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The two Australian vaccines that could defeat the coronavirus for good and how they will work

The two Australian vaccines that could defeat the coronavirus forever and how they will work

  • 120 volunteers received a vaccine from the University of Queensland
  • The human trials for a different vaccine started at Royal Adelaide Hospital
  • Test with a unique formula that contains a chemical that helps the body destroy the virus
  • Trials are amid 2,128 active cases in Australia and 116 deaths from the virus

Two teams of Australian scientists are among the leaders in the global race to find a vaccine for COVID-19.

Researchers from the University of Queensland and the Royal Adelaide Hospital both progressed to clinical trials this month – a milestone in the search for a drug that can neutralize the virus.

In Brisbane, 120 volunteers received their first dose of a possible COVID-19 vaccine made by the University of Queensland on Monday.

Human trials in Adelaide, meanwhile, began on July 2 with early reports showing that the unique formula made from a chemical called ‘adjuvant’ makes it easier for the human body to destroy the coronavirus protein.

In Brisbane, 120 volunteers on Monday received their first dose of a possible COVID-19 vaccine - developed by the University of Queensland (photo)

In Brisbane, 120 volunteers on Monday received their first dose of a possible COVID-19 vaccine – developed by the University of Queensland (photo)

The University of Queensland’s potential vaccine was created using a special ‘molecular clamp’ technology that fuses a synthetic COVID-19 spike protein.

Project director of UQ’s coronavirus vaccine program Professor Trent Munro said their approach is designed to make the body think it has the coronavirus.

He hopes the vaccine will trigger an immune response that will make the human body better prepared for the real coronavirus.

“If the virus is floating around in your system and your immune system is trying to recognize it, the peak protein is the first molecule it encounters and triggers an immune response,” he said. The New Daily.

“We want to imitate that with our vaccine.”

Human trials of another potential vaccine began at Royal Adelaide Hospital on July 2 with early reports showing promising results

Human trials of another potential vaccine began at Royal Adelaide Hospital on July 2 with early reports showing promising results

Human trials of another potential vaccine began at Royal Adelaide Hospital on July 2 with early reports showing promising results

Vaccine trial co-leader Paul Young said the phase 1 study will assess vaccine safety and immune responses.

If clinical trials are successful and approved by health regulators, pharmaceutical company CSL will produce ‘hundreds of millions’ of doses of the drug by 2021.

“As with any vaccine trial, this may or may not work,” said Mr. Young.

“It is not a guarantee, but we are confident that we will achieve a positive result.”

The trials take place amid 2,128 active cases of coronavirus in Australia and as the death toll rises to 116 people nationally

The trials take place amid 2,128 active cases of coronavirus in Australia and as the death toll rises to 116 people nationally

The trials take place amid 2,128 active cases of coronavirus in Australia and as the death toll rises to 116 people nationally

UNIVERSITY OF PIONEERS ‘MOLECULAR CLAMP’ TECHNOLOGY OF QUEENSLAND FIGHT AGAINST COVID-19

The university received a request from the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations to use its newly-patented DNA-based molecular clamp technology to accelerate the vaccine after the virus hit the coasts of Australia in January.

A team of 20 researchers has prepared for a ‘rapid response’ in the past 15 months.

The technology uses the DNA sequence of the coronavirus released by China to produce a protein that is the same as that on the surface of the actual virus.

That protein will be the essence of the vaccine, capable of generating immune system responses that protect people.

The vaccine was developed using molecular clamp technology that locks the 'spike' protein in a shape

The vaccine was developed using molecular clamp technology that locks the 'spike' protein in a shape

The vaccine was developed using molecular clamp technology that locks the ‘spike’ protein in a shape

Prime Minister Annastacia Palaszczuk, Queensland, said the vaccine could deliver “millions, if not billions” of dollars to Australia.

Researchers in Adelaide have also used a synthetic coronavirus peak in their vaccine.

Instead of using a molecular clamp, the researchers decided to use ‘inulin’ that comes from the Belgian endive plant.

Vaxine research director, Professor Nikolai Petrovsky, said that inulin purified from the plant turns into a white powder that resembles sugar.

“By making inulin in these special microscopic particles, they can activate the immune system and act as a turbocharger to make it more responsive to vaccines, giving them stronger protection,” said Professor Petrovsky.

He said this vaccine may not have side effects in the past like other vaccines.

“Using synthetic proteins with our plant-based inulin adjuvant to elicit strong protective immune responses to pandemic viruses is something we’ve done many times in animal and human trials over the past 15 years, so we know it works.

Drug company CSL will produce 'hundreds of millions' doses of the drug from the University of Queensland by 2021 if it gets approval from authorities

Drug company CSL will produce 'hundreds of millions' doses of the drug from the University of Queensland by 2021 if it gets approval from authorities

Drug company CSL will produce ‘hundreds of millions’ doses of the drug from the University of Queensland by 2021 if it gets approval from authorities

While the world is waiting for an effective vaccine, the American miracle drug Remdesivir has been given the green light to become the first approved treatment for COVID-19 in Australia.

The drug – the only major treatment worldwide to receive approval for the new coronavirus since the onset of the pandemic – has received preliminary approval for use in hospitalized patients with severe cases of fatal respiratory disease.

The Therapeutic Goods Administration said that Remdesivir would reduce the burden on the Australian health care system and help hospital patients recover faster.

“Remdesivir provides an opportunity to reduce pressure on the Australian health care system,” the national therapeutic goods regulator said in a statement.

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