The woman reveals the pain of losing twin daughters after they were born after 24 weeks

A grieving mother revealed to her that she lost her twin daughters after doctors did not offer preventive care against the effects of cervical treatment she had undergone four years earlier.

Advertisements

Chloe Turner, 30, from Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, underwent a loop biopsy in 2014 after a routine smear test detected abnormal cervical cells.

Despite the treatment that puts her at risk of giving birth prematurely, the mobile hairdresser says she was not warned of the side effect and missed the chance of a successful cervical sting.

If the procedure was carried out early enough, this could have prevented Chloe & # 39; s twin daughters from being born 24 weeks early on June 3 last year and developing complications causing them to die within weeks of each other.

Chloe Turner (pictured with baby Alice and her husband Chris), 30, from Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, has revealed the heartache of losing her twin daughters

Chloe Turner (pictured with baby Alice and her husband Chris), 30, from Burton Latimer, Northamptonshire, has revealed the heartache of losing her twin daughters

Chloe, who married her husband Chris in 2017, said: & # 39; In a few weeks we had moved from expectant parents to take away that entire future.

Advertisements

& # 39; All the plans that we had remained in tatters. I can't begin to explain how much it hurts. & # 39;

& # 39; Losing the girls was torment, but this is not about trying to blame anyone. I just want to make sure that our daughters are remembered and had a purpose – and that other parents do not suffer like us. & # 39;

In 2014, Chloe underwent a loop biopsy – also known as an LLETZ procedure – to remove abnormal cervical cells identified after a routine smear.

Doctors do not provide preventive care against the effects of cervical treatment that Chloe had undergone four years earlier. Pictured: Alice and Amelia Turner at three days old

Doctors do not provide preventive care against the effects of cervical treatment that Chloe had undergone four years earlier. Pictured: Alice and Amelia Turner at three days old

Doctors do not provide preventive care against the effects of cervical treatment that Chloe had undergone four years earlier. Pictured: Alice and Amelia Turner at three days old

Chloe (pictured during pregnancy) underwent a loop biopsy in 2014 after a routine smear had detected abnormal cervical cells

Chloe (pictured during pregnancy) underwent a loop biopsy in 2014 after a routine smear had detected abnormal cervical cells

Chloe (pictured during pregnancy) underwent a loop biopsy in 2014 after a routine smear had detected abnormal cervical cells

Advertisements

The treatment uses a wire loop with an electrical current that passes through it and cuts away the affected tissue and seals the wound.

Online NHS guidelines warn that the procedure involves a small risk of premature birth in future pregnancies, because the cervix's ability to keep the fetus in the womb decreases.

But one in five women is not warned of potential consequences, according to Jo's cervical cancer report Not So Simple.

What is LLETZ and why is it linked to premature birth?

The most common treatment for abnormal cervical cells is excision of the large loop of the transformation zone (LLETZ).

It involves removing the abnormal cells using a thin wire loop that is heated with an electric current.

Advertisements

It can be performed at the same time as a colposcopy and is usually done while you are awake – local anesthesia is injected into your cervix to numb it during treatment.

Women who have undergone this or another procedure where cells have been removed from the cervix before pregnancy run a higher risk of late miscarriage or premature birth (before 37 weeks).

The risk level depends on the extent of the procedure that has been carried out. There are indications that in cases where the excision is more than 10 mm, or if more than one procedure has been performed, the risk is increased.

SOURCE: tommys.org

Chloe remembered: & # 39; I remember that I had received a leaflet explaining the procedure, but I was never told about side effects.

Advertisements

& # 39; The results of my biopsy test came back and said there was no cause for concern, so I just put it behind me and moved on with life. & # 39;

After a marriage with warehouse employee Chris (32) in 2017 and a honeymoon in Bali, the couple decided to start a family.

