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Australians will endure one of the worst summers in recent memory, while warm temperatures swirl above Antarctica in a very rare phenomenon

Why the strangest Antarctic weather for more than 25 years means that Australia will stand the summer from hell

  • Above average temperatures and less rainfall expected in the spring and summer
  • Sudden stratospheric warming to bring hot temperatures to the east of Australia
  • NSW and Brisbane experience warm weather, less rainfall and more forest fires
  • Both states have already been affected by various uncontrolled forest fires
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Australians will endure a summer from hell thanks to warm temperatures that swirl above Antarctica.

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Above average temperatures and less rainfall are expected in New South Wales and Queensland in the spring and summer, with experts explaining that the warm and dry conditions are bound to extremely rare conditions above the South Pole.

A report from four senior researchers at the Australian Bureau of Meteorology warns that sudden stratospheric warming will lead to hot temperatures in the east of the country.

Australians will endure one of the worst summers in recent memory, while warm temperatures swirl above Antarctica in a very rare phenomenon

Australians will endure one of the worst summers in recent memory, while warm temperatures swirl above Antarctica in a very rare phenomenon

Above average temperatures and less rainfall are expected in New South Wales and Queensland in spring and summer - forest fires are already burning out of hand in the states

Above average temperatures and less rainfall are expected in New South Wales and Queensland in spring and summer - forest fires are already burning out of hand in the states

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Above average temperatures and less rainfall are expected in New South Wales and Queensland in spring and summer – forest fires are already burning out of hand in the states

Sudden warming of the stratosphere is common in the northern hemisphere, but the only time it was recorded in the southern hemisphere was in 2002 (photo)

Sudden warming of the stratosphere is common in the northern hemisphere, but the only time it was recorded in the southern hemisphere was in 2002 (photo)

Sudden warming of the stratosphere is common in the northern hemisphere, but the only time it was recorded in the southern hemisphere was in 2002 (photo)

& # 39; Every winter, western winds – often up to 200 km per hour – develop in the stratosphere high above the South Pole and circle the polar region, & # 39; the report is reading.

& # 39; The wind develops as a result of the temperature difference over the pole (where there is no sunlight) and the Southern Ocean (where the sun is still shining).

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& # 39; While the sun is moving south in the spring, the polar region is starting to heat up. This warming ensures that the stratospheric vortex and associated western winds gradually subside over a period of a few months.

& # 39; Very rarely, if the waves are strong enough, they can quickly break the polar vertebra and reverse the wind direction so that they become eastward. & # 39;

Sudden warming of the stratosphere occurs when the temperature rises rapidly in the upper atmosphere in just a few days.

They are common in the northern hemisphere, but the only time the southern hemisphere phenomenon was registered was in 2002.

This caused the fourth driest winter in Australia ever due to the sudden warming of the stratosphere.

Experts say that the hot and dry conditions are tied to extremely rare conditions above the South Pole
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Experts say that the hot and dry conditions are tied to extremely rare conditions above the South Pole

Experts say that the hot and dry conditions are tied to extremely rare conditions above the South Pole

Australia registered the fourth driest winter due to sudden stratospheric warming in 2002

Australia registered the fourth driest winter due to sudden stratospheric warming in 2002

Australia registered the fourth driest winter due to sudden stratospheric warming in 2002

NSW and Queensland will see above-average temperatures, less rainfall, cloudless skies and are more prone to forest fires in the coming weeks

NSW and Queensland will see above-average temperatures, less rainfall, cloudless skies and are more prone to forest fires in the coming weeks

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NSW and Queensland will see above-average temperatures, less rainfall, cloudless skies and are more prone to forest fires in the coming weeks

Harry Hendon from the Meteorology Bureau said there have been a few events that have come close to sudden stratospheric warming.

& # 39; Over the past 30 years, we have probably had five or six incidents that did not fully qualify & # 39 ;, he said ABC.

& # 39; We have looked at what happened during that period and we are pretty sure that in the coming months we will see an increase in temperatures and a fall in precipitation in Middle East Australia. & # 39 ;

NSW and Queensland were hit by a number of uncontrolled forest fires two weeks ago.

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& # 39; The effects of this stratospheric warming are likely to reach the Earth's surface in the coming month and possibly extend to January & # 39 ;, wrote the meteorologists.

Both states will see above-average temperatures, less rainfall, cloudless skies in the coming weeks and will be more prone to forest fires.

Queensland has already experienced temperatures of 30 degrees in the first two weeks of spring.

FIVE DAY WEATHER FORECAST

SYDNEY

WEDNESDAY: Min 9. Max 20. Sunny.

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THURSDAY: Min 9. Max 25. Mostly sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 13. Max 21. Mostly sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 11. Max 21. Rabbit.

SUNDAY: Min 10. Max 26. Sunny.

BRISBANE:

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WEDNESDAY: Min 11. Max 23. Partly Cloudy.

THURSDAY: Min 11. Max 25. Sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 11. Max 30. Sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 13. Max 28. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 13. Max 26. Most sunny.

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ADELAIDE:

WEDNESDAY: Min 8. Max 22. Sunny.

THURSDAY: Min 13. Max 20. Sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 8. Max 18. Partly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 9. Max 23. Sunny.

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SUNDAY: Min 13. Max 22. Partly cloudy.

PERTH:

WEDNESDAY: Min 13. Max 24. Partly cloudy.

THURSDAY: Min 11. Max 25. Mostly sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 11. Max 25. Mostly sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 13. Max 24. Partly cloudy.

SUNDAY: Min 11. Max 22. Partly Cloudy.

MELBOURNE:

WEDNESDAY: Min 5. Max 20. Sunny.

THURSDAY: Min. 12. Max. 19. Some showers.

FRIDAY: Min 7. Max 17. Partly cloudy.

SATURDAY: Min 9. Max 20. Mostly sunny.

SUNDAY: Min. 12. Max. 21. Shower or two.

CANBERRA:

WEDNESDAY: Min -2. Max 18. Sunny.

THURSDAY: Min 1. Max 18. Partly cloudy.

FRIDAY: Min 0. Max 21. Sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 1. Max 21. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 0. Max 23. Sunny.

DARWIN:

WEDNESDAY: Min 20. Max 32. Sunny.

THURSDAY: Min 20. Max 32. Sunny.

FRIDAY: Min 20. Max 32. Sunny.

SATURDAY: Min 20. Max 32. Sunny.

SUNDAY: Min 20. Max 31. Sunny.

HOBART:

WEDNESDAY: Min 7. Max 21. Becoming windy. Partly cloudy.

THURSDAY: Min 12. Max 17. Morning showers. Lighten the wind.

FRIDAY: Min 6. Max 15. Shower or two.

SATURDAY: Min 7. Max 19. Possible shower.

SUNDAY: Min. 11. Max. 18. Shower or two.

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