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The White House moves the portraits of Bill Clinton and George Bush to a room where tablecloths are kept

The White House moves portraits of the portraits of Bill Clinton and George Bush from their prominent position in the foyer to a room used for storage

  • The White House has moved official portraits of former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush to a room where neither Trump nor visitors will see them
  • The portraits hung in the Grand Foyer of the White House until last week
  • They have been moved to the Old Family Dining Room, a small, rarely used room
  • Traditionally, the portraits of those who were most recently president hang in the most prominent place
  • The portraits have been replaced by Republican presidents William McKinley and Theodore Roosevelt, Republican presidents who served in 1897 and 1901

The White House has suddenly moved two portraits of President Donald Trump’s predecessors from their prominent positions in the entrance hall to the house.

Official portraits of former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush have been removed and replaced in recent days.

In the past, photographs of the most recent residents of the residence at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue have been prominently displayed and hung in the Grand Foyer of the White House.

Official portrait of President Bill Clinton

Official portrait of President George W. Bush

Official portrait of President George W. Bush

The White House has moved official portraits of former Presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush to a room where President Trump and any visitors will not see them

A portrait of former US President Bill Clinton hangs in the Grand Foyer of the White House. Shown here in December 2014

A portrait of former US President Bill Clinton hangs in the Grand Foyer of the White House. Shown here in December 2014

A portrait of former US President Bill Clinton hangs in the Grand Foyer of the White House. Shown here in December 2014

The photos were last seen at a news conference on July 8 when the Mexican president came to visit. The portrait of former President Bill Clinton can be seen here

The photos were last seen at a news conference on July 8 when the Mexican president came to visit. The portrait of former President Bill Clinton can be seen here

The photos were last seen at a news conference on July 8 when the Mexican president came to visit. The portrait of former President Bill Clinton can be seen here

It is a tradition that those who were last in the Oval Office are placed closest to the entrance of the house, within reach of anyone visiting, according to CNN.

The places occupied by Bush and Clinton have been taken over by two portraits of Republican presidents who have served for over 100 years.

The pair of presidential paintings have been moved to the Old Family Dining Room, a small room next to the large State Dining Room, used to store unused tablecloths and furniture.

The room is so insignificant that it was not part of any public house tours given before the coronavirus pandemic hit.

The portraits have now been moved to the Family Dining, circled at the top left. The room is rarely used and is not a tour of the White House. It has recently been used for storage

The portraits have now been moved to the Family Dining, circled at the top left. The room is rarely used and is not a tour of the White House. It has recently been used for storage

The portraits have now been moved to the Family Dining, circled at the top left. The room is rarely used and is not a tour of the White House. It has recently been used for storage

For decades, a tradition has been honored in which the current White House residence honors their predecessor with an unveiling of their portrait. Pictured, Obama will host former President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush in 2012

For decades, a tradition has been honored in which the current White House residence honors their predecessor with an unveiling of their portrait. Pictured, Obama will host former President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush in 2012

For decades, a tradition has been honored in which the current White House residence honors their predecessor with an unveiling of their portrait. Pictured, Obama will host former President George W. Bush and first lady Laura Bush in 2012

The Bush and Clinton portraits were last seen earlier this month during a recent engagement when President Trump welcomed Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador.

The two of them stood in the Cross Hall room of the house and made respective comments for the portraits to look at.

The paintings would also have been visible to Trump every day as he walked down the stairs from his private home.

The Bush portrait has been replaced by the 25th President of America, William McKinley, while the Clinton portrait has been replaced by Theodore Roosevelt who served behind McKinley.

In May, it was revealed that Barack and Michelle Obama’s presidential and first lady portraits will not be revealed and hanged in the White House until Donald Trump is out of the office.

The longstanding tradition of current presidents attending the unveiling ceremony of the portraits of their predecessors and their wives during their first term will be skipped during this presidency due to a bitter feud between Trump and Obama.

Donald Trump

Donald Trump

Barack Obama

Barack Obama

Donald Trump and Barack Obama have no interest in participating in the long tradition of past presidents returning to meet the current president at a ceremony to reveal their presidential portraits

If Trump wins a second term in November, it means Obama may have to wait until 2025 to reveal his portrait and show it in the White House under any US president in front of him.

The tradition of previous presidents returning to the White House to meet their successor to reveal their portraits seems to date back to the 1970s

Jimmy Carter welcomed Gerald Ford and his wife Betty back into the White House just four years after Carter defeated Ford in his reelection bid for the first formal East Room ceremony in 1980.

And after George HW Bush lost the reelection, Bill Clinton still received Bush in the East Room and said “Welcome home.”

“We may have our political differences, but the presidency transcends those differences,” Obama said when he presented former President George W. Bush for his 2012 portrait unveiling.

After George HW Bush lost his reelection offer, Bill Clinton received him and his wife in the East Room and said “Welcome home” when his portrait was revealed. Shown in July 1995

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