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Professor Ranald Munro has written Natural England to warn them that their ties are tidying up & # 39; suffering enormously & # 39; and are not effective in combating tuberculosis in cattle (cattle)

Thousands of badgers suffer & # 39; immense pain & # 39; in culls to fight tuberculosis, because many need more than 5 minutes to die after being shot, campaigners claim

  • Professor Ranald Munro is the former chairman of the group who assessed badger culling
  • He and 19 other animal welfare campaigners have written the government
  • They claim that badgers & # 39; immense pain & # 39; suffered after they were shot as part of the cull
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As many as 9,000 badgers took more than five minutes to die after being shot as part of culls to fight tuberculosis in livestock, a former government advisor claimed.

Professor Ranald Munro and 19 other veterinarians, scientists and animal welfare campaigners have written Natural England to warn them that their culls are suffering huge suffering. and are not effective in reducing tuberculosis in cattle.

The campaigners claimed that thousands of badgers needed more than five minutes to die after their death, leading to & # 39; huge pain & # 39 ;.

The group also revealed that TB rates had risen in Gloucestershire, the first clearance area.

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A request for freedom of information showed how the number of new herds with tuberculosis in the region increased from 10 in 2017 to 23 in 2018.

Professor Ranald Munro has written Natural England to warn them that their ties are tidying up & # 39; suffering enormously & # 39; and are not effective in combating tuberculosis in cattle (cattle)

Professor Ranald Munro has written Natural England to warn them that their ties are tidying up & # 39; suffering enormously & # 39; and are not effective in combating tuberculosis in cattle (cattle)

The other areas where the culling is being carried out are Cornwall, Devon, Dorset, Wiltshire, Herefordshire, Cheshire and Somerset.

More areas will be announced later this week.

Professor Munro told the BBC that this year around 40,000 ties have been completed so far.

He said: & # 39; The numbers are huge, really. If you look at the chance that you will not die within five minutes of being shot, you look at 3,000 badgers who have suffered minimal pain.

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& # 39; It can go up to 9,000. There is a huge issue of suffering in these ties. & # 39;

The FOI request also revealed that in 2014, 20 percent of the culls were supervised by Natural England staff.

This fell to 0.4 percent in 2018.

The professor and his group have also revealed that TB rates have risen in Gloucestershire, the first clearance area (stock)

The professor and his group have also revealed that TB rates have risen in Gloucestershire, the first clearance area (stock)

The professor and his group have also revealed that TB rates have risen in Gloucestershire, the first clearance area (stock)

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In their letter, the group said: & # 39; We are not convinced that clearing large numbers remains justified in the light of recent data showing zero disease control benefits after six years of clearing badgers in Gloucestershire. & # 39;

Professor Munro is the former chairman of an independent group appointed by the government to assess the culls.

His group revealed in 2014 that 23 percent of the badger shot took more than five minutes to die.

This led them to conclude that the culls were inhumane, something they reported to the government at the time.

However, the Ministry of Food and Rural Affairs dissolved the group and stated that the work was completed.

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In response, many of the experts involved said ministers intentionally & # 39; ignored.

Another assessment, from 2018 and led by Sir Charles Godfray, concluded that killing badgers can only play a minor role in reducing bovine tuberculosis in cattle.

Last year it was announced that 32,601 badgers were killed in 30 areas of England between September 3 and November 1 as part of the controversial clearance.

Dominic Dyer, chief executive of the Badger Trust, responded to the figures and said the culling was a & # 39; cruel, expensive and ineffective policy & # 39; used to be.

& # 39; This is the largest destruction of a protected species in living memory and comes after a record-breaking summer heat wave that has already led to a significant reduction in badger populations in England.

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& # 39; By the end of 2018, the government will have spent over £ 50 million in public funds to kill more than 67,000 badgers that could bring the species to the point of local extinction in areas of England where it has been around since the ice age has lived. & # 39;

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