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The White House claims that Donald Trump was ‘taken out of context’ when he proposed injecting disinfectant

The White House accused the media on Friday of “taking out of context” President Donald Trump’s bizarre comments about injecting coronavirus patients with disinfectant and making them sensational.

New White House secretary Kayleigh McEnany lashed out at the media more than 12 hours after the president proposed unusual treatments for coronavirus patients, including injecting disinfectants that prove effective against the virus on surfaces, exposing them to rays that can also cause it to break down.

“President Trump has repeatedly said that Americans should consult doctors about the treatment of coronavirus, a point he emphasized again during yesterday’s briefing,” McEnany said in a statement.

“Leave it to the media to irresponsibly take President Trump out of context and to walk around with negative heads,” she added.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany attends a coronavirus task force briefing with President Donald Trump at the White House Saturday, April 18, 2020 in Washington

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany attends a coronavirus task force briefing with President Donald Trump at the White House Saturday, April 18, 2020 in Washington

The president noted during the briefing that he is not a doctor, although he also suggested that he have a special intuition about medical issues. He made the comment while speaking to William Bryan, an acting officer overseeing the Homeland Security Department’s science and technology programs. Bryan is not a doctor or scientist either.

“I would like you to talk to the doctors to see if there is a way you can apply light and heat to heal. You know – but if you could. And maybe, maybe not. Again, I say, maybe, maybe not. I am not a doctor. But I’m like a person with a good you know what, “Trump said, pointing to his head to emphasize his cleverness.

Trump also sought a second opinion from Dr. Deborah Birx, a physician who coordinates his coronavirus task force, shared his idea during Thursday’s briefing. He received no resounding approval – and the White House had to correct a transcript on Friday morning implying that she had supported the suggestion.

“Deborah, have you ever heard of that? The heat and light, relative to certain viruses, yes, but relative to this virus? Trump asked Birx immediately after he floated the idea.

“Not as a treatment. I mean, a fever is definitely a good thing. When you have a fever, it helps your body respond. But not like – I haven’t seen any heat or (inaudible) ‘according to the last transcript.

The transcript released at about 10 p.m. on Thursday amid the uproar had Birx reply, “That’s a treatment.”

WAS TRUMP TAKEN FROM CONTEXT? READ WHAT HE SAYS AND MAKE YOUR OWN OPINION

TRUMP: ‘I would like you to talk to the doctors to see if there is a way you can apply light and heat to heal. You know – but if you could. And maybe, maybe not. Again, I say, maybe, maybe not. I am not a doctor. But I am like a person with a good you know what.

Q: “But sir, you are the President.”

TRUMP: “Deborah, have you ever heard of that? The heat and light, relative to certain viruses, yes, but relative to this virus? ‘

DR. DEBORAH BIRX: ‘Not as a treatment. I mean, certainly a fever … “

TRUMP: “Yes.”

DR. BIRX: ‘it is a good thing. When you have a fever, it helps your body respond. But not if – I haven’t seen any heat or (inaudible). ‘

TRUMP: ‘I love watching it. I mean, you know. Okay?’

The setback comes when the maker of Lysol has issued a statement stating that under no circumstances should disinfectants be injected or consumed.

At the White House press conference on Thursday, Trump proposed unorthodox new treatments for the coronavirus – including injecting cleansers into the body and using ultraviolet light.

Trump, who studied finance and real estate, but praises his instinct on medical and scientific issues, raised potential treatments at the White House press conference on Thursday.

Trump asked William Bryan, a senior science and technology advisor to Homeland Security, “What if we hit the body with a tremendous blow, whether it’s ultraviolet or just very powerful light? And I think you said that it hasn’t been checked, but you’re going to test it.

“And then I said, suppose you put the light into the body that you can do through the skin or some other way. And I think you said you’re going to test that too. Sounds interesting.’

Then he brought up another possible treatment. “And then I see the disinfectant, where it turns it off in a minute, a minute, and is there a way we can do something like that? By injection inside or almost a cleaning. As you can see, it gets into the lungs and does a huge amount into the lungs. So it would be interesting to check that, ‘said Trump.

