The Texas company can publish three-dimensional printed weapons plans online

On Friday, a federal judge denied the efforts of the arms control groups to prevent 3-D printable gun designs from being posted online, a 3-D plastic gun shown in 2013.

A Texas company will be able to legally publish plans for 3-D printed weapons online starting Wednesday.

The plans for the plastic guns were created by Defense Distributed led by the founder Cody Wilson, and include designs for a plastic AR-15 semiautomatic assault rifle, a weapon used in many mass shootings in the United States, as well as other firearms.

The group first published plans for 3-D printable online weapons in 2013, but the government told them to shoot them down, prompting Wilson to sue in 2015 claiming that his First Amendment and Second Amendment rights had been violated.

On Friday, a federal judge denied the efforts of the arms control groups to prevent 3-D printable gun designs from being posted online, a 3-D plastic gun shown in 2013.

On Friday, a federal judge denied the efforts of the arms control groups to prevent 3-D printable gun designs from being posted online, a 3-D plastic gun shown in 2013.

In June, an agreement between Defense Distributed and the US government. UU It allowed the company to publish weapons drawings online, which led a coalition of arms control groups to file an appeal on Thursday to block the Trump administration's decision.

However, US District Judge Robert Pitman denied the request for an order Friday in Austin, Texas.

Although Judge Pitman said he sympathized with the concerns of the arms control group, he questioned his legal position in the case and added that he would explain the reasons for his decision in a written order.

The government until recently had argued that the plans represented a risk to national security.

Weapons control groups, including the Brady Center for the Prevention of Violence with Arms, Everytown for Gun Safety and the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence, said there has been no explanation for the administration's abrupt reversal of the theme.

The State Department will allow Wilson to start publishing his printable 3-D firearm plans on his website beginning Wednesday, August 1, according to CBS.

Editor: Defense Distributed, founded by Cody Wilson, is making designs available since August 1, but other sites have already published designs

Editor: Defense Distributed, founded by Cody Wilson, is making designs available since August 1, but other sites have already published designs

Friday's decision means that Defense Distributed will have legal permission to share their weapon drawings online starting Wednesday, August 1, founder Cody Wilson in the photo above.

  Plastic weapon: eight attorneys general of the democratic states say that the administration of Trump must suspend the capacity to download designs of pistols of 3D printer, that was conformed with the publication of the designs in June, which allowed that the designs were put available

  Plastic weapon: eight attorneys general of the democratic states say that the administration of Trump must suspend the capacity to download designs of pistols of 3D printer, that was conformed with the publication of the designs in June, which allowed that the designs were put available

After a legal battle, the company will be able to go ahead with its controversial plans as of Wednesday, August 1, the three-dimensional printed plastic weapon represented in use above.

In the court presentations, the arms control groups said that not stopping the distribution of the plan would cause immediate and irreparable damage to the national security of the United States. "

"The stated goal of Defense Distributed is to sound the death sentence for gun control," David Bramante, attorney for the Brady Center, told Pitman during the hearing.

Joshua Blackman, Defense Distributed attorney, said he was grateful for the judge's decision.

The founder of Defense Distributed Wilson, a self-proclaimed anarchist from Texas, said in an online video that the plans were downloaded more than 400,000 times before they were removed in 2013.

Lawrence Keane, general counsel of the National Shooting Sports Foundation, a trade association for gun makers, told Reuters that concerns about 3-D printable guns were exaggerated.

"I do not think criminals are likely to use this expensive and clumsy technology," Keane said. The NSSF is not involved in the case.

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