Then and now, images show how lockout laws have turned Sydney's vibrant nightlife into a ghost town

Then and now: shocking images reveal how strict lockout laws have turned Sydney's once vibrant nightlife into an abandoned ghost town

  • Photos of Newtown, dubbed the new Kings Cross leaving on a Friday night
  • Downtown suburb became a hotspot for late night revelers after lockout laws
  • Laws abruptly halted CBD's vibrant night economy in 2014
  • Photos & # 39; s of Newtown's dead nightlife gave rise to a division on social media
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Stark photos have appeared of one of Sydney's busiest pubs that are completely deserted on a Friday night.

The city was once world famous for its vibrant and vibrant nightlife until strict lockout laws were applied in the CBD in 2014.

The harsh performance abruptly halted the vibrant night economy and forced nearly 200 licensed locations to close their doors.

The trendy suburb of Newtown soon became the new hotspot in the city for party goers until late after 1:30 am, where controversial lock-out laws do not apply.

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Recent photos show Newtown, dubbed the new Kings Cross on a usually busy Friday night

Recent photos show Newtown, dubbed the new Kings Cross on a usually busy Friday night

Newtown quickly became the new hotspot in town for partyers & # 39; late at night after the exclusion legislation was introduced. Pictured is normally a busy Friday night on King Street

Newtown quickly became the new hotspot in town for partyers & # 39; late at night after the exclusion legislation was introduced. Pictured is normally a busy Friday night on King Street

Newtown quickly became the new hotspot in town for partyers & # 39; late at night after the exclusion legislation was introduced. Pictured is normally a busy Friday night on King Street

But photos recently posted on the social media forum Reddit show that Newtown & # 39; s usually busy King Street looks deserted with closed pubs and hardly any partygoers in sight.

& # 39; Last Friday around 2 pm in Newtown, supposedly the & # 39; New Kings Cross & # 39 ;, was in the mail.

The post later clarified that the photos were taken in the early hours of a Saturday.

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Another photo of the train station indication board shows the following trains that do not arrive in both directions for at least two and a half hours.

Newtown & # 39; s King Street (shown in 2013) became the new venue for partygoers & # 39; late in the evening

Newtown & # 39; s King Street (shown in 2013) became the new venue for partygoers & # 39; late in the evening

Newtown & # 39; s King Street (shown in 2013) became the new venue for partygoers & # 39; late in the evening

Many people who have responded to the post mock Sydney's nightlife.

& # 39; The city that sleeps, & # 39; placed a person.

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Another added: & # 39; Absolutely ridiculous. It really digs deep when you spend some time in another city and you realize how abnormal it is. & # 39;

Recent photos show that Newtown & # 39; s mostly bustling King Street looked like an abandoned ghost town

Recent photos show that Newtown & # 39; s mostly bustling King Street looked like an abandoned ghost town

Recent photos show that Newtown & # 39; s mostly bustling King Street looked like an abandoned ghost town

Leaving the Newtown main strip with closed pubs and hardly any partygoers in sight

Leaving the Newtown main strip with closed pubs and hardly any partygoers in sight

Leaving the Newtown main strip with closed pubs and hardly any partygoers in sight

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But some residents claimed that the photos did not reflect reality.

& # 39; Newtown is always fairly busy until around 3 o'clock & # 39; at night and even then you see laggards. It has a first breeze after the restaurants close and then the second when the bars close, which is as late as 3 o'clock & # 39 ;, posted one.

Another agreed: & # 39; It seems quieter than normal. I'm not sure if this was a weird series of circumstances where other events were between bars on time / time like you said … or just well-timed photos … but it seems strange. & # 39;

A photo of the station board revealed two and a half hours waiting for the next train

A photo of the station board revealed two and a half hours waiting for the next train

A photo of the station board revealed two and a half hours waiting for the next train

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Others argued that the current winter season should be taken into account.

& # 39; Nightlife is generally another scene in the CBD & # 39 ;, someone wrote.

The exclusion legislation was introduced by the NSW government five years ago with the aim of reducing alcohol violence after the fatal blow to teenager Thomas Kelly at Kings Cross in 2012.

His murderer Kieran Loveridge was sentenced to a minimum of 10 years in prison.

Daniel Christie was also killed in a new assault attack at Kings Cross while celebrating New Year's Eve shortly before the laws were enforced in February 2014.

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) bustled on Friday and Saturday evenings before the night lane was destroyed by the lockout legislation of the NSW

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) bustled on Friday and Saturday evenings before the night lane was destroyed by the lockout legislation of the NSW

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) bustled on Friday and Saturday evenings before the night lane was destroyed by the lockout legislation of the NSW

The controversial lockout laws turned Kings Cross into an abandoned ghost town (photo)

The controversial lockout laws turned Kings Cross into an abandoned ghost town (photo)

The controversial lockout laws turned Kings Cross into an abandoned ghost town (photo)

According to legislation, night clubs and bars in the city, Kings Cross and Darlinghurst areas are required to refuse entry to gamblers after 1.30 am and stop serving alcohol at 3 am.

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At least 176 Sydney CBD licensed locations have closed their doors.

Other iconic locations such as the Oxford Art Factory on Oxford Street were forced to change their business model to survive.

During a recent parliamentary investigation by the NSW, billionaire baron Justin Hemmes closed the laws as a disgrace to Sydney, although they originally supported the crackdown.

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) is not the bustling iconic night lane it used to be

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) is not the bustling iconic night lane it used to be

Kings Cross (shown in 2012) is not the bustling iconic night lane it used to be

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& # 39; I think there is a strong consensus that the pendulum has now been swung too far in the wrong direction, & # 39; the Merivale boss told the investigation.

& # 39; Sydney is a very different beast than in 2014.

& # 39; With respect, Sydney & # 39; s exclusion laws should disappear. They have served their purpose and Sydney has been rearranged. & # 39;

The parliamentary committee will report to NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian in the coming weeks.

& # 39; Would the last person in Sydney turn off the light? & # 39; – an excerpt from Matt Barrie's essay

The total and total destruction of Sydney's nightlife is almost complete.

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A succession of incompetent governments has systematically dismantled the entire nocturnal economy through a constant barrage of rules, regulation and social tinkering.

And oh, how ridiculous these rules have become in Sydney. A special person has decided that there is a certain time & night that we can all go out, and there is a certain time that we can enter an establishment and a certain time that we all have to be put to bed.

There is a certain time that we can buy some drinks, and during the night the amount of drinks that we can buy will change. The drinks that we buy must be in a special cup made of a special material, and that special material will change during the night at certain times. The cup must be a certain size. It can't be too big because someone might die. In the course of the night this special little person will tell you what you can and cannot do in your cup, because someone might die.

It is now illegal to buy a bottle of wine in the city of Sydney after 10 p.m. because none of us is familiar with any level of personal responsibility. Apparently there is an epidemic of people being beaten to death during dinner with a bottle of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc, of which we are all unluckily aware.

When tourists often visited Australia, they wondered about our easy-go-lucky attitude and relaxed lifestyle. Now they go home and call us & # 39; the dumbest nation in the world & # 39 ;.

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Sydney used to be a relaxed place where we (sic) welcome the world to throw a shrimp on the barbie. If you do that and someone is offended by the smoke, the NSW government will impose a fine of $ 1100 for the first offense, $ 2200 for the second and probably on a list of registered barbecue offenders.

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