“So you have to use doctors. But it sounds interesting to me, “he said.

It came after Bryan filed a report claiming that ultraviolet rays and heat have a powerful influence on the pathogen.

The ‘study’ – which has not been peer-reviewed and is therefore not a full-fledged study – also revealed that bleach can destroy the virus when isolated from saliva within five minutes, while isopropyl alcohol only took a minute to kill it.

Both were when the virus was outside the body.

“It sounds interesting to me,” Trump said Thursday, telling reporters he asked an official if cleaning products could be injected into patients to fight the coronavirus

Trump's challenger in the upcoming 2020 elections also agreed to Joe Biden, advising the President to focus on testing and personal protective equipment rather than spitting out wild theories

Trump's challenger in the upcoming 2020 elections also agreed to Joe Biden, advising the President to focus on testing and personal protective equipment rather than spitting out wild theories

Trump’s challenger in the upcoming 2020 elections also agreed to Joe Biden, advising the President to focus on testing and personal protective equipment rather than spitting out wild theories

US President Donald Trump responds between Acting Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, William Bryan and Vice President Mike Pence, Deputy Minister of Science and Technology during the daily briefing of the White House Coronavirus Task Force in Washington, USA, April 23, 2020

US President Donald Trump responds between Acting Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, William Bryan and Vice President Mike Pence, Deputy Minister of Science and Technology during the daily briefing of the White House Coronavirus Task Force in Washington, USA, April 23, 2020

US President Donald Trump responds between Acting Deputy Minister of Science and Technology, William Bryan and Vice President Mike Pence, Deputy Minister of Science and Technology during the daily briefing of the White House Coronavirus Task Force in Washington, USA, April 23, 2020

A depiction of best practices called for activities to be moved out and noted that heat and humidity harm the virus. President Donald Trump listens to Bill Bryan, science and technology adviser to the Secretary of Homeland Security

A depiction of best practices called for activities to be moved out and noted that heat and humidity harm the virus. President Donald Trump listens to Bill Bryan, science and technology adviser to the Secretary of Homeland Security

A depiction of best practices called for activities to be moved out and noted that heat and humidity harm the virus

Despite hopes that infections could subside with a rise in temperature towards the summer due to the fact that the virus would remain in the environment for less than it has now, the study has not yet been made public and is awaiting external evaluation.

Trump, who noted that he is not a doctor on Thursday, did not guarantee results on his line of research regarding a possible treatment.

“So we’ll see. But the whole concept of the light, the way it kills it in one minute – that’s quite powerful, ”he said.

Vice President Mike Pence – who is also not a doctor or scientist – said the nation “may well give us a summer break from the coronavirus.”

Bryan, whose formal title is Senior Official Performing the Duties of the Under Secretary for Science and Technology at the Department of Homeland Security, spoke about studies in a government lab. He is not a research scientist.

LYSOL MAKER: DO NOT INJECT OR USE DISINFECTANTS

Under no circumstances should disinfectants be injected or consumed, the company that makes Lysol has warned, following comments from Donald Trump.

Disinfectant manufacturer RB, the company behind the Dettol and Lysol brands, urged people not to try the method.

The company released a statement saying, “Due to recent speculation and social media activity, RB has been asked whether internal disinfectant administration could be appropriate for research or use as a treatment for coronavirus.

“As a world leader in health and hygiene products, we must be clear that under no circumstances should our disinfectant products be administered to the human body (by injection, ingestion or any other route).”

It added that all of its products should only be used as intended and according to the usage guidelines.

It showed that temperature increases gradually had beneficial effects in reducing the ‘half-life’ of the virus, where it essentially breaks down.

But he warned that even if the virus dies on top of playground equipment in the summer, it can still remain on surfaces that don’t get direct light or get less heat.