Despite the treatment that puts her at risk of giving birth early, the mobile hairdresser (pictured with Amelia) says she was not warned of the side effect and therefore missed the chance of a successful cervical sting

Despite the treatment that puts her at risk of giving birth early, the mobile hairdresser (pictured with Amelia) says she was not warned of the side effect and therefore missed the chance of a successful cervical sting

Despite the treatment that puts her at risk of giving birth early, the mobile hairdresser (pictured with Amelia) says she was not warned of the side effect and therefore missed the chance of a successful cervical sting

The procedure, if performed earlier enough, could have prevented Chloe & # 39; s twin daughters (photo) from being born prematurely at 24 weeks on June 3 last year, and developing complications that caused them to die within weeks of each other

The procedure, if performed earlier enough, could have prevented Chloe & # 39; s twin daughters (photo) from being born prematurely at 24 weeks on June 3 last year, and developing complications that caused them to die within weeks of each other

Baby Alice for a bowel complication saw her die at seven weeks old
Advertisements

Baby Alice for a bowel complication saw her die at seven weeks old

The procedure, if performed early enough, could have prevented Chloe & # 39; s twin daughters (photo) from being born prematurely at 24 weeks on June 3 last year, and developing complications that caused them to die within weeks of each other

& # 39; We were both overjoyed the first time I got pregnant and couldn't believe it when we were told on the 14-week scan that I was carrying twins, & # 39; said Chloe.

HOW TO PREVENT A STITCH IN THE CERVIX ROOM

A cervical stitch is also called a cervical suture or cervical cerclage.

It's about the & # 39; sewing & # 39; of a tape around the cervix to support it.

The goal is to keep the cervix closed and thus prevent a baby from being born prematurely.

Doctors may recommend a cervical sting because they believe that the woman has a weakness in the cervix – they call this & # 39; cervical incompetence & # 39 ;.

This means that the cervix runs the risk of being opened before the end of a 40-week pregnancy, and perhaps even very early in the pregnancy.

If the cervix opens, there is an increased risk of the baby being born early and not surviving, or surviving with a serious risk of long-term problems.

Source: Miscarriage Association

Advertisements

& # 39; It was so exciting because our best friends had had twin girls the year before – we would be twin parents together! & # 39;

The baby & # 39; s shared a placenta, meaning Chloe had additional monitoring because they were at risk for Twin-to-Twin Transfusion Syndrome (TTTS), which prevents blood from flowing evenly between the two & # 39; s.

& # 39; I first had a scan every week, & # 39; Chloe remembers. & # 39; It was a nerve-racking and scary time, but the twins developed well and showed no signs of TTTS.

& # 39; We knew there was always a chance that twins would arrive a bit early, so in May last year we went to a baby fair and bought the lot – prams, cots, clothes. We have furnished the nursery and prepared everything for their arrival. & # 39;

Chloe was fully authorized for TTTS after 23 weeks, but days later she suffered from bleeding and was rushed to Kettering General Hospital, where doctors discovered she was giving birth and had already been released three centimeters.

Advertisements

& # 39; Things went calm and collected in panic stations in a second, & # 39; Chloe remembered. & # 39; Chris and I were sobbing, terrified of the future of our girls.

After a marriage with warehouse employee Chris (32) in 2017 and a honeymoon in Bali, the couple decided to start their family. Chloe depicted with Alice

After a marriage with warehouse employee Chris (32) in 2017 and a honeymoon in Bali, the couple decided to start their family. Chloe depicted with Alice

After a marriage with warehouse employee Chris (32) in 2017 and a honeymoon in Bali, the couple decided to start their family. Chloe depicted with Alice

& # 39; Alice had already pushed her foot past my cervix, so it was a race against the clock to postpone delivery and to keep the girls in me for as long as possible. & # 39;

Chloe was treated with medication to slow her contractions and was operated on to stab her cervix, which unfortunately was not successful.

Advertisements

She said: & # 39; I was told that I & # 39; had an incompetent cervix, possibly as a result of the LLETZ treatment of years before. I discovered that if my midwife had known I had cell treatment, I could have a stitch applied after about 12-14 weeks. & # 39;

After 23 weeks and six days, tests showed that Chloe developed an infection and had to give birth if the twins had a chance to survive.

Advertisements

On June 3 last year, Alice was born weighing 1 pound 3 oz, followed 21 minutes later by Amelia weighing just 1 pound.

