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A re-enactment by an Anglo-Saxon society for living history is depicted above in a stock image. Miss Rambaran-Olm said that people in early England - or & # 39; Englelond & # 39; - did not call themselves Anglo-Saxons (file photo)

The term & # 39; Anglo-Saxon & # 39; must be removed from modern language because it has links with white supremacists, says scholar and medieval English specialist Mary Rambaran-Olm

  • Academic says that & # 39; Anglo-Saxon & # 39; is used by white supremacists and calls for a ban
  • Mary Rambaran-Olm said that people in early England did not use a term themselves
  • She says that previous objections to the term Dark Ages sets a precedent
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The term Anglo-Saxon is & # 39; associated with white supremacy & # 39; and must be thrown away, academics have argued. It should be replaced by & # 39; asked English & # 39; instead, they said.

Anglo-Saxon traditionally refers to groups from Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands who settled in Britain at the end of Roman rule.

The early medieval English specialist Mary Rambaran-Olm, an independent scholar and author, however, claimed that the term is used by white supremacists to refer to white British people and should be banned.

A re-enactment by an Anglo-Saxon society for living history is depicted above in a stock image. Miss Rambaran-Olm said that people in early England - or & # 39; Englelond & # 39; - did not call themselves Anglo-Saxons (file photo)

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A re-enactment by an Anglo-Saxon society for living history is depicted above in a stock image. Miss Rambaran-Olm said that people in early England – or & # 39; Englelond & # 39; – did not call themselves Anglo-Saxons (file photo)

The university graduate – who grew up in Canada and is now based in Ireland – says that he would precede previous objections to the term Dark Ages.

She said The times: & # 39; In general, white supremacists use the term to make some sort of connection to their heritage (which is inaccurate) or to make associations with & # 39; whiteness & # 39; but they also usually abuse it to connect themselves to a warrior past. & # 39;

Miss Rambaran-Olm said that people in early England – or & # 39; Englelond & # 39; – did not call themselves Anglo-Saxons, but tended to refer to themselves as & # 39; Englisc & # 39; or & # 39; Anglecynn & # 39 ;.

The academician said the term became more popular in the 18th and 19th centuries and was used to connect white people with their & # 39; supposed origins & # 39 ;.

Hitler wrote about the & # 39; Anglo-Saxon determination & # 39; to hold India, while imperialist Cecil Rhodes also regularly used the term.

John Overholt, curator of early books and manuscripts at Harvard's Houghton Library, supported a ban on the term.

Re-enactment artists are pictured above next to Clifford & # 39; s Tower in York. The term Anglo-Saxon is & # 39; associated with white supremacy & # 39; and must be thrown away, academics have argued. It should be replaced instead with & # 39; asked English & # 39 ;, they said (file photo)
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Re-enactment artists are pictured above next to Clifford & # 39; s Tower in York. The term Anglo-Saxon is & # 39; associated with white supremacy & # 39; and must be thrown away, academics have argued. It should be replaced instead with & # 39; asked English & # 39 ;, they said (file photo)

Re-enactment artists are pictured above next to Clifford & # 39; s Tower in York. The term Anglo-Saxon is & # 39; associated with white supremacy & # 39; and must be thrown away, academics have argued. It should be replaced instead with & # 39; asked English & # 39 ;, they said (file photo)

& # 39; The term Anglo-Saxon is inextricably linked to pseudohistoric stories about white supremacy and offers help and comfort to contemporary white supremacists, & # 39; he wrote on Twitter. & # 39; Medieval history scholars must leave. & # 39;

Earlier this year, the International Society of Anglo Saxonists conducted a survey among its 600 members and 60 percent of the group agreed to refer to & # 39; Anglo-Saxon & # 39; remove it from the name.

But Tom Holland, author of books including Athelstan: The Making of England, said the term & # 39; was inextricably linked to Alfred's claim to rule as a shared Anglian-Saxon identity & # 39 ;.

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& # 39; Scholars must be free to use it, & # 39; he said.

In a tweet he wrote about the idea of ​​abolishing the term Anglo-Saxon: & # 39; Crazy like a bag of ferrets, as they say in Deira (a former kingdom). & # 39;

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