WHY SUNLIGHT HELPS KILL THE VIRUS – BUT NOT IN THE ENVIRONMENT IN YOUR BODY

Donald Trump’s bizarre outburst began when a Department of Homeland Security employee revealed an “investigation” about the effect of sunlight and moisture on the virus.

Bill Bryan, a non-scientist DHS official, spoke of “research” by his biological warfare unit on the virus.

It was hardly groundbreaking, but was intended to support an earlier Trump non-scientific claim that the virus would disappear in the summer.

Of course, the study did no such thing and was not peer-reviewed or fully published for scientific clarity.

A politically appointed unconfirmed by the Senate, Bryan said, “Our most notable observation to date is the powerful effect sunlight seems to have on killing the virus, both on surfaces and in the air – but crucially not in the body. .

“We have also seen a similar effect with both temperature and humidity, with increasing temperature and humidity or both generally less beneficial to the virus.”

Bryan shared a slide that showed that the virus half-life – the time it took to cut the amount outside the body by half – was 18 hours when the temperature was 70-75F (21-24C).

That was based on 20 percent humidity in air conditions, and the virus was found on a non-porous surface, including things like door handles and stainless steel.

But the half-life dropped to six hours when the humidity rose to 80 percent – and just two minutes when sunlight was added to the equation.

When the virus was nebulized – floating in the air – the half-life was one hour when the temperature was 70-75F with 20 percent humidity.

In the presence of sunlight, according to the slides, this dropped to just a minute and a half.

In theory, this means that the virus is less likely to spread in the summer.

TRANSMISSION MAY BE SLOW IN SUMMER, “NON-SCIENTIFIC CLAIMS

Bryan concluded that summer conditions “will create an environment (where) transmission can be reduced.”

However, he added that reduced spread did not mean that the pathogen would be completely eliminated and that social distance guidelines cannot be completely lifted.

Bryan said, “It would be irresponsible to say that we feel like summer will just kill the virus completely.”

WHY YOU MUST BE SKEPTICAL

The paper itself was not immediately released for review, making it difficult for other experts to comment on how robust the methods were.

An important question will be what the intensity and wavelength of the UV light used in the experiment was.

For example, it may have been in an environment that did not accurately mimic natural summer lighting conditions.

Dr. Benjamin Neuman, president of biological sciences, Texas A&M University-Texarkana, said, “It would be good to know how the test was conducted.

“Not that it would go bad, just that there are different ways to count viruses, depending on what aspect you want to study.”

DO SCIENTIS AGREE THAT THE VIRUS IS SEASON?

U.S. health authorities believe that even if COVID-19 cases slow down during the summer, the infection rate is likely to increase again as winter approaches.

Flu and cold transmission both decrease in the summer, in part because people spend less time indoors and in close contact with others.

A Chinese study earlier this month erased hopes that warmer weather will stop the northern hemisphere pandemic.

Researchers from Fudan University analyzed the spread of the coronavirus in 224 Chinese cities, including 17 in Hubei Province, where the outbreak began.

The study then compared this information with daily weather data for the period between January and early March 2020.

The team found that there was no significant association between the temperature or levels of UV exposure from sunlight and the overall infection rate.

But some scientific studies also agree that the virus performs better in cold and dry weather than in hot and humid conditions.

Studies from both Beihang and Tsinghua universities found that the transmission rate of COVID-19 in China decreased as the temperature warmed.

And the lower spread rate in the Southern Hemisphere countries – which were hit by outbreaks in the summer – proves the theory.

For example, Australia has had just under 7,000 confirmed cases and 77 deaths – well among many Northern Hemisphere countries.

It is believed that the reasons are that breathing drops can stay in the air longer in colder weather.

Studies also show that viruses break down faster on warmer surfaces because a protective layer of fat that envelops them dries out faster.

WILL OTHER STUDIES SHOW UV LIGHT CAN THE VIRUS DO OUTSIDE THE BODY?

It has long been known that UV light has a sterilizing effect on surfaces because the radiation damages the genetic material of viruses and their ability to replicate.

Most viruses – such as SARS-CoV-2 – are covered with a thin membrane that is easily broken down by UV rays.

