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This is what 25 years of stock storage looks like

This is what 25 YEARS of stocking looks like: Mum shows off the cavernous pantry she started in 1995 – chock full of pasta, long-life milk and 12 months of custard powder

  • A mom has baffled people by sharing photos of her pantry online
  • For the past 25 years, she has been stockpiling, or ‘bulk buying’ as she calls it
  • One of the bedrooms at her Queensland home is used to store long-life food
  • She has two 1,000-liter freezers, completely filled with frozen vegetables, chips and desserts
  • Her passion for hoarding has been passed on to her children who also buy in bulk
  • Here’s how you can help people affected by Covid-19

A mom caught a glimpse into a huge pantry that she started building 25 years ago in a series of Facebook photos.

She said stockpiling, or “bulk buying,” as she calls it, has saved her family of ten from incalculable stress during natural disasters such as the 2010 Queensland floods and emergencies like the coronavirus pandemic from food entering at any time to have at your fingertips.

One of her home’s bedrooms has been converted into long-life food storage, while two 1,000-liter freezers – the size normally used in restaurants and catering – are filled downstairs with frozen vegetables, chips and desserts.

Filled with capacity, she said the freezers only contained enough food to feed her household of seven adults, three teens, two dogs, and a cat for six months.

Stacks of buckets large enough to hold dry goods such as custard, flour and oats for six months

Shelves loaded with biscuits, crackers and chips

Shelves loaded with biscuits, crackers and chips

Photos show the result of 25 years of storage, with stacks of buckets large enough to hold six months of dry goods (left) and shelves loaded with biscuits, crackers and chips (right)

Family bags of pasta, long-life milk, and party favors like napkins and paper plates are piled high in one of the house's bedrooms

Family bags of pasta, long-life milk, and party favors like napkins and paper plates are piled high in one of the house's bedrooms

Family bags of pasta, long-life milk, and party favors like napkins and paper plates are piled high in one of the house’s bedrooms

“I am so obsessive about them that I can tell you exactly what’s inside and where to find it,” she wrote.

She said she buys fruits and vegetables every two weeks and non-perishable supplies and household items once a month from Costco, a wholesale supermarket of which she is a member.

She also spends about $ 2500 every three months on tins of canned food and bulk bags of dry goods at Bidfood, Australia’s leading wholesaler, and bakes her own bread from the ingredients she buys.

The photos show the result of two and a half decades of hoarding.

One shot shows two stacks of six buckets marked with labels like ‘custard powder’, ‘quick oats’, ‘self-rising flour’ and ‘pasta’. The containers look large enough to each hold at least a year’s supply.

She said she fills the buckets from individual packages and leaves a bay leaf in each.

Bay leaves are thought to repel insects such as cockroaches, beetles and ants that detest the herb’s powerful scent.

She said she draws on her huge stock of custard powder and almond milk almost daily, making both hot and cold desserts, cakes and biscuits.

Huge boxes of chips, cereal and popcorn

Huge boxes of chips, cereal and popcorn

Stacks of toilet paper and trays of baking supplies such as cocoa powder and candied cherries

Stacks of toilet paper and trays of baking supplies such as cocoa powder and candied cherries

Huge boxes of chips, cereal, and popcorn (left) next to stacks of toilet paper and trays of baking supplies like cocoa powder and candied cherries (right)

Other photos show shelves full of biscuits, crackers and instant coffee, and floors filled with trays of water and carbonated drinks.

In one, a whole sport is devoted to wholesale bottles of sauces such as ketchup, mayonnaise and barbecue dip.

Another is filled with jars of non-perishable herbs such as tomato paste, peanut butter and Mexican salsa.

Huge boxes of chips, cereal, and popcorn are next to piles of toilet paper and trays of baking supplies like cocoa powder and candied cherries.

Top tips for storage

* Only buy items that cost half price or less.

* If they are cheap, buy as many as six of the same product at a time.

* When you place them on a shelf, make sure the shelf life label is in order of going out.

* do not buy perishable goods unless you know you can eat them.

* Cans are easy to store, as are toilet paper and soft drinks.

A peek into one of the 1,000 liter freezers, packed with frozen fries and desserts

A peek into one of the 1,000 liter freezers, packed with frozen fries and desserts

A peek into one of the 1,000 liter freezers, packed with frozen fries and desserts

A corner of the bedroom filled with utensils, pots, pans and plastic lunch boxes

A corner of the bedroom filled with utensils, pots, pans and plastic lunch boxes

A corner of the bedroom filled with utensils, pots, pans and plastic lunch boxes

Her passion for hoarding has been passed on to her adult children, who also buy large items for their families.

“As a full-time mother at home, I’m proud of that. This is my contribution to taking care of our family by ensuring that food and snacks and more are always available, “she said.

A woman from Western Australia who was impressed by the stock responded to her post with a Game of Thrones meme that said, “Greetings to the Queen.”

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