The woman had amputated both legs and six fingers after she had contracted a rare infection due to the dog's saliva

An Oklahoma woman had to amputate her legs and six fingers after she had contracted a deadly nipple from her dog.

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In October 2018, Tuttle's Kathy Roberts began to experience flu-like symptoms such as fatigue Oklahoma News 4.

About a month later, she got up to walk and had trouble moving her right leg, so the 60-year-old was rushed to first aid.

Within a few days her limbs began to turn black.

Doctors told her that a blood infection had spread through her body that she had probably contracted through her dog's saliva.

Roberts was told that due to extensive tissue and muscle damage, doctors would be forced to amputate her legs and some of her fingers.

Kathy Roberts, 60, from Tuttle, Oklahoma, first developed flu-like symptoms such as fatigue in October 2018. Image: Roberts in the hospital

Her husband took her to the hospital a month later when she had trouble moving her leg. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital
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Her husband took her to the hospital a month later when she had trouble moving her leg. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

Kathy Roberts, 60, from Tuttle, Oklahoma, first developed flu-like symptoms such as fatigue in October 2018. Her husband brought her to the hospital a month later when she had trouble moving her leg. Pictured left and right: Roberts in the hospital

She was diagnosed with a bacterial pathogen called capnocytophaga canimorsus that occurs in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

She was diagnosed with a bacterial pathogen called capnocytophaga canimorsus that occurs in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

She was diagnosed with a bacterial pathogen called capnocytophaga canimorsus that occurs in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

When Roberts first arrived at St Anthony Hospital in Oklahoma City, she had low blood pressure and a very high heart rate, News 4 reported.

Doctors had no answers to what was wrong, so they asked her to tell everything that had happened in the days before she became ill.

She finally remembered an incident with her little two-year-old Maltese dog that she cherished in 2017.

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& # 39; I gave my little dog some chicken one evening and he took the chicken from my hand – I didn't pay attention, & # 39; Roberts told News 4.

The little lap dog accidentally squeezed her hand.

& # 39; Just a little scratch on the skin there and it wasn't bad at all, so I never thought about two things, & # 39; said Roberts.

She had washed the scratch, applied triple antibiotic ointment and, according to news 4, had continued on her evening.

But doctors carried out blood tests and discovered that she had been infected with a bacterial pathogen known as capnocytophaga canimorsus.

During her time at the hospital, Roberts developed blisters and her arms and legs turned black (photo)
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During her time at the hospital, Roberts developed blisters and her arms and legs turned black (photo)

During her time at the hospital, Roberts developed blisters and her arms and legs turned black (photo)

Doctors believe she was infected after her two-year-old Maltese (photo) accidentally bit her while feeding him chicken

Doctors believe she was infected after her two-year-old Maltese (photo) accidentally bit her while feeding him chicken

Doctors believe she was infected after her two-year-old Maltese (photo) accidentally bit her while feeding him chicken

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the bacterium is found in the saliva of healthy dogs and cats.

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One 2014 study from Japan discovered that the bacteria were present in 69 percent of the dogs and 54 percent of the cats.

The bacteria can be transmitted to humans via bites and licks, which end up in the skin through an open wound.

Although most people show no symptoms when they get infected, according to a 2003 it has been shown to cause serious illness in people with a compromised immune system. study from France.

It is so rare that it affects less than one in a million people.

Infection can usually be effectively treated with antibiotics and is recommended for a minimum of three weeks.

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But there can be long-term side effects such as gangrene amputation, heart attacks, and kidney failure.

The sooner the infection is diagnosed, the greater the chance of survival. About 30 percent of all infected people die.

In mid-November Roberts (photo) had all her fingers amputated

In mid-November Roberts (photo) had all her fingers amputated

Two weeks later, Roberts (photo) was operated on again to amputate both her legs

Two weeks later, Roberts (photo) was operated on again to amputate both her legs

Mid November Roberts (left and right) had all her fingers amputated. Two weeks later she was operated on again to amputate both her legs

Roberts was suitable for prostheses for her hands and legs, and her Maltese has since been amputated. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

Roberts was suitable for prostheses for her hands and legs, and her Maltese has since been amputated. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

Roberts was suitable for prostheses for her hands and legs, and her Maltese has since been amputated. Pictured: Roberts in the hospital

& # 39; They treated me as if I were a burn patient & # 39 ;, Roberts told News 4. & # 39; I had huge blisters and my legs were black. & # 39;

Mid-November, less than a month after the bite, Roberts left her fingers amputated. About two weeks later, her legs also had to be amputated.

& # 39; It was difficult, it was painful to have legs one day and no legs the next, & # 39; she said.

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& # 39; (But) I was determined to get up, walk, and chase my grandchildren, to do the things I like again. & # 39;

About three months later, she became suitable for prostheses for both her legs and fingers.

Despite her ordeal, Roberts has maintained a selfless attitude.

& # 39; I have often thought that it was me (who got sick) and not a baby, & # 39; she said.

As for the dog, Roberts was afraid that he would be put to sleep, but he has since been adopted, according to News 4.

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