A study from Columbia University published in Scientific reports two years ago, it was found that the light can kill more than 95 percent of pathogens such as the coronavirus.

Other research, including one study FDA has shown it can work against similar coronaviruses, such as SARS.

But it was UVC – a third type of ray that people rarely encounter from the sun because it is filtered out into the ozone layer – that worked.

Germicidal UVC light is used in hospitals in the US and hospitals in the UK to clean rooms and equipment.

China has taken over UVC in its fight against the coronavirus, deployed it in buses and used robots to clean hospital floors with rays.

To be clear, using UV light on your hands is dangerous: it can lead to skin cancer.

WILL I CATCH THE CORONAVIRUS IF IT IS SUNNY OUTSIDE?

Actually yes. The World Health Organization warns that you can catch COVID-19 no matter how sunny or warm the weather is.

Cases of the deadly virus have been recorded around the world, including in West Africa and the Middle East.

Scientists agree that you are always at risk of contracting the virus during an outbreak because it is random and never sleeps.

Trump’s idea has already been praised by the medical community, with pulmonologist Dr. Vin Gupta who warned the public on NBC News that Trump’s idea could have fatal consequences: “This idea of ​​injecting or ingesting any type of cleanser into the body is irresponsible and dangerous.

“It’s a common method people use when they want to commit suicide.”

Joe Biden advised the President to focus on PPE and testing, rather than wild theories, “UV light? Inject disinfectant? Here’s an idea, Mr. President: More tests. Now. And protective equipment for real medical professionals. ‘

Agents commonly used to kill the virus in the environment, bleach and isopropyl alcohol, are both toxic to the body when taken.

Dr. Gupta added that even small amounts of disinfectant can be deadly and hearing the White House express such dangerous ideas was depressing.

Less serious effects of taking bleach include vomiting, diarrhea, nausea, dizziness, palpitations and rapid breathing, similar to symptoms of severe dehydration.

Gupta also accused the president of proposing unproven treatments.

The government’s own Food and Drug Administration warned last year about disinfectant consumption following a wave of deaths from people drinking a so-called Miracle Mineral Solution, which circulated on social media as a solution for various types of illness.

John Balmes, a pulmonologist at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, added to Gupta’s warning that even inhaling chlorine bleach “would be the absolute worst thing for the lungs.”

“The airways and lungs are not made to be even exposed to a spray of disinfectant,” he told Bloomberg.

Even a low dilution of bleach or isopropyl alcohol is not safe. It is a totally ridiculous concept. ‘

The medical community unanimously took to Twitter to warn people of how dangerous the president’s advice could be.

Kashif Mahmood, a physician in Charleston, West Virginia, tweeted, “As a physician, I cannot recommend injecting disinfectant into the lungs or using UV radiation in the body to treat Covid-19.

“Don’t take Trump’s medical advice.”

In response to Trump’s comments, disinfectant manufacturer RB, the company behind the Dettol and Lysol brands, said under “no circumstances” that disinfectants should be injected or consumed.

After making suggestions on cleansers and UV light on Thursday, Trump mentioned moving briefings to the Rose Garden for safety. “This is a very interesting meeting for me.”

He said of the government laboratory, “You can call it a laboratory, because it really is.”

Bryan is not a scientist and has worked at the Energy Department and the Pentagon. He holds a Master of Science in strategic intelligence from the Joint Military Intelligence College in Washington, D.C. and a Bachelor of Science in logistics system management from Colorado Technical University in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Trump also attacked the “ fake news ” during the briefing, denying that he relinquished promoting hydroxychloroquine as a treatment for the virus.

He has watered down his notes and not mentioned them very often in recent briefings.

A recent study in patients’ VA found a higher death rate for those who received hydroxychloroquine and an antibiotic.

“It’s great for malaria for lupus and other things and we’ll see what it is,” Trump said of the drug, which he once said he would take himself. He previously called it a ‘game changer’ and ordered millions of doses into the national supply.

