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An advertisement for a liquid vape company is prohibited after it gave the wrong impression that the products were endorsed by Olympic hero Sir Mo Farah

The advertisement of the vapenbedrijf is PROHIBITED to give a false impression after & # 39; that his menthol products were approved by the Olympic hero Sir Mo Farah

  • The Diamond Mist vape ad included the caption: & # 39; Mo & # 39; s Mad for Menthol & # 39;
  • Sir Mo went to social media in March to make it clear that it had nothing to do with him
  • People complained that it was misleading for the Advertising Standards Authority
  • In a statement published today, the watchdog concluded that the advertisement violated the code
  • It said it probably gave the wrong impression that the products had been approved by Sir Mo.
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An advertisement for a liquid vampa company is prohibited after it gave a false impression that the products were approved by the Olympic hero Sir Mo Farah.

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A bus stop poster for the Diamond Mist company contained an image of the eyes, eyebrows, and bald head of someone who was very similar to the gold medal winner alongside a caption with the text: & # 39; Mo & # 39; s Mad for Menthol & # 39 ;.

When the poster appeared in April and May this year, people complained that it was misleading for the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA).

Sir Mo himself went to social media to make it clear that the advertisement had nothing to do with him.

An advertisement for a liquid vape company is prohibited after it gave the wrong impression that the products were endorsed by Olympic hero Sir Mo Farah

An advertisement for a liquid vape company is prohibited after it gave the wrong impression that the products were endorsed by Olympic hero Sir Mo Farah

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In a statement published today, the watchdog said: “We noticed that Sir Mo Farah had tweeted about the ad and said he is not in it and has not approved the product.

& # 39; In general, we felt that the advertisement would probably give the consumer the misleading impression that the product had been approved by Sir Mo Farah. We therefore concluded that the advertisement was in violation of the code. & # 39;

It said the poster exceeded rules regarding misleading advertising, notes and testimonials.

In addition to banning the advertisement, it told the company that it should not imply that Sir Mo, or any other person, would have approved their products if not.

Sir Mo himself went to social media in March to make it clear that the advertisement had nothing to do with him

Sir Mo himself went to social media in March to make it clear that the advertisement had nothing to do with him

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Sir Mo himself went to social media in March to make it clear that the advertisement had nothing to do with him

The advertisement contained an image of the eyes, eyebrows, and bald head of someone who was very similar to the gold medalist next to a caption with the text: & # 39; Mo & # 39; s Mad for Menthol & # 39;

The advertisement contained an image of the eyes, eyebrows, and bald head of someone who was very similar to the gold medalist next to a caption with the text: & # 39; Mo & # 39; s Mad for Menthol & # 39;

The advertisement contained an image of the eyes, eyebrows, and bald head of someone who was very similar to the gold medalist next to a caption with the text: & # 39; Mo & # 39; s Mad for Menthol & # 39;

In defense, the company said the marketing campaign was designed to appeal to a large number of people, including all sexes and ethnic groups, and claimed that the model used had a different skin color than the real famous athlete.

The posters of the vapenbedrijf appeared on buses in London. When the posters first appeared, Sir Mo tweeted: & # 39; Maybe you saw this ad and I think it's me !! I can assure you that I have NOT subscribed to this product or company !!!! & # 39;

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His spokesman said: "We are pleased that the ASA has considered the Diamond Mist advertisement misleading and could have led members of the public to believe that Sir Mo Farah had approved the sheep farm."

What is an e-cigarette and how does it differ from smoking tobacco?

An electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) is a device that allows users to inhale nicotine by heating a vapor from a solution containing nicotine, propylene and flavorings.

Because there is no burning, there is no smoke like a traditional cigarette.

But although they are branded as a lower risk than cigarettes, an increasing stream of investigations shows health hazards.

E-cigarettes do not produce tar or carbon monoxide, but the vapor does contain some harmful chemicals.

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Nicotine is the highly addictive chemical that makes it difficult for smokers to quit.

Nearly three million people in the UK use e-cigarettes and more than nine million Americans.

TYPES:

1. Standard e-cigarette

Battery-powered device containing nicotine e-liquid.

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It evaporates flavored nicotine liquid.

2. Juul

Very similar to normal e-cigarettes, but with a slimmer design and a higher concentration of nicotine.

Thanks to the & # 39; nicotine salts & # 39; manufacturers claim that one pod delivers the amount of nicotine as a pack of cigarettes.

It consists of an e-cigarette (battery and temperature control) and a pod e-liquid that is introduced at the end.

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The liquid contains nicotine, chemicals and flavorings.

Like other evaporation devices, it evaporates the e-liquid.

3. IQOS by Philip Morris

Pen-shaped, charged like an iPod.

Evaporated tobacco.

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It is known as a & # 39; heat not burn & # 39; smokeless device that heats but does not burn tobacco (at 350 ° C compared to 600 ° C as normal cigarettes do).

The company claims that this method reduces the exposure of users to carcinogenic burning tobacco.

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