WhatsNew2Day
Latest News And Breaking Headlines

The Terracotta Army is expanding as 220 earthenware ‘warriors’ are discovered

The ranks of the ‘Terracotta Army’ guarding the mausoleum of the First Emperor of China have grown when archaeologists reported Monday that they found 220 new warriors.

The tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang is buried in the heart of a 76-meter high hill in today’s Lintong district of Xi’an, in northwest China.

The necropolis around the unopened grave houses more than 8,200 of the pottery sculptures, which were first discovered in 1974 by local farmers.

The grave has four main pits, each one to the east of the tomb of Emperor Qin, as if he wanted to protect him from the east states he had conquered in life.

The last, third, pit one excavation – which has been going on for ten years – has exposed around 4300 square feet (400 m²), the Beijing Youth reported.

The latest series of Terracotta Soldiers comes from five different grades, including a previously unknown who is called “lower than the lowest,” Shaanxi TV reported.

Among the other recent finds from the necropolis is a golden camel statue that is believed to be the oldest of its kind known in China.

Scroll down for video

The ranks of the 'Terracotta Army' that guard the mausoleum of the First Emperor of China have grown when archaeologists reported Monday that they found 220 new warriors

The ranks of the ‘Terracotta Army’ that guard the mausoleum of the First Emperor of China have grown when archaeologists reported Monday that they found 220 new warriors

The necropolis around the unopened grave houses more than 8,200 of the pottery sculptures, which were first discovered in 1974 by local farmers

The necropolis around the unopened grave houses more than 8,200 of the pottery sculptures, which were first discovered in 1974 by local farmers

The necropolis around the unopened grave houses more than 8,200 of the pottery sculptures, which were first discovered in 1974 by local farmers

“The terracotta warriors in the mausoleum are set up in the same way as real soldiers thousands of years ago in the Qin Dynasty (221–206 BC),” said Liu Zheng, member of the China Cultural Relics Academy, Global Times.

“Archaeologists can investigate real military systems of the dynasty with these excavated warriors,” he added.

Senior military officers in the Qin Dynasty, for example, stood in front of their formations with their swords in their hands, Mr. Liu explained.

In addition, he added, the senior officers wore hair accessories other than those of their subordinates.

In addition to the new soldiers, archaeologists have also excavated weapons and twelve horses during this last series of excavations in the grave.

The new terracotta soldiers also have well-preserved original colors.

“When these earthenware statues were first dug up, they were mostly colored – with red belts and dark armor – but we lacked conservation skills and the colors faded,” Liu said.

“But this time, improved technologies ensure that the newly found statues retain their vibrant colors.”

“The exhibition, excavation and conservation of the mausoleum are proceeding simultaneously.”

Among the other recent finds from the necropolis are a golden camel statue, pictured, which is believed to be the oldest of its kind known in China

Among the other recent finds from the necropolis are a golden camel statue, pictured, which is believed to be the oldest of its kind known in China

Among the other recent finds from the necropolis are a golden camel statue, pictured, which is believed to be the oldest of its kind known in China

Senior military officers in the Qin Dynasty stood in front of their formations with their swords in their hands, Mr. Liu explained. In the photo, experts are working on a soldier in pit one

Senior military officers in the Qin Dynasty stood in front of their formations with their swords in their hands, Mr. Liu explained. In the photo, experts are working on a soldier in pit one

Senior military officers in the Qin Dynasty stood in front of their formations with their swords in their hands, Mr. Liu explained. In the photo, experts are working on a soldier in pit one

The latest series of Terracotta Soldiers comes from five different rows, including a previously unknown who is called “lower than the lowest,” Shaanxi TV reported

The grave has four main pits, each one to the east of the tomb of Emperor Qin, as if he wanted to protect him from the east states he had conquered in life.

The grave has four main pits, each one to the east of the tomb of Emperor Qin, as if he wanted to protect him from the east states he had conquered in life.

The grave has four main pits, each one to the east of the tomb of Emperor Qin, as if he wanted to protect him from the east states he had conquered in life.

The Terracotta Army is only part of the wider necropolis complex around the emperor’s tomb, which, according to archaeological studies, covers some 98 square kilometers.

