is held on the iconic square of Moscow and consists of soldiers, cadets, members of various patriotic organizations and military equipment, including famous Katyusha multiple rocket launchers and T-34 tanks.

The march recalls the day that Soviet soldiers stamped through the Red Square to the front lines during the Second World War.

In 1941, before the parade began, Joseph Stalin gave a historic address to the participants and to the entire Soviet nation.

& # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; was an integral part of & # 39; Operation Barbarossa & # 39; from Hitler, the invasion of the axes in Soviet Russia. Despite a good start to the military plan, the Nazis had lost 100,000 men, 50 percent of their tanks and more than 1,200 aircraft in the first month, making the invasion costly. Depicted: a soldier who is re-executing the march in 1941 today
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& # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; was an integral part of & # 39; Operation Barbarossa & # 39; from Hitler, the invasion of the axes in Soviet Russia. Despite a good start to the military plan, the Nazis had lost 100,000 men, 50 percent of their tanks and more than 1,200 aircraft in the first month, making the invasion costly. Depicted: a soldier who is re-executing the march in 1941 today

& # 39; Operation Typhoon & # 39; was an integral part of & # 39; Operation Barbarossa & # 39; from Hitler, the invasion of the axes in Soviet Russia. Despite a good start to the military plan, the Nazis had lost 100,000 men, 50 percent of their tanks and more than 1,200 aircraft in the first month, making the invasion costly. Depicted: a soldier who is re-executing the march in 1941 today

Pictured: female cadets are taking part in the parade today. Hitler's conviction that the Red Army would be crushed meant that Nazi soldiers were not sufficiently prepared for the Russian winter and that many did not receive the right equipment for the cold months

Pictured: female cadets are taking part in the parade today. Hitler's conviction that the Red Army would be crushed meant that Nazi soldiers were not sufficiently prepared for the Russian winter and that many did not receive the right equipment for the cold months

Pictured: female cadets are taking part in the parade today. Hitler's conviction that the Red Army would be crushed meant that Nazi soldiers were not sufficiently prepared for the Russian winter and that many did not receive the right equipment for the cold months

Depicted is a crew member of the battle tank as he prepares today for the march through the Red Square

Depicted is a crew member of the battle tank as he prepares today for the march through the Red Square

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Depicted is a crew member of the battle tank as he prepares today for the march through the Red Square

Pictured: participants today during the reenactment. The head of operations for the Nazis during the Moscow invasion, Field Marshall von Bock, had one million men, 1,700 tanks, 19,500 artillery guns and 950 combat aircraft at his disposal. This was half of all German men in Russia, 75 percent of the tanks and 33 percent of the planes

Pictured: participants today during the reenactment. The head of operations for the Nazis during the Moscow invasion, Field Marshall von Bock, had one million men, 1,700 tanks, 19,500 artillery guns and 950 combat aircraft at his disposal. This was half of all German men in Russia, 75 percent of the tanks and 33 percent of the planes

Pictured: participants today during the reenactment. The head of operations for the Nazis during the Moscow invasion, Field Marshall von Bock, had one million men, 1,700 tanks, 19,500 artillery guns and 950 combat aircraft at his disposal. This was half of all German men in Russia, 75 percent of the tanks and 33 percent of the planes

Soldiers marched across the Red Square and afterwards most confronted the discouraging Nazi troops whose manpower and soldiers could overshadow that of the Soviets.

The parade was held to increase the morale of the Russian troops and to give people hope.

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The Nazi forces approached Moscow in early October 1941 when the Red Army had suffered a series of devastating defeats.

