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Several carnivorous Great Sundew, known for its ruby ​​tentacles dripping with thick slime, have already been planted at Risley Moss, Warrington

The tentacled and slimy carnivorous sundew plant of England is reintroduced into the British countryside after disappearing 150 years ago

  • Some carnivorous Great Sundew are planted at Risley Moss, Warrington
  • By making the marshes wet again, rare species can thrive after decades
  • The mucus-dripping tentacles of the Great Sundew are used to kill crop-eating insects
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After more than 150 years, a sort of insect splint plant is being reintroduced into swamp areas in north-west England.

Several carnivorous Great Sundew, known for its ruby ​​tentacles dripping with thick slime, have already been planted at Risley Moss, Warrington.

Due to the lack of moist soil on which these rare species depend, the plants are lost and have difficulty growing for decades.

But conservationists have now jumped on the saturated terrain again and have begun to cultivate them again.

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It disappeared around the beginning of the industrial revolution when mosses were drained for agriculture and housing.

Several carnivorous Great Sundew, known for its ruby ​​tentacles dripping with thick slime, have already been planted at Risley Moss, Warrington

Several carnivorous Great Sundew, known for its ruby ​​tentacles dripping with thick slime, have already been planted at Risley Moss, Warrington

WHAT IS THE CARNIVELY BIG SUNSET?

Several carnivorous Great Sundew, known for its ruby ​​tentacles dripping with thick slime, have already been planted at Risley Moss, Warrington.

Due to the lack of moist soil on which these rare species depend, the plants are lost and have difficulty growing for decades.

Like all sundew, it uses stalked tentacles to attract, catch and digest small arthropods, usually insects.

Josh Styles, founder of the North West Rare Plant Initiative, has taken cuttings from regions with a high plant population before he buried the seeds in fields in the northwest.

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He said: & # 39; Most of these plants are rare in the northwest, some have been extinct for 150 years. & # 39;

The £ 265,000 Manchester Mosslands Species Reintroduction project – which also included Astley Moss – saw him collaborating with local nature groups and councils.

Large sundew – Drosera anglica – is often used by farmers to kill crop-eating insects that it smacks into sticky mucus before they are digested.

Elongated sundew, marsh asphodel, white beak sedge and bladderwort are also all being re-introduced.

Each of these carnivorous plants disappeared from the area when the mosses were stripped of peat to create the foundations for houses.

Josh Styles, founder of the North West Rare Plant Initiative, has taken cuttings from regions with high plant populations before the seeds were buried in fields in the northwest
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Josh Styles, founder of the North West Rare Plant Initiative, has taken cuttings from regions with high plant populations before the seeds were buried in fields in the northwest

Josh Styles, founder of the North West Rare Plant Initiative, has taken cuttings from regions with high plant populations before the seeds were buried in fields in the northwest

Mike Longden, Mosslands Officer of the Lancashire Wildlife Trust, said: & # 39; The re-wetting of the mossland areas creates ideal homes for these plants, where more than 95 percent of the peat has been extracted for fuel and fertilizer or lost for agriculture and construction.

& # 39; Although plant species such as sundew, sfagnum moss and cottongrass have returned without much encouragement, they still need our help.

& # 39; And other plants must be reintroduced after years after, their rightful home. & # 39;

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But previous attempts to introduce carnivorous plants into foreign land were disastrous.

When the North American pitcher plant was cultivated in Great Britain, it quickly conquered the existing plant population, killing many of the species.

The £ 265,000 Manchester Mosslands Species Reintroduction project - which also included Astley Moss - saw him collaborating with local nature groups and councils

The £ 265,000 Manchester Mosslands Species Reintroduction project - which also included Astley Moss - saw him collaborating with local nature groups and councils

The £ 265,000 Manchester Mosslands Species Reintroduction project – which also included Astley Moss – saw him collaborating with local nature groups and councils

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