At one point, Trump asked the Coronavirus Task Force coordinator, Dr. Deborah Birx, telling her, “I would like you to talk to the doctors to see if there is a way you can use light and heat to heal. You know, if you could, “he said.

Trump then added, “I’m not a doctor. I’m a person who has something good, you know what, “he said, pointing to his head.

Trump was also stiff about whether it could be a health risk if people use the new information and decide to call off the social distance guidelines.

‘Here we go. The new headline is that Trump is asking people to go outside, which is dangerous, “the president fumed.

“I hope people enjoy the sun and if it makes an impact, that’s great,” he said.

Trump also seemed to refer to his February comments about the virus and predicted it would disappear in the spring.

He had said, “Now, the virus we need to talk about – you know, a lot of people think the heat will go away in April – when the heat comes in.

“It usually disappears in April. However, we are in top shape. We have 12 cases – 11 cases, and many of them are now good for it, ‘Trump added long before the virus would kill nearly 50,000 Americans.

“The fake news did not please at all,” Trump said of his previous comments. “I just threw it away as a suggestion.”

But after the study, Trump said, “When that surface [where virus is present] outside, it goes away very quickly. He dies very quickly with the sun. ‘

A best practices image posted during the briefing stated that “Heat and humidity suppress Covid-19” and that they should “move activities outside” because “sunlight hampers virus transmission.”

It also noted that commonly available disinfectants, bleach and isopropyl alcohol, “work to kill the virus.”

Bryan said the government used the “unique ability of entities [his directorate’s] national biodefence analysis and countermeasure center to study the biology of the COVID-19 virus. ‘

He said the bio-containment lab in Frederick, Maryland, which was established after Anthrax attacks, conducted the study. He spoke of the “powerful effect that sunlight has on killing the virus.”

It may have a half-life of just 2 minutes in a day at 95 degrees with an 80 percent humidity, compared to 18 hours when the temperature was below 75 degrees with just 20 percent humidity. A half-life is the time it takes to halve the amount of virus.

A Homeland Security official later told reporters that federal laboratories are not considering the Trump-recommended treatment option, NBC reported.

The president’s daughter, Ivanka, also praised the study and sent a video clip. “DHS Secretary of Science William Bryan on how the #Coronavirus dies quickly when exposed to higher temperatures and sunlight, indicating that we will get some respite from the virus this summer,” she wrote.

The sunlight investigation brought Trump some confrontations with members of the press and also resulted in a briefing that did not discuss the US death toll nearing a critical milestone.

According to NBC, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention had to warn Americans not to use cleaning products last week.

“Calls to poison centers rose sharply in early March 2020 due to exposures to both detergents and disinfectants,” said the weekly report on morbidity and mortality.

The agency’s website says, “The FDA has received reports from consumers who have suffered from severe vomiting, severe diarrhea, life-threatening low blood pressure caused by dehydration, and acute liver failure after drinking these products.”

The United States was approaching 50,000 deaths at the time of the briefing, with fewer than 900,000 Americans infected.

Just one in four say they trust Donald Trump’s coronavirus information – and most think he’s not listening enough to health experts

Just over a quarter of Americans trust or listen regularly to President Trump’s information about the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new survey by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

More than half also believe Trump is not following sufficient advice from public health experts.

Trump has made himself a daily spokesperson for the country’s response to the coronavirus, but new figures suggest Americans are taking his updates with a grain of salt.

Only 28 percent of Americans said they regularly get information from Trump about the coronavirus.

And only 23 percent said they are very confident in what the president is telling the public. Another 21 percent trust him a modest amount.

Confidence in Trump is greater among his supporters, although only about half of Republicans said they had much confidence in Trump’s information about the pandemic – and 22 percent said they had little or no confidence in what he said about the COVID. 19 outbreak.

A new survey revealed that only 28 percent of Americans trust President Donald Trump’s (pictured) information about the coronavirus

But while many Republicans question Trump’s credibility during the pandemic, the vast majority of them – 82 percent – said they still approve of him.