The necropolis is thought to represent a scaled-down version of the imperial palace of Qin – complete with offices, halls, stables and even a park.

However, the central grave was never dug up, largely for fear that the tools needed to do this safely and without damaging the grave may not yet exist.

The last, third, pit one excavation - which has been going on for ten years - has uncovered around 4300 square feet (400 m²), the Beijing Youth reported

The last, third, pit one excavation - which has been going on for ten years - has uncovered around 4300 square feet (400 m²), the Beijing Youth reported

The last, third, pit one excavation – which has been going on for ten years – has uncovered around 4300 square feet (400 m²), the Beijing Youth reported

“Exhibition, excavation and conservation of the mausoleum are going on simultaneously,” said Liu Zheng, member of the China Cultural Relics Academy

“When these earthenware statues were first dug up, they were mostly colored – with red belts and dark armor – but we lacked conservation skills and the colors faded,” Liu said. “Thanks to improved technologies, the newly found images can retain their vibrant colors”

The Terracotta Army is only part of the wider necropolis complex around the emperor's tomb, which, according to archaeological studies, covers some 98 square kilometers. Depicted, a head of a Terracotta Warrior

The Terracotta Army is only part of the wider necropolis complex around the emperor's tomb, which, according to archaeological studies, covers some 98 square kilometers. Depicted, a head of a Terracotta Warrior

The Terracotta Army is only part of the wider necropolis complex around the emperor’s tomb, which, according to archaeological studies, covers some 98 square kilometers. Depicted, a head of a Terracotta Warrior

The necropolis is thought to represent a scaled-down version of the imperial palace of Qin - complete with offices, halls, stables and even a park. Depicted, a treasure from the necropolis

The necropolis is thought to represent a scaled-down version of the imperial palace of Qin - complete with offices, halls, stables and even a park. Depicted, a treasure from the necropolis

The necropolis is thought to represent a scaled-down version of the imperial palace of Qin – complete with offices, halls, stables and even a park. Depicted, a treasure from the necropolis

However, the central grave was never dug up, largely for fear that the tools needed to do this safely and without damaging the grave may not yet exist. Pictured, a find from the excavation

However, the central grave was never dug up, largely for fear that the tools needed to do this safely and without damaging the grave may not yet exist. Pictured, a find from the excavation

However, the central grave was never dug up, largely for fear that the tools needed to do this safely and without damaging the grave may not yet exist. Pictured, a find from the excavation

The tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang is buried in the heart of a 76-meter high hill in today's Xi'an Lintong District, in northwest China.

The tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang is buried in the heart of a 76-meter high hill in today's Xi'an Lintong District, in northwest China.

The tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang is buried in the heart of a 76-meter high hill in today’s Xi’an Lintong District, in northwest China.

What are Chinese terracotta fighters? The 8,000-man burial army built by the first emperor

Each of these 2000-year-old figures was given an individual personality and was colored

Each of these 2000-year-old figures was given an individual personality and was colored

Each of these 2000-year-old figures was given an individual personality and was colored

The Terracotta Army is a form of funeral art buried with the first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, in 210 to 209 BC and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his hereafter.

Undoubtedly the most famous archaeological site in the world, it was discovered by chance by villagers in 1974 and since that date there have been excavations on the site.

An extraordinary achievement of mass production, each figure was given an individual personality, although they were not intended as portraits.

The figures vary in height depending on their role, with the generals at the highest.

The current estimates are that there were more than 8,000 soldiers, 130 chariots with 520 horses and 150 cavalry horses, the majority of which are still buried.

Since 1998, figures of terracotta acrobats, bureaucrats, musicians and bronze birds have been discovered on the spot.

They are designed to entertain the emperor in his hereafter and they are crucial to our understanding of his attempts to control the world, even in death.

In addition to the new soldiers, archaeologists have also excavated weapons and twelve horses during this last series of excavations in the grave. Pictured, a previously found crossbow

In addition to the new soldiers, archaeologists have also excavated weapons and twelve horses during this last series of excavations in the grave. Pictured, a previously found crossbow

In addition to the new soldiers, archaeologists have also excavated weapons and twelve horses during this last series of excavations in the grave. Pictured, a previously found crossbow

.