WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

The U.S. Army UU. I could add & # 39; smart reach & # 39; to their new rifles that will fire if there is a guaranteed shot

The U.S. Army UU. I could add & # 39; smart reach & # 39; to their new rifles that will only allow soldiers to fire if the computer guarantees that they will hit the target

  • The SMASH system uses a computer to determine if a shot is guaranteed
  • The technology uses an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip
  • Shooter aligns its goal in scope or technology does it for them
  • Once the target is marked, the information is sent back to a computer
  • The automatic tracking system can be deactivated for other types of shooting.

The U.S. Army UU. You are evaluating a new & # 39; smart reach & # 39; for rifles that only fire when the software determines a & # 39; guaranteed shot & # 39 ;.

Using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip, the shooter marks his target with a red rectangle using the telescope, which is sent to a computer that decides if it is a perfect shot.

Technology not only helps the shooter with greater precision, but its main objective is to reduce the lost bullets that hit civilians in the area.

The shooter & # 39; acquires, blocks and attacks the targets & # 39; using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip.

If the Army decides to move forward with technology, it could be deployed in the field by 2023.

Scroll down to watch videos

Using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip, the shooter marks his target with a small red rectangle using the scope, which is sent back to a computer that decides if the shot will hit

Using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip, the shooter marks his target with a small red rectangle using the scope, which is sent back to a computer that decides if the shot will hit

The rifle, called SMASH Fire Control System, was developed in collaboration between Israel-based Sig Sauer, and Smart Shooter.

It is a presentation in the fire control competition of the Next Generation Squadron Weapon of the military organization, Military.com reported.

The technology "is designed to help improve the accuracy of any shooter that meets fixed or mobile targets in both day and night conditions," said Devin Schweiss of Smart Shooter Inc.

The SMASH system incorporates night vision, magnification and detection and tracking of objectives.

Technology not only helps the shooter with greater precision, but its main objective is to prevent lost bullets from hitting civilians in the area. The shooter & # 39; acquires, blocks and attacks the targets & # 39; using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip

Technology not only helps the shooter with greater precision, but its main objective is to reduce the lost bullets that hit civilians in the area. The shooter & # 39; acquires, blocks and attacks the targets & # 39; using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip

Technology not only helps the shooter with greater precision, but its main objective is to prevent lost bullets from hitting civilians in the area. The shooter & # 39; acquires, blocks and attacks the targets & # 39; using an optics mounted on a weapon and a special pistol grip

According to Military.com, the system uses a sight that hooks over the barrel and a special pistol grip.

The targets are automatically detected when the shooter presses a button next to the handle, which projects red squares around it.

Pressing a button next to the handle automatically detects the possible targets, projecting red squares around it in the field of view.

The shooter then presses the trigger and keeps it pressed.

The weapon will fire when the barrel is correctly aligned with the target, causing a "guaranteed hit."

However, the automatic tracking system can be deactivated for other types of shooting.

If the Army decides to move forward with technology, it could be deployed in the field by 2023

If the Army decides to move forward with technology, it could be deployed in the field by 2023

If the Army decides to move forward with technology, it could be deployed in the field by 2023

The targets are automatically detected when the shooter presses a button next to the handle, which projects red squares around it.

The Army constantly seeks to incorporate better technologies to give its soldiers on the battlefield.

Recently, the military organization tested a different intelligent rifle that aims automatically.

It uses an integrated computer to aim at a target, and can even & # 39; block & # 39; the main objectives and track them automatically.

The system includes a computer with Linux in range with sensors that collect images and ballistic data, such as atmospheric conditions, tilt, tilt, even the slight change in the Earth's rotation known as the Coriolis effect.

The shooter uses a laser rangefinder that looks through the viewfinder to identify the target you want to reach.

The high-tech vision takes into account the humidity, the wind and the typical ballistic fall that you would expect from a bullet fired at that distance.

Once the target has been selected, the endoscope provides a reticle that must align with the pin that is dropped on the target.

To ensure accuracy, the shooter cannot even pull the trigger unless the cross and pin are aligned.

.