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Thousands of Australians stand in their driveways for Anzac Day Dawn Service

A VERY Unique Anzac Day: Australians are at the end of their driveways to pay respect at Dawn Service and remember those who gave their lives – because marches and public commemorations are canceled for the first time since WW2

  • Thousands of Australians have commemorated Anzac Day from their balconies, driveways and living rooms
  • The marches for the annual observation have been canceled across the country due to the coronavirus pandemic
  • Held every year on April 25, Anzac Day is a time for those who enjoy freedom to commemorate those who fought
  • Here’s how you can help people affected by Covid-19

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Thousands of Australians stood at the end of their driveway with candles to remember those defending their country during the annual Anzac Day Dawn Service.

Held each year on April 25, Anzac Day is a time for those who enjoy the freedoms of life in Australia to reflect on those who fought and died in battle around the world. But the 2020 observation will be unlike any other: all marches are canceled and the few remaining services are kept behind closed doors due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Australians were not restrained by the health crisis to pay tribute to the country’s military and servant women and instead marked the day by decorating their front gardens, lighting candles and listening to memorial services from their balconies, driveways and living rooms .

Held each year on April 25, Anzac Day is a time for those who enjoy the freedoms of life in Australia to reflect on those who fought and died in battle around the world

Held every year on April 25, Anzac Day is a time for those who enjoy the freedoms of life in Australia to reflect on those who fought and died in battle around the world

Picture: a general view of the empty ANZAC cemetery at ANZAC bay on the Gallipoli peninsula during sunset, in Canakkale, Turkey, on April 24, 2020

Picture: a general view of the empty ANZAC cemetery at ANZAC bay on the Gallipoli peninsula during sunset, in Canakkale, Turkey, on April 24, 2020

Picture: a general view of the empty ANZAC cemetery at ANZAC bay on the Gallipoli peninsula during sunset, in Canakkale, Turkey, on April 24, 2020

The National Memorial Service at the Australian War Memorial in Canberra was closed to the public, but aired across the country from 5:30 a.m. on Saturday morning.

Prime Minister Scott Morrison delivered the speech and the broadcast ended with The Ode, The Last Post and a minute of silence at 6am.

The prime minister drew on the words of his wartime predecessor, John Curtin, when he gave the address to a public-free memorial service.

“Here in Canberra, today, 75 years ago, and in the midst of the war, our then Prime Minister John Curtin called on every citizen to give the same amount of devotion that our military and women give every day,” he said.

He reminded Australia that the original Anzacs handed a torch, clenched and carried high, and it is passed down to every generation of Australians.

“This Anzac day has been passed on to us. And so together, with confidence in each other, and guided by the lives and examples of those who have gone before, we grab that torch and raise it high again and illuminate the Anzac dawn. So we don’t forget. ‘

Mr. Morrison delivered his speech next to the roll of honor, which marks the names of 102,000 men and women who died in service.

“These 102,000 men and women, and the millions more who have worn the uniform of our country, help us understand what love for family, community, and country really means,” said Morrison.

He also paid tribute to his grandfather archer Leslie John (Sandy) Smith, who served Australia in Sir Roden Cutler VC’s 2nd 5th Field Regiment as part of the AIF’s 7th Division in World War II.

A didgeridoo heralded the start of the national memorial service.

The marches were canceled for the third time – the last time in 1942 and earlier during the devastating Spanish flu outbreak.

Broadcast of services in other cities will follow.

NSW Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian, Governor Margaret Beazley, RSL NSW Acting President Ray James, a blower and a singer take part in the 30-minute service from Sydney’s Anzac monument in Hyde Park and the Cenotaph in Martin Place, which 10:00 is broadcast on television.

The RSL’s Light Up the Dawn campaign asked Australians to be on television in their balcony, driveway or living room with a torch or candle right after morning service on television and sharing honors on social media.

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