Pictured are two honor guards attending a ceremony to light the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. To defend Moscow, the Russians had fewer than 500,000 troops, fewer than 900 tanks and just over 300 combat aircraft

Pictured are two honor guards attending a ceremony to light the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. To defend Moscow, the Russians had fewer than 500,000 troops, fewer than 900 tanks and just over 300 combat aircraft

Pictured are two honor guards attending a ceremony to light the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II. To defend Moscow, the Russians had fewer than 500,000 troops, fewer than 900 tanks and just over 300 combat aircraft

Depicted is the ceremony of lighting the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II

Depicted is the ceremony of lighting the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II

Depicted is the ceremony of lighting the eternal flame in the Monument of Glory on the occasion of the upcoming 75th anniversary of the victory over Nazi Germany in World War II

Yunarmiya (Young Army) members pose earlier today after a march on Red Square. Hitler said that he is Moscow & # 39; wanted to make in a letter to one of his generals. & # 39; The task of destroying the cities must be carried out by aircraft & # 39 ;, he said
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Yunarmiya (Young Army) members pose earlier today after a march on Red Square. Hitler said that he is Moscow & # 39; wanted to make in a letter to one of his generals. & # 39; The task of destroying the cities must be carried out by aircraft & # 39 ;, he said

Yunarmiya (Young Army) members pose earlier today after a march on Red Square. Hitler said that he is Moscow & # 39; wanted to make in a letter to one of his generals. & # 39; The task of destroying the cities must be carried out by aircraft & # 39 ;, he said

During the parade today a soldier can be seen holding the hammer and sickle flag from the Soviet era. Hitler also said that the surrender of Moscow would not be accepted

During the parade today a soldier can be seen holding the hammer and sickle flag from the Soviet era. Hitler also said that the surrender of Moscow would not be accepted

During the parade today a soldier can be seen holding the hammer and sickle flag from the Soviet era. Hitler also said that the surrender of Moscow would not be accepted

They came in some areas for nearly 19 miles to the Russian capital Moscow.

The Soviet command managed to bring new troops from the east of the country and launch a counter-offensive that marked the first major Nazi defeat since the start of World War II.

Celebrations also include the reenactment of important WWII events such as the defense of Moscow and the conquest of the Reichstag.

Participants stand in line during preparations for a military parade on the occasion of the anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941

Participants stand in line during preparations for a military parade on the occasion of the anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941

Participants stand in line during preparations for a military parade on the occasion of the anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941

Participants can be seen in trucks from the Soviet era during the preparations for the military parade in Moscow earlier today

Participants can be seen in trucks from the Soviet era during the preparations for the military parade in Moscow earlier today

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Participants can be seen in trucks from the Soviet era during the preparations for the military parade in Moscow earlier today

Men and women in a variety of traditional military clothing descended on the square for the exhibition game earlier today.

Rows of men in long coats with guns paraded around in permanent formations while others arrived in military cars or on horseback.

After the first invasion in 1941, Moscow was turned into a fortress by members of the public and soldiers. 422 miles of anti-tank ditches were dug, 812 miles of barbed wire entanglements and about 30,000 firing points were built. Depicted: soldiers with flags from the Soviet era

After the first invasion in 1941, Moscow was turned into a fortress by members of the public and soldiers. 422 miles of anti-tank ditches were dug, 812 miles of barbed wire entanglements and about 30,000 firing points were built. Depicted: soldiers with flags from the Soviet era

After the first invasion in 1941, Moscow was turned into a fortress by members of the public and soldiers. 422 miles of anti-tank ditches were dug, 812 miles of barbed wire entanglements and about 30,000 firing points were built. Depicted: soldiers with flags from the Soviet era

Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941
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Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941

Soldiers take part in a march on Red Square on the occasion of the 78th anniversary of the October Revolution Parade in 1941

By 1942 the Wehrmacht was pushed back to 60 to 155 miles from the city and the threat to Moscow was over. Pictured: a participant holds a flag with a picture of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin during today's parade

By 1942 the Wehrmacht was pushed back to 60 to 155 miles from the city and the threat to Moscow was over. Pictured: a participant holds a flag with a picture of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin during today's parade

By 1942 the Wehrmacht was pushed back to 60 to 155 miles from the city and the threat to Moscow was over. Pictured: a participant holds a flag with a picture of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin during today's parade

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