The woman becomes the first female infantry platoon commander in the Marine Corps

The United States Marine Corps has its first female infantry platoon commander.

First Lieutenant Marina A. Hierl will lead about 35 soldiers in the Echo Company, a group of 175 Marines and Navy sailors stationed in Australia to act as a response force in the Pacific region.

This is the first time in the 243-year history of the Marine Corps that a woman will be in charge of an infantry platoon, according to The New York Times.

Currently, Echo Company is based in the Northern Territory of Australia, where it is in the midst of a six-month training period.

The United States Marine Corps has its first female infantry platoon commander. First Lieutenant Marina A. Hierl will lead about 35 men soldiers in the Echo Company, a group of 175 Marines and Navy marines stationed in Australia to act as a response force in the Pacific region.

The United States Marine Corps has its first female infantry platoon commander. First Lieutenant Marina A. Hierl will lead about 35 men soldiers in the Echo Company, a group of 175 Marines and Navy marines stationed in Australia to act as a response force in the Pacific region.

The United States Marine Corps has its first female infantry platoon commander. First Lieutenant Marina A. Hierl will lead about 35 men soldiers in the Echo Company, a group of 175 Marines and Navy marines stationed in Australia to act as a response force in the Pacific region.

This is the first time in the 243-year history of the Marine Corps that a woman will be in charge of an infantry platoon. In the previous stock image, a drill instructor shouts instructions to marine recruits on Parris Island, South Carolina in February 2013

This is the first time in the 243-year history of the Marine Corps that a woman will be in charge of an infantry platoon. In the previous stock image, a drill instructor shouts instructions to marine recruits on Parris Island, South Carolina in February 2013

This is the first time in the 243-year history of the Marine Corps that a woman will be in charge of an infantry platoon. In the previous stock image, a drill instructor shouts instructions to marine recruits on Parris Island, South Carolina in February 2013

Hierl is a 24-year-old woman from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

As a teenager, he worked at a local horse farm. Before graduating from high school, he decided to enlist in the Marine Corps because recruits for the Corps did it "sound good".

"I wanted to do something important with my life," he said.

"I wanted to be part of a group of people who would be willing to die for each other."

Before enlisting, the recruiter recommended that Hierl attend college first.

She attended the University of Southern California in Los Angeles before enlisting in the track of an officer.

Hierl never allowed his gender to limit his ambitions.

"I wanted to lead a platoon," he said.

"I did not think there was anything better in the Marine Corps than I could do."

According to the Department of Defense, about 15 percent of more than 1.3 million soldiers in active service in the United States. UU They are women. Female recruits are seen in the previous stock image

According to the Department of Defense, about 15 percent of more than 1.3 million soldiers in active service in the United States. UU They are women. Female recruits are seen in the previous stock image

According to the Department of Defense, about 15 percent of more than 1.3 million soldiers in active service in the United States. UU They are women. Female recruits are seen in the previous stock image

To lead a platoon, Hierl needed to successfully complete a grueling 13-week course of infantry officers in Quantico, Virginia.

Of the 37 women who have tried to pass the course, only two have been successful.

Hierl is one of them.

Under former President Barack Obama, the US military opened all positions for women, including combat roles, for the first time in 2016 in an attempt to make the military more inclusive.

According to the Department of Defense, about 15 percent of more than 1.3 million soldiers in active service in the United States. UU They are women.

Earlier this year, the Corps was shaken by a naked photo exchange scandal involving a private Facebook group and its surreptitious distribution of explicit images of women in the armed forces, often with obscene and misogynistic comments.

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