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Detailed: More than four hundred students were observed for the study, which took place in Croatia and was conducted by researchers at Oxford Brookes University

Smarter people listen to instrumental music! Those who love jazz and classical genres are smarter than individuals who prefer texts, study finds

  • Researcher at Oxford Brookes University interviewed 467 high school students
  • Those with higher intelligence scores listened to jazz, classical and big band
  • Based on the Savanna IQ hypothesis, which paralyzes intellect with new stimuli
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Those with a musical preference for Mozart and Bach are perhaps more intelligent than people who prefer words in their music.

That is according to scientists who say that they have found a connection between brain power and instrumental music, such as classical and jazz.

More than four hundred students were observed for the study, which took place in Croatia and was conducted by research scholars from Oxford Brookes University.

Their results showed that people with a lower intellect preferred music with lyrics, rather than complex orchestrations.

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Detailed: More than four hundred students were observed for the study, which took place in Croatia and was conducted by researchers at Oxford Brookes University

Detailed: More than four hundred students were observed for the study, which took place in Croatia and was conducted by researchers at Oxford Brookes University

It confirms the popular theory of Satoshi Kanazawa, known as the Savanna IQ hypothesis, which connects intellect with new or unusual stimuli.

The author of the study, Elena Racevska, examined 467 teenagers by asking them to perform an intelligence test.

They were then asked to rank music genres in order of preference.

Those who achieved the highest IQ scores demonstrated a clear preference for instrumental music.

The author of the study, Elena Racevska, examined 467 teenagers by asking them to perform an intelligence test. They then asked them to arrange music genres in order of preference

The author of the study, Elena Racevska, examined 467 teenagers by asking them to perform an intelligence test. They then asked them to arrange music genres in order of preference

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The author of the study, Elena Racevska, examined 467 teenagers by asking them to perform an intelligence test. They then asked them to arrange music genres in order of preference

& # 39; After reading the Kanazawa documents, one of which related to the relationship between intelligence and musical preferences, we decided to further test his hypothesis using a different set of predictors – namely a different type of intelligence test (ie non-verbal measurement), and the use of music questionnaire, & Racevska said.

WHAT IS THE SAVANNA IQ HYPOTHESE?

It was first presented by the evolutionary psychologist, Satoshi Kanazawa.

It is named after her and named the Savanna IQ hypothesis.

The theory connects the intellect with new or unusual stimuli and suggests that smart people prefer more alternative culture with less explicit content, such as texts.

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& # 39; We have also measured a number of variables that are likely to have an effect in this relationship, such as participation in extracurricular music education, the type and duration & # 39 ;.

However, it also acknowledges that the study is limited and does not take into account various other factors such as age, level of education and class.

& # 39; Future studies could focus on unraveling the relationship between complexity and novelty in design preferences – complexity of vocalization is preferred by many species, which could mean evolutionary familiarity, & # 39; she adds.

& # 39; An intercultural study could investigate and control for influences of culturally specific ways of experiencing music, and other music-related behavior. & # 39;

The results are published in the journal Evolutionary biological sciences.

CAN YOU LISTEN TO MOZART HELP YOU FOCUS?

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Listening to Mozart can significantly help to focus the mind and improve brain performance, according to research.

A study found that listening to a menuet – a specific style of classical dance music – composed by Mozart increased the ability of both young and older people to concentrate and complete a task.

Scientists say the findings help to prove that music plays a crucial role in the development of the human brain.

Researchers from Harvard University took 25 boys, between eight and nine years old, and 25 elderly people between 65 and 75 years old, completing a version of a Stroop task.

The Stroop task is a famous test that is used to examine the mental performance of a person and where the participant is asked to identify the color of words.

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The challenge is to identify the correct color when the word contains a different color.

Both age groups were able to identify the right colors faster and with fewer errors when listening to the original Mozart music.

When dissonant music was playing, the reaction times became considerably slower and there was a much higher percentage or errors.

Scientists say that the natural aversion of dissonant music and the high success rate of Mozart's smooth, consonant (harmonious) music indicates the important effect of music on cognitive function.

It also showed that consonant music could help people ignore distractions, she added.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart is universally described as complex, melodically beautiful and rich in harmony and texture.

The Austrian composer, keyboardist, violinist, violinist and conductor died at the age of 35, leaving behind more than 600 pieces.

Previous studies have shown that his compositions have cognitive benefits and scientists have found this to be the & # 39; Mozart effect & # 39; called.

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