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Maddie Nelson, 18, from Nephi, Utah, said she started steaming three years ago and did so almost every day like most children at her school. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

A teenager from Utah says that her years of herding have landed her in the hospital in a medically induced coma.

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Maddie Nelson, 18, from Nephi, has been vaporizing every day for three years without any problems – just like most children in her school, she says.

But earlier this year, Nelson began to experience weeks of nausea and vomiting, VOC 13 reported.

Finally, after complaining about intense back pain and fever, she was rushed to the hospital, where her symptoms rapidly worsened.

She was transferred to another hospital where doctors discovered she had contracted a rare lung disease and placed her on a respirator after she could no longer breathe independently.

Nelson is one of the nearly 200 people in the entire country who have had serious, mysterious lung diseases that are believed to be associated with vapors.

Maddie Nelson, 18, from Nephi, Utah, said she started steaming three years ago and did so almost every day like most children at her school. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

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Maddie Nelson, 18, from Nephi, Utah, said she started steaming three years ago and did so almost every day like most children at her school. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

In the spring of 2019, Nelson experienced (photo) stomach pain, nausea and vomiting for weeks.

In the spring of 2019, Nelson experienced (photo) stomach pain, nausea and vomiting for weeks.

In July, her family took her to the hospital after she had a high fever and had trouble breathing. Pictured: Nelson with her boyfriend,

In July, her family took her to the hospital after she had a high fever and had trouble breathing. Pictured: Nelson with her boyfriend,

In the spring of 2019, Nelson suffered from abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting for weeks. In July, her family took her to the hospital after she had a high fever and had trouble breathing. Pictured: Nelson on the left and her friend on the right

Nelson told FOX 13 that when she first started steaming three years ago, she used zero nicotine evaporator juice.

However, it gradually grew into juice with 3 milligrams of nicotine.

& # 39; I have used all kinds of different products from all kinds of sheep shops in Utah County, & # 39; she said. & # 39; I used Naked Juice, all kinds of brand juices. & # 39;

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Suddenly Nelson started to lose her appetite in the spring of this year. Soon she regained everything she ate.

On July 27, after experiencing intense back pain and a high fever, her family brought her to Mountain View Hospital in Payson, Utah.

& # 39; My temperature was so high, my brain was completely turned off, & # 39; she said to FOX 13. & # 39; I thought I was at Payson Hospital one night and I was actually there for four days. & # 39;

According to a GoFundMe page, Nelson had trouble breathing and giving her additional oxygen didn't help.

She was transferred to the IC at the Timpanogos Regional Hospital in Orem – 23 km away – where she was placed in a medically induced coma for three days.

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Nelson was diagnosed with acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a rare disease caused by an accumulation of a type of white blood cell in the lungs in response to inflammation.

Symptoms include shortness of breath, cough, fatigue, fever, and inexplicable weight loss.

She was transferred to another hospital where she was intubated and placed in a medically induced coma. Pictured: Nelson in the hospital with her boyfriend

She was transferred to another hospital where she was intubated and placed in a medically induced coma. Pictured: Nelson in the hospital with her boyfriend

She was transferred to another hospital where she was intubated and placed in a medically induced coma. Pictured: Nelson in the hospital with her boyfriend

Doctors diagnosed Nelson with acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a rare disease caused by an accumulation of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the lungs. Pictured: Nelson in the hospital with her boyfriend

Doctors diagnosed Nelson with acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a rare disease caused by an accumulation of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the lungs. Pictured: Nelson in the hospital with her boyfriend

She says her doctors believe the condition was caused by vapors. Pictured: Nelson
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She says her doctors believe the condition was caused by vapors. Pictured: Nelson

Doctors diagnosed Nelson with acute eosinophilic pneumonia, a rare disease caused by an accumulation of eosinophils, a type of white blood cell, in the lungs. She says her doctors believe the condition was caused by vapors

The exact cause is unknown, but scientists suspect that a recent change in smoking habits or medication may be triggers.

Smoking and vaping are not identical, but lately there has been an increase in lung cases related to vaping.

According to the National Organization for Rare Disorders, fewer than 200 cases have been documented in the medical literature.

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Nelson said doctors explained the condition to her as follows: je If you breathe in the fluid (from e-liquids), you simply create the perfect environment for bacteria to grow in your lungs and to start an infection . And that is actually what happened. & # 39;

They suspect it was caused by her sheep and told her that her x-ray was one of the worst they had ever seen, and they are planning to use it as a learning tool.

Nelson said she has stopped vapen and wants to encourage others to do the same. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

Nelson said she has stopped vapen and wants to encourage others to do the same. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

Nelson said she has stopped vapen and wants to encourage others to do the same. Pictured: Nelson at the hospital

Nelson received steroids to help her fight the inflammation.

However, she says she is still not fully recovered. She uses oxygen at night and still occasionally feels a tightness on her chest.

On August 4, she shared photos of her in the hospital and encouraged others to stop vaping.

& # 39; I share my story so that you all know that there is something crazy in these pens that is not safe and has almost cost me my life & # 39 ;, she wrote.

& # 39; I always told myself it won't happen to me, but it can and will happen to you too … take my advice, don't smoke, don't vaporize. #vape #stopthevape. & # 39;

Nelson's diagnosis comes after news that federal health officials have identified nearly 200 cases of vape respiratory diseases in the US.

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The Utah Department of Health said it was investigating 21 cases this week, more than double the 10 reported last week.

No vapor product or composition is linked to all cases and officials said it is not clear whether there is a common cause.

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