The third part of the passengers of the airlines say that they would try to recover the bags in an emergency evacuation

A third of the passengers of a British airline would stop to try to recover their belongings during an emergency evacuation, revealed a new survey

More than a third of British airline passengers would try to recover their belongings during an emergency evacuation, even if they were in immediate danger, a survey reveals.

In addition, according to this research, conducted by ComRes for the Royal Aeronautical Society, (35%) would still try to collect their belongings, even if they were told not to do so.

The organization says the study, published today, reflects a common trend of passengers recovering their carry-on luggage during evacuations of emergency aircraft.

A third of the passengers of a British airline would stop to try to recover their belongings during an emergency evacuation, revealed a new survey

A third of the passengers of a British airline would stop to try to recover their belongings during an emergency evacuation, revealed a new survey

Investigators questioned more than 2,000 British adults and also found that in an evacuation scenario with an immediate threat to passengers, the majority (61%) of UK passengers would not take anything with them except the contents of their pockets. .

However, approaching a quarter (23 percent) said he would take valuables within reach and six percent would recover and take all his belongings with them. Six percent, meanwhile, would take all valuables, but not other belongings.

In an evacuation that did not involve an immediate threat to passengers, three-quarters (75 percent) of the passengers said they would recover some of their belongings.

Three out of ten (29 percent) said they would pick up all their belongings, including hand luggage.

A similar percentage (31 percent) said they would only take valuables at their fingertips.

While only one in five (20 percent) said they would not carry anything with them except the contents of their pockets.

Airlines operators instruct passengers to leave all their belongings in an emergency evacuation because the recovery of possessions puts passengers and crew at risk of injury or even death by delaying or obstructing evacuation, hitting other passengers with luggage or even drill evacuation slides

Airlines operators instruct passengers to leave all their belongings in an emergency evacuation because the recovery of possessions puts passengers and crew at risk of injury or even death by delaying or obstructing evacuation, hitting other passengers with luggage or even drill evacuation slides

Airlines operators instruct passengers to leave all their belongings in an emergency evacuation because the recovery of possessions puts passengers and crew at risk of injury or even death by delaying or obstructing evacuation, hitting other passengers with luggage or even drill evacuation slides

KEY RESULTS OF THE SURVEY

Evacuation that does not imply an immediate threat to passengers

• Three quarters (75%) of British adults who flew in the last five years would carry some belongings.

• About one third (31 percent) would only take valuables within reach.

• A similar proportion (29 percent) would take all their belongings with them.

• Only one in five (20 percent) says they would not take anything with them except the contents of their pockets.

Evacuation that implies an immediate threat to passengers

• A majority (61 percent) would not carry anything with them except for the contents of their pockets.

• Around one third (35 percent) say they would take their belongings with them.

• 23 percent would only take valuables close at hand.

• 6 percent would take all valuables, but not other belongings.

• Six percent say they will take all their belongings.

Three-quarters (77 percent) of the passengers would expect to carry some of their belongings with them in at least one of these emergency evacuation scenarios despite instructions from the flight crew not to do so.

Airlines operators instruct passengers to leave all their belongings in an emergency evacuation because the recovery of possessions puts passengers and crew at risk of injury or even death by delaying or obstructing evacuation, hitting other passengers with luggage or even drill evacuation slides.

The investigation follows a report published in June that found that an increasing amount of carry-on luggage is being carried to the cabins because many passengers are forced to pay more to register a suitcase.

The report cites an example of a passenger on a British Airways Boeing 777-200 en route from Beijing to Heathrow in 2008, who returned to the plane by an emergency slide to retrieve his belongings after he crashed on the final approach.

Earlier this year, a separate report from the US National Transportation Safety Board. UU He found that in four incidents in recent years, evacuations were hampered by travelers who took carry-on luggage.

After the report was made public, the head of the NTSB suggested that "the fines could make people worry less about their Gucci luggage."

Passengers evacuate after the engine of the British Airways plane burst into flames at the McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas in September 2015.

Passengers evacuate after the engine of the British Airways plane burst into flames at the McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas in September 2015.

Passengers evacuate a British Airways plane after it burst into flames at the McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas in September 2015.

In 2015, passengers were photographed moving away from a British Airways plane that was engulfed in flames at the McCarran airport in Las Vegas with bags and bags.

Terry Buckland, president of the operations group of the Royal Aeronautical Society Flight, said: "The fact that so many passengers decide to stop and pick up some or all of their belongings during an emergency evacuation is a troubling finding.

& # 39; The airline operator's safety instructions instruct passengers to leave all their belongings in case of an emergency evacuation for clear safety reasons. Passengers will not have a full appreciation of the nature and severity of an emergency and should not ignore or question the crew's commands.

"Aviation authorities and operators should consider whether current requirements, as well as industry practices, support faster and safer emergency evacuations.

Wherever there are deficiencies or possible improvements identified, the Aviation Authorities should take the necessary measures.

"Aviation authorities should consider the concept of lockable overhead storage compartments to see if this could help alleviate the problems raised in this survey."

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