The test strain can discard Ben Stokes of the third test against India on the Trent Bridge

Cricket player Ben Stokes leaves Bristol Crown Court with his wife Clare Ratcliffe on Friday

The ability of Ben Stokes to play in the third round against India is a serious doubt, regardless of whether or not a skirmish is allowed in the next few days.

Durham's SUV, and the star of the first test in Edgbaston, looked exhausted on Friday having endured five days in court.

Despite appearing relaxed each morning when he enters the Bristol Crown Court with his wife Clare, Stokes has spent more than 25 hours inside court one, including five tireless hours on the witness stand.

Cricket player Ben Stokes leaves Bristol Crown Court with his wife Clare Ratcliffe on Friday

Cricket player Ben Stokes leaves Bristol Crown Court with his wife Clare Ratcliffe on Friday

When he returned to the defendants' bench after he had finished giving his statement, he seemed exhausted as he reclined in his seat, puffed up his cheeks and held his face in his hands. Earlier in the week they had seen him yawn, suggesting that the trial had already taken its toll.

Stokes, 27, is accused of beating two unconscious men in the alleged fight in Bristol last September. He denies the charge of fray.

The future of Stokes in the England team will depend not only on the verdict in his trial, but also on the judgment of the independent Cricket Disciplinary Committee that is conducting a formal disciplinary procedure against Stokes and Alex Hales, who was present at the night but does not face criminal charges, and is expected to have a hearing after the legal proceedings surrounding Stokes are complete.

The ECB is ready to clarify its position regarding the future of Stokes once a verdict is issued.

He spent five days and more than 25 hours in court, including five on the stand.

He spent five days and more than 25 hours in court, including five on the stand.

He spent five days and more than 25 hours in court, including five on the stand.

Even if he is not found guilty, it seems possible that he will not be considered physically and mentally fit to play at Trent Bridge on Saturday.

It is unlikely that the jury will be fired to start deciding the verdict on Monday, leaving open the possibility that the trial will not end until Wednesday or Thursday.

Although that would give him time to join the squad, it is not clear if he would be considered wise.

Stokes seems to have shown signs of physical discomfort throughout his time in court. At various times during his evidence, the judge granted him permission to sit down due to a backache from standing for long periods, and during the breaks in the interrogation he occasionally grimaced and tried to stretch.

Even if he is not convicted, Stokes can not be considered fit to join the England squad again.

Even if he is not convicted, Stokes can not be considered fit to join the England squad again.

Even if he is not convicted, Stokes can not be considered fit to join the England squad again.

In addition to any physical effects you may feel from being in court for more than five hours a day, anyone who experiences it must feel some degree of tension or mental pressure.

During the two-hour interrogation on Friday, he faced an almost constant interrogation, which probably felt more intense and uninterrupted than any quick bowling spell he had faced in the fold.

While being questioned by Anna Midgley, attorney for co-defendant Ryan Ali, he had to fend off the proverbial gorilla behind the gorilla.

He was repeatedly accused of being "wrong" when he claimed to have heard "homophobic abuse" against a couple, and was pressured on why he could not remember a "single word" that was used.

The SUV of Durham played a stellar role in the first victory of the race of 31 races in Edgbaston

The SUV of Durham played a stellar role in the first victory of the race of 31 races in Edgbaston

The SUV of Durham played a stellar role in the first victory of the race of 31 races in Edgbaston

Stokes told the jury on several occasions that he was "very clear that the words used were homophobic abuse."

Then he was accused of having exaggerated the exchange too much … in an attempt to justify his own violent behavior, is not it? & # 39; He told the jury: & # 39; No & # 39;

When told that he had "misrepresented to the jury, is not it?" Stokes replied "no" again.

Later, when questioned by prosecutor Nicholas Corsellis, Stokes was twice charged with "lying to the jury." He told the jury on both occasions: & # 39; I'm not lying & # 39;

On the subject of how much he had to drink, Stokes admitted that he could have drunk more than 10 drinks.

He denied the claims that he was "really very drunk," and in a written statement, his teammate, Jake Ball, said he did not think Stokes was "drunk." The trial continues on Monday.

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