The topless Santa advertisement from Dating-app removed for the objectifying male model

The advertisement of Lumen was ruled as the & # 39; objectify & # 39; of the male model in the ad

Dating app app with a topless Santa after a hipster makeover is forbidden to objectify the male model, 58, which shine in it

  • Lumen & # 39; s ad contained Paul Orchard, 58, who posed topless to promote the app
  • Advert saw him with braces and had a caption & # 39; draw a cracker from this Christmas & # 39;
  • Targeted ad must be removed because it can be seen as & # 39; objectifying & # 39; for the man

Charlie Bayliss for Mailonline

An advertisement with a photograph of a topless Santa is forbidden amid allegations that it has sexually objectified the 58-year-old model.

In the dating app ad, Paul Orchard showed that he is wearing a brace and holding a phone with the caption: & # 39; Take a cracker this Christmas. & # 39;

Exterion Media, Transport for London's advertising agency, said that the caption should be changed to something less suggestive & # 39; and that the model must be covered.

The advertisement of Lumen was ruled as the & # 39; objectify & # 39; of the male model in the ad

The advertisement of Lumen was ruled as the & # 39; objectify & # 39; of the male model in the ad

Exterion Media, Transport for London's advertising agency, said that the caption should be changed to something less suggestive & # 39; and that the model must be covered. Pictured: the new advertisement released by Lumen

Exterion Media, Transport for London's advertising agency, said that the caption should be changed to something less suggestive & # 39; and that the model must be covered. Pictured: the new advertisement released by Lumen

Exterion Media, Transport for London's advertising agency, said that the caption should be changed to something less suggestive & # 39; and that the model must be covered. Pictured: the new advertisement released by Lumen

Lumen, a dating app exclusively for people over 50, was charged with & # 39; non-compliance & # 39; of the guidelines of the Committee of Advertising Practice and "can be seen as objectifying for the man and his body."

Model Mr Orchard said: I am surprised that these ads have been banned, especially if you look at the other images that you regularly encounter in the subway of younger people who carry much less than I do.

We worked hard to ensure that the photos were both tasteful and fun and it's a shame that TfL does not see it that way. & # 39;

Tube bosses have clung to what they find inappropriate ads, but the founders of Lumen made the decision absurd & # 39; labeled.

A more & # 39; due & # 39; version of the advertisement can now be seen in Euston station, despite the fact that the topless version appears on other parts of Transport for London. Billboards with the original image and slogan appear from next week in the whole country.

Co-founder Charly Lester said: & # 39; This campaign is meant only as a bit of fun. I did not think it would be banished, I thought it was funny. I do not think it's rude – it's brutal.

& # 39; Our app is all about anti-ageism, physical self-confidence and being yourself, so it's a little depressing to ban this. It is ridiculous and absurd. & # 39;

The ad has already risen in parts of London, but a new version will soon be released

The ad has already risen in parts of London, but a new version will soon be released

The ad has already risen in parts of London, but a new version will soon be released

Exterion rejected the ad due to social responsibility and potentially offensive emails that were revealed by the Evening Standard.

Lumen had to use a different version with the model in a red three-piece suit with the slogan Santa, Baby & # 39 ;.

Mrs. Lester said that the & # 39; sensitivity & # 39; had arisen from the controversy of a Protein World ad in 2015, on which a toned woman wore a bikini with the question 'Are you beach body ready & # 39 ;.

TfL said that if an ad like & # 39; non-compliant & # 39; is considered, they work with advertisers to change it.

The Committee of Advertising Practice said that advertisements that reinforce gender stereotypes, such as men who struggle with household chores or women as bad drivers, are banned from next June.

.