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The Utah police ends the investigation into the death of the man whose wife kept his body in the freezer

The Utah police have ended their investigation into the death of a man whose body was found in a freezer alongside a notarial letter stating that his wife was not responsible.

Tooele City police published a report on the mysterious case of Paul Edward Mathers on Wednesday, almost three months after his corpse was discovered in a freezer in his wife Jeanne Sourone-Mathers’ apartment minutes after she herself died.

The department announced that the investigation was closed because, as Sgt Jeremy Hansen said, “we will never get definitive answers.”

A report contained the typed letter in which Mathers wrote: “I want to know that Jeanne is in no way responsible for my death.”

The letter, signed by a notary, dates from 2 December 2008.

Police say Mathers seemed to have died somewhere between February 4, 2009 – when the then 63-year-old was last seen in a veteran hospital – and March 8, 2009.

Researchers suspected early on that the couple could have kept Mathers’ death a secret so that his wife could continue to receive his VA checks. Police said she had $ 177,325 from the federal agency in between the death of her husband and hers.

But exactly how Mathers died and his body ended up in the freezer might never be answered.

The Utah police announced Wednesday that they had terminated their investigation into the death of Paul Edward Mathers, whose body was found in a freezer alongside a notarial letter stating that his wife, Jeanne Sourone-Mathers, was not responsible. The letter is shown in full above

The Utah police announced Wednesday that they had terminated their investigation into the death of Paul Edward Mathers, whose body was found in a freezer alongside a notarial letter stating that his wife, Jeanne Sourone-Mathers, was not responsible. The letter is shown in full above

The bizarre case began on November 22 when the police carried out a welfare check on Sourone-Mathers in the Remington Park Apartments (photo) in Tooele and found the 75-year-old death by natural causes. Officers searched the house for clues as to how long she had died when they discovered the body of her deceased husband in the freezer

The bizarre case began on November 22 when the police carried out a welfare check on Sourone-Mathers in the Remington Park Apartments (photo) in Tooele and found the 75-year-old death by natural causes. Officers searched the house for clues as to how long she had died when they discovered the body of her deceased husband in the freezer

The bizarre case began on November 22 when the police carried out a welfare check on Sourone-Mathers in the Remington Park Apartments (photo) in Tooele and found the 75-year-old death by natural causes. Officers searched the house for clues as to how long she had died when they discovered the body of her deceased husband in the freezer

The bizarre case began on November 22 when the police carried out a welfare check on Sourone-Mathers in the Remington Park Apartments and found the 75-year-old dead. She was determined to have died of natural causes.

Officers searched the house for clues as to how long Sourone-Mathers had been dead when they discovered the body of her deceased husband in the freezer.

Mathers was diagnosed with terminal bladder cancer, but the authorities could not conclude whether that killed him.

An autopsy from the Utah State Medical Examiner’s Office noted that Mathers lived only weeks to months in the early weeks.

It is also noted that he had “very deadly levels of various prescribed drugs” in his system.

Mathers’ head was wrapped in a garbage bag that was “taped tightly around his neck,” but it was unclear whether the bag was secured before or after his death.

Neither could officials ascertain whether Sourone-Mathers, who used a wheelchair, had put the bag over her husband’s head because “no latent prints of comparable value” had been removed from the plastic.

Even if she did not help with his death, it was still illegal that she did not report it and kept the body in the freezer.

But Mathers intended to clear his wife of any misconduct in his death, according to the notarial letter, which reads:

‘I, Paul E. Mathers, also known as Paula, have a relatively healthy mind and a cancer-ridden body and make the following statement: I am fully aware that with my heart condition the Lortabs / Hydrocodine will eventually stop my heart . It will not be intentional because I am not ready to leave my wife, Jeanne Marie.

“Jeanne has thwarted my actual suicide attempts.

“I want to know that Jeanne is in no way responsible for my death. Although that will be what my drama queen mother will claim. My mother … can continue her life without having to acknowledge that I am her firstborn T.G. ”

Police band is seen outside the door of Sourone-Mathers apartment after both she and her husband were discovered dead on November 22

Police band is seen outside the door of Sourone-Mathers apartment after both she and her husband were discovered dead on November 22

Police band is seen outside the door of Sourone-Mathers apartment after both she and her husband were discovered dead on November 22

The last sentence of the letter provides a possible explanation for another main question in the case: why other family members are not concerned about the fact that they have not seen or heard Mathers for years.

The police said there were indications that Mathers had an alienated relationship with his family, including the mother he mentioned in the note.

Researchers could not confirm what he meant by “T.G.” but said the initials could stand for transgender, which would explain why he called himself “Paula.”

If that is the case, it would indicate that Mathers was arguing with his mother because of his gender identity.

The mother died in January 2018, Hansen said, and the police could never check whether Mathers was transgender.

Sourone-Mathers allegedly kept her husband’s death under control by telling people that he had left her.

On March 5, 2009, Mathers’ sister visited Sourone-Mathers, who claimed that her husband had moved to California.

Evan Kline, who works in the retirement community where Sourone-Mathers lived, said she had told the same story to others in the community.

Speaking to Fox13 in December, Kline described Sourone-Mathers as a “very nice person” who “wouldn’t hurt a fly.”

He said that she did not receive dialysis treatments shortly before her death, so it was no shock to him.

However, he was very surprised to hear that Mathers’ body was found at home.

My jaw hit the floor when I found out, “he said.

“Based on what I know now, I should say it was probably the plan, yes, that she would keep the money because it was her only source of income,” Kline said. “I think you can call it a bit smart – but crooks are often smart.”

Evan Kline, who works in the pension community where Sourone-Mathers lived, spoke to Fox13 about the case in December. Kline told the outlet that the 75-year-old resident had told people that her husband left her

Evan Kline, who works in the pension community where Sourone-Mathers lived, spoke to Fox13 about the case in December. Kline told the outlet that the 75-year-old resident had told people that her husband left her

Evan Kline, who works in the pension community where Sourone-Mathers lived, spoke to Fox13 about the case in December. Kline told the outlet that the 75-year-old resident had told people that her husband left her

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