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The use of Facebook generates stress that can help people supplement the social media site, researchers have warned. Instead of avoiding social media, stressed Facebook users switch to other activities on the site - such as sending messages, viewing feeds or posting

Facebook's vicious circle: regular use of social media causes people to become stressed and then addicted to the sites

  • Experts studied the behavior and stress responses of 444 Facebook users
  • When it emphasizes them, users are less likely to log out of Facebook more often
  • Instead, they switch to a different type of activity on the social networking site
  • This extends their time on social media and increases the risk of addiction
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Regular use of social media sites such as Instagram, Twitter and Facebook can cause huge amounts of stress which, according to scientists, can lead to addiction to the sites.

Social networking platforms are known as & # 39; technostress & # 39; generate with users.

This is not sufficient for users to demolish the site, but often causes users to use the site in a slightly different way instead.

If this next activity causes more stress, the person simply switches back to another social media promotion, browse the news feed, messages etc.

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This vicious circle then increases the risk that these people get involved in an internet web and become addicted.

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The use of Facebook generates stress that can help people supplement the social media site, researchers have warned. Instead of avoiding social media, stressed Facebook users switch to other activities on the site - such as sending messages, viewing feeds or posting

The use of Facebook generates stress that can help people supplement the social media site, researchers have warned. Instead of avoiding social media, stressed Facebook users switch to other activities on the site – such as sending messages, viewing feeds or posting

WHAT SHAPE DOES TECHNOSTRESS TAKE?

The researchers looked at various forms of technostress, including:

  • The feeling that social media penetrated the lives of users.
  • Experience excessive social demands.
  • Being flooded with too much social information.
  • Users feel the need to change how they use social media to adapt to that of their friends.
  • Adjustment to frequent changes to the social networking site itself.

IT and management expert Monideepa Tarafdar of Lancaster University and colleagues explored the habits of 444 Facebook users.

They looked at various forms of techno-stress that could be caused by the use of social media – including the feeling that the sites invaded users' lives, that users were receiving too much information, and that the site was constantly changing.

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In addition, the team has also investigated two different principal approaches to dealing with technostress from social networks.

The first involved users looking for social media redirects themselves – such as by logging out of Facebook, spending less time on the platform, or discussing the sources of their stress with friends or family.

The other reaction – which, according to the researchers, is more frequent among frequent Facebook users – concerned redirection through various activities within the same social network platform.

& # 39; Although it seems counter-intuitive, social media users continue to use the same platforms that cause stress instead of shutting them down, "said Professor Tarafdar.

This, she added, creates & # 39; a blur between the stress caused and the forced use & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; Because social networking sites offer such a wide range of functions, users may find that they act both as stressors and as a derivation of that stress, "added paper co-author Christian Maier of the University of Bamberg, Germany.

& # 39; Even when users are stressed by the use of social networking sites, they use the same platforms to deal with that stress, distract themselves from other activities on the [sites] and ultimately build up compulsive and excessive behavior. & # 39;

& # 39; As a result, they anchor themselves in the social network environment instead of getting away from it and an addiction is created. & # 39;

Monideepa Tarafdar of Lancaster University and colleagues & # 39; s studied the habits of 444 Facebook users and looked at different forms of & # 39; technostress & # 39; and user responses

Monideepa Tarafdar of Lancaster University and colleagues & # 39; s studied the habits of 444 Facebook users and looked at different forms of & # 39; technostress & # 39; and user responses

Monideepa Tarafdar of Lancaster University and colleagues & # 39; s studied the habits of 444 Facebook users and looked at different forms of & # 39; technostress & # 39; and user responses

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& # 39; We discovered that users with greater social media habits needed less effort to find another aspect of the platforms, & # 39; noted co-author Sven Laumer of the Dr. Theo and Friedl Schöller Research Center.

& # 39; Users go to different parts of the platform that they consider separate and use in different ways. & # 39;

& # 39; With Facebook there are features that take you to different worlds within the same platform. & # 39;

& # 39; The idea of ​​using the same environment that causes stress as a means of dealing with that stress is new, & # 39; concluded Professor Tarafdar.

& # 39; It is an interesting phenomenon that appears to be distinctive for technostress from social media. & # 39;

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The full findings of the study were published in the Information Systems Journal.

HOW DO YOU CHECK HOW MANY TIME YOU GIVE TO FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM?

Facebook and Instagram users can now keep track of how much time they spend in the app, thanks to new tools designed to improve your digital health.

The new function can be found in the settings menu of each app.

For Facebook users on iOS, tap the three-line symbol in the lower right corner of the app to launch the settings menu.

Android users must tap the same symbol, but find it at the top right.

Scroll through the settings menu and tap the option & # 39; Your Time on Facebook & # 39 ;.

For Instagram, users must load the settings page and then scroll down to the & # 39; Your Activity & # 39; option.

Both apps contain a breakdown of the exact number of minutes you have spent on Facebook and Instagram with a specific device.

This data is presented in the style of a bar chat, where users can tap on a bar to see the total time they have spent for that particular day.

Further down the page, Facebook and Instagram retract the option to set a daily reminder that sends a warning after you've reached the amount of time you want to spend on the app that day.

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You can change or cancel the reminder at any time by returning to the same settings menu.

In the same settings menu on Instagram and Facebook you can go to & # 39; Notification Settings & # 39; tap to access an updated tool & # 39; Mute push notifications & # 39 ;.

This allows you to silence all notifications from the social network app during a predetermined period.

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