That helped keep the President’s overall approval score at 42 percent, roughly where he has been in recent months.

Lynn Sanchez of Jacksonville, Texas, is one of those who support Trump despite reservations about his credibility.

Sanchez, who identifies as politically independent, said she trusts “just a little” on what the president said about the crisis, but believes he is “doing his best.”

“He’s contradicted his own health experts a few times. I believe he gets carried away and doesn’t settle down, ”says Sanchez, a 66-year-old retired truck stop manager.

The survey’s findings underscore Trump’s unwavering support from Republicans, who have remained steadfast throughout his presidency, despite reservations about his credibility and temperament.

If that support persists in the November elections, Trump would still have a narrow but achievable path to victory.

The findings also raise questions about the value of Trump’s daily briefings from the White House during the pandemic – televised events that often paint a sunny picture of the national pandemic response at odds with many Americans’ experiences in cities and states severely affected by the fast-moving virus.

While briefings are the White House’s primary tool for providing information to the public, they often end up in forums where the President can berate journalists and government critics.

Trump has personally led the briefings for weeks, with a regular cast of public health officials, cabinet secretaries, and vice president Mike Pence taking turns informing Americans of the government’s response to the health and economic crisis.

Many Americans said they wish Trump listened more to those experts as he navigated the crisis.

More specifically, 60 percent think Trump is not listening enough to health experts.

The leading public health officials who advise Trump, Drs. Anthony Fauci and Deborah Birx have advocated maintaining strict social distance measures, even as the President and some of his supporters insist on reopening the economy.

The survey found that the vast majority of Americans – 80 percent – continue to order Americans to stay at home, and a majority doubt it is safe to ease restrictions soon.

There is no indication that Trump is ready to move away from daily briefings. He regularly praises their television ratings, one of his favorite metrics for success.

And indeed, the briefings are still broadcast extensively every evening on the main cable news channels.

Still, this moment of national crisis, with more than 49,000 reported coronavirus deaths in the US and millions of Americans losing their jobs, has done nothing to broaden the appeal of the President.

It was reported that 4.4 million Americans filed new claims for unemployment benefits last week, according to the latest figures from the Labor Department.

Only 11 percent of the Democrat said they approve of Trump’s work as President. And 84 percent of Democrats have little to no confidence in the President’s information about the pandemic.

Pictured: A patient becomes Mt. Sinai Stuyvesant Hospital in Manhattan Thursday, as a new state test program suggests as many as one in five New Yorkers could be positive for coronavirus antibodies

Pictured: A patient becomes Mt. Sinai Stuyvesant Hospital in Manhattan Thursday, as a new state test program suggests as many as one in five New Yorkers could be positive for coronavirus antibodies

Pictured: A patient becomes Mt. Sinai Stuyvesant Hospital in Manhattan Thursday, as a new state test program suggests as many as one in five New Yorkers could be positive for coronavirus antibodies

The pandemic has changed the landscape for Trump’s reelection prospects in November when he will face Democrat Joe Biden.

The rapid spread of the virus throughout the country has turned the strong economy on which the President hoped to continue working.

It could also revise what qualities Americans seek from their commander in chief.

There are few statistics in which Trump ranks well with the majority of Americans, with only 17 percent of Americans saying Trump is very disciplined.

Regarding empathy – often an important intangible in presidential elections – 24 percent said Trump cares about people like her.

Trump’s highest rated trait is leadership. According to the survey, 32 percent of Americans said that a strong leader is a very good description of the president, along with 18 percent who said it describes him fairly well.

When it comes to the country’s response to the virus, Americans are more likely to trust and seek guidance from their state and local leaders than the President.

Ongeveer de helft van de ondervraagden zei regelmatig informatie te krijgen van staats- en lokale functionarissen en ongeveer hetzelfde bedrag zei een groot vertrouwen in die informatie te hebben.

En tot nu toe zei een meerderheid van de Amerikanen – 63 procent – dat ze goedkeuren hoe staten de uitbraak aanpakken, iets meer dan drie weken geleden.

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