The use of passive-aggressive language and sarcasm by British is LOST by Americans, survey-finds

& # 39; You MUST come to eat once … & # 39 ;: Britons use passive-aggressive language and sarcasm is LOST Americans, survey-finds

  • Americans & # 39; often interpret passive-aggressive subtext in British phrases & # 39;
  • Expressions like & # 39; I keep it in mind & # 39; were shown to two groups in the YouGov survey
  • But when he was asked how they interpreted it, there was a big difference in perception

Faith Ridler for Mailonline

Americans often have trouble understanding the use of sarcasm and passive-aggressive language by Britons, according to a study.

Common phrases like & # 39; I will keep it in mind & # 39; and & # 39; with the utmost respect & # 39; were shown to Britons and Americans last month by YouGov Omnibus.

But when the two groups were asked how they interpreted the phrases, there was a big difference in comprehension.

According to a tweet from YouGov, half of Americans would not know that a Brit calls them an idiot & # 39 ;.

Common phrases like & # 39; I will keep it in mind & # 39; and & # 39; with the utmost respect & # 39; YouGov Omnibus were shown to Britons and Americans

Common phrases like & # 39; I will keep it in mind & # 39; and & # 39; with the utmost respect & # 39; YouGov Omnibus were shown to Britons and Americans

The most significant variation came with the expression & # 39; with the greatest respect & # 39 ;.

About 68 percent of Britons believed that this means "I think you're an idiot," while 49 percent of Americans interpreted it as "I'm listening to you."

A similar discrepancy was revealed with the phrase "I hear what you're saying."

About 48 percent of the 1,729 Britons questioned thought that the expression "I do not agree with it and I do not want to talk about it" & # 39; but 58 percent of the 1,952 Americans heard & # 39; I accept your opinion.

But when the groups were then asked how they interpreted the phrases, there was a big difference in understanding

But when the groups were then asked how they interpreted the phrases, there was a big difference in understanding

But when the groups were then asked how they interpreted the phrases, there was a big difference in understanding

When the sentence you should come to eat & # 39; is shown, more than half of the British believed that it was only a polite gesture.

On the other hand, 41 percent of Americans would expect an invitation by mail.

& # 39; Although not all sentences show a difference in transatlantic understanding, there are some statements in which many Yanks run the risk of missing the serious passive aggression that we use British, & # 39; YouGov said.

The research is inspired by a popular meme that was distributed in 2013 by Buzzfeed.

The YouGov Omnibus survey is inspired by a popular meme distributed by Buzzfeed in 2013

The YouGov Omnibus survey is inspired by a popular meme distributed by Buzzfeed in 2013

The YouGov Omnibus survey is inspired by a popular meme distributed by Buzzfeed in 2013

The table showed a series of phrases in the form of what the British say & # 39 ;, & # 39; What the British mean & # 39; and & # 39; What others understand & # 39 ;.

Each of the 15 stated expressions was shown to the groups next to two possible interpretations and & # 39; do not know & # 39 ;.

Respondents were then asked to choose the option that they thought most resembled their own perception.

But although the results were not entirely accurate, the survey showed that most of the stereotypes listed on the table were indeed correct.

For example, most British and Americans asked, believed & # 39; I was a bit disappointed by that & # 39; to say: "I am annoyed about that."

The majority of both groups also interpreted & # 39; very interesting & # 39; if & # 39; I am impressed & # 39 ;.

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