The very first direct image of the dusty ring of a black hole around a black hole is taken

The very first direct image of the dusty & # 39; torus ring & # 39; scientists are being captured around a super-massive black hole

  • Cygnus A is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky and was portrayed by VLA
  • It is around 800 million light years away and spreads radio waves
  • Images show the dusty ring – or torus – that encircles the huge black hole

Astronomers have taken the very first direct image of a dusty donut floating around a super heavy black hole.

The ring – known as a torus – was depicted around the black hole in the center of Cygnus A, one of the most powerful radio star systems in the universe.

Most galaxies have a black hole in the core that pulls debris into its orbit, which then turns in circles and spins around the center of a disk.

Part of this material falls into the black hole, which fuels the huge black hole and causes the huge rays of plasma to shoot off.

Direct images were previously impossible due to the incredible gravity of black holes that suck in everything – even light.

Astronomers have taken the very first direct image of a dusty donut revolving around a super-heavy black hole (artist & # 39; s impression, pictured). The ring - known as a torus - was depicted around the core of Cygnus A, one of the most powerful radio star systems in the universe

Astronomers have taken the very first direct image of a dusty donut revolving around a super-heavy black hole (artist & # 39; s impression, pictured). The ring – known as a torus – was depicted around the core of Cygnus A, one of the most powerful radio star systems in the universe

WHAT ARE RADIO GALAXIES?

Radio systems make powerful radio rays jump out of the super heavy black holes in their centers.

They usually consist of two rays that are emitted from a large elliptical system.

Radio stars are very luminous at radio wavelengths, making them easily recognizable with a radio telescope.

This then makes useful tools for studying the structure of the universe.

Cygnus A is about 800 million light-years away and is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky.

The black hole in the center of this galaxy has a mass of about the same as 2.5 billion suns.

Images of the ultra-clear emissions came thanks to the astronomers using the Very Large Array (VLA) telescope.

The image contributes to a growing mindset that claims that these dust-covered black holes, collectively known as active galactic nuclei (AGN), form the center of enormously powerful galaxies.

& # 39; The torus is an essential part of the AGN phenomenon and there is evidence for such structures in nearby AGN with lower brightness, but we have never seen this directly before in such a clear radiant milk system & # 39 says Chris Carilli from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO).

Observations from the VLA reveal the gas in the torus around the huge black hole of Cygnus A (pictured). Cygnus A is about 800 million light-years away and is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky

Observations from the VLA reveal the gas in the torus around the huge black hole of Cygnus A (pictured). Cygnus A is about 800 million light-years away and is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky

Observations from the VLA reveal the gas in the torus around the huge black hole of Cygnus A (pictured). Cygnus A is about 800 million light-years away and is one of the brightest radio sources in the sky

& # 39; The torus helps explain why objects that appear under different names are actually the same, are only perceived from a different perspective. & # 39;

Observations from the VLA reveal the gas in the torus around Cygnus A & # 39; s huge black hole.

& # 39; Cygnus A is the closest example of a powerful radio-emitting galaxy, ten times closer than any other with a similarly powerful radio emission & # 39 ;, said Rick Perley of the NRAO.

& # 39; That proximity enabled us to find the torus in a high resolution VLA image of the core of the galaxy.

WHAT ARE BLACK HOLES?

Black holes are so dense and their gravity is so strong that no form of radiation can escape – not even light.

They act as intense sources of gravity that sweat dust and gas around them.

Their intense gravity is supposed to be what stars revolve in galaxies.

How they are formed is still poorly understood.

Supermassive black holes are incredibly dense areas in the center of galaxies with masses that can be billions of times that of the sun. They cause dips in space-time (artist & # 39; s impression) and even light cannot escape their appeal

Supermassive black holes are incredibly dense areas in the center of galaxies with masses that can be billions of times that of the sun. They cause dips in space-time (artist & # 39; s impression) and even light cannot escape their appeal

Supermassive black holes are incredibly dense areas in the center of galaxies with masses that can be billions of times that of the sun. They cause dips in space-time (artist & # 39; s impression) and even light cannot escape their appeal

Astronomers believe that they can form as a large gas cloud up to 100,000 times larger than the sun falls into a black hole.

Many of these black hole seeds then merge into much larger super-heavy black holes, which are located in the center of any known massive galaxy.

Alternatively, a super heavy black hole seed can come from a giant star, about 100 times the mass of the sun, which eventually turns into a black hole after it runs out of fuel and collapses.

When these giant stars die, they also go to & # 39; supernova & # 39 ;, a huge explosion that drives the matter from the outer layers of the star into the deep space.

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