The terror graphic that destroys the myth of the & # 39; evasion & # 39; and it shows the life of millennials is more difficult than before

The graph reveals that young people have experienced a small increase in income since 2009 (in the photo)

The terror graphic that destroys the myth of the "broken amines" and shows how the life of millennials is harder than ever

  • The chart destroys the myth of evasion as the growth of millennial income is lower than ever
  • Since 2009, Australians between 25 and 34 years of age have experienced a decline
  • The older Australians, by comparison, experienced steady growth in recent years
  • The graph comes amid a constant debate about how millennials spend their cash

Zoe Zaczek for Daily Mail Australia

An economist has burst the myth of the & # 39; squashed evasion & # 39; & # 39; with a graph that reveals that the growth of millennial income is lower than ever, despite the increase in living costs.

Jason Murphy said that since 2009 those between 15 and 24 years old have experienced only an increase in income, while Australians between 25 and 34 years experienced a decline.

In comparison, middle-aged and elderly Australians enjoyed steady income growth during the same period.

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The graph reveals that young people have experienced a small increase in income since 2009 (in the photo)

The graph reveals that young people have experienced a small increase in income since 2009 (in the photo)

The graph also compares income amounts since 1988 with income growth between 2003 and 2010, the highest for all groups.

The graph refutes the widespread belief that millennials do not prioritize savings, but instead spend money on luxury brunch options, such as avocado toast on toast.

Bernard Salt controversially put the debate on avocado in the spotlight in a column of the Weekend Australian in 2016 and his argument has continued to revolve for two years.

Salt claimed that he would often see young people spend $ 22 on a broken avocado with shredded feta cheese.

The graphic exploits the myth of the crushed avocado that millennials are spending money brunch instead of saving for property

The graphic exploits the myth of the crushed avocado that millennials are spending money brunch instead of saving for property

The graphic exploits the myth of the crushed avocado that millennials are spending money brunch instead of saving for property

"Should not you economize eating at home? How often are you eating out?" The columnist wrote.

Twenty-two dollars several times per week could go to a deposit in a house.

Young Australians are also burdened by the high costs of living, especially in the main cities of Sydney and Melbourne.

Housing prices in Sydney have been unattainable for young people who wish to enter the property with the average house price in coastal cities that peaked at $ 1.17 million in June 2017.

It is expected that housing prices in Sydney and Melbourne will decline after all historical highs since 2015.

From 2009-10, young people between 15 and 24 years experienced a small increase in income, while those between 25 and 34 years experienced a decrease (stock image)

From 2009-10, young people between 15 and 24 years experienced a small increase in income, while those between 25 and 34 years experienced a decrease (stock image)

From 2009-10, young people between 15 and 24 years experienced a small increase in income, while those between 25 and 34 years experienced a decrease (stock image)

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