On June 3 last year, Alice was born weighing 1 pound 3 oz, followed 21 minutes later by Amelia weighing just 1 pound. Pictured: Chloe and Chris

On June 3 last year, Alice was born weighing 1 pound 3 oz, followed 21 minutes later by Amelia weighing just 1 pound. Pictured: Chloe and Chris

On June 3 last year, Alice was born weighing 1 pound 3 oz, followed 21 minutes later by Amelia weighing just 1 pound. Pictured: Chloe and Chris

& # 39; Chris and I were absolutely desperate & # 39 ;, says Chloe. & # 39; I had already convinced myself that there was no hope and that the girls would be born dead.

& # 39; When they arrived, we couldn't even see them at first. The staff took them in their incubators and turned them around. To our great relief, both babies & # 39; s responded well.

& # 39; You can't imagine how it feels. We still had a long way to go, but we had overcome an enormous obstacle. & # 39;

The twins were taken to neonatal intensive care at the Birmingham hospital, where Chloe remembers every day as a & # 39; roller coaster & # 39; of emotions.

& # 39; No day or hour was the same & # 39 ;, she says. & # 39; We were told to take every day as it came. One day it would be good news, the next time a setback would leave us broken and sobs. & # 39;

The twins made good progress initially, before Amelia (photo) was diagnosed with Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC), a common complication in premature babies, causing the gut to deteriorate

The twins made good progress initially, before Amelia (photo) was diagnosed with Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC), a common complication in premature babies, causing the gut to deteriorate

The twins made good progress initially, before Amelia (photo) was diagnosed with Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC), a common complication in premature babies, causing the gut to deteriorate

Chloe during her pregnancy

Chloe during her pregnancy

Shortly after, Amelia died and Alice (photo on the right) subsequently developed NEC before she died

Shortly after, Amelia died and Alice (photo on the right) subsequently developed NEC before she died

Shortly after, Amelia died and Alice (photo on the right) subsequently developed NEC before she died. Pictured left: Chloe during her pregnancy

The twins made good progress initially, before Amelia was diagnosed with Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC), a common complication in premature babies that worsens the gut.

She was transferred to Leicester for specialist treatment, but quickly went downhill and doctors gave Chris and Chloe the devastating news four weeks later that they could do nothing more.

& # 39; The consultant was great & # 39 ;, says Chloe. & # 39; He was so compassionate. But I couldn't look at him the way he told us. I just buried my head in Chris's arm and cried.

& # 39; We were told that we could have as many hugs with Amelia as we wanted before her life support was turned off. She felt so small that she weighed almost nothing. She died there in Chris's arms. & # 39;

Depressed with grief, the couple had to swallow their grief, while Alice faced her own struggle for survival in Birmingham because she had also developed NEC.

Chloe and Chris remember the first birthday of the early born twins Amelia and Alice with specially made banners

Chloe and Chris remember the first birthday of the early born twins Amelia and Alice with specially made banners

Chloe and Chris remember the first birthday of the early born twins Amelia and Alice with specially made banners

The couple also had a cake made for their girls and cut into it surrounded by friends and family

The couple also had a cake made for their girls and cut into it surrounded by friends and family

The couple also had a cake made for their girls and cut into it surrounded by friends and family

& # 39; We have been told so many times how well she did it that she would soon come out of the fan. Her eyes were wide open and she looked great, & Chloe said.

& # 39; Then her statistics suddenly fell through the floor. We had a call to go to the ward quickly – but by the time she arrived she had already died and had CPR twice.

& # 39; We were told that in the unlikely event that Alice survived, she would have suffered serious brain damage. We made the heartbreaking decision to let her go after seven weeks. & # 39;

After the death of her girls, Chloe focused on raising awareness about the possibility of premature births after usual cervical treatment, and worked with Kettering General Hospital in an effort to improve prenatal care.

& # 39; Following our experience, it is now policy for midwives to ask about previous operations for cervical cell changes & # 39 ;, Chloe explains.

& # 39; I didn't know the risk & # 39; s and fell through the holes. Nobody is to blame, but I don't want it to happen to anyone else. The policy must be rolled out nationally. & # 39;

Chloe is Get money to fund a new £ 900,000 Maternity Bereavement Suite at Kettering General. Obstetrician obstetrician Stephanie Fretter said: & We are enormously grateful to Chloe and Chris for their support in our plans to develop improved mourning facilities for parents experiencing the trauma of losing a child.

& # 39; We wish them every success at their event and we appreciate their friendly efforts. & # 39;

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) femail

- Advertisement -