The supports of the east coast of the USA. UU For & # 039; direct impact & # 039; Hurricane Florence

<pre><pre>The supports of the east coast of the USA. UU For & # 039; direct impact & # 039; Hurricane Florence

Hurricane Florence threatens "days and days" of life-threatening rain and flooding on the southeastern coast of the United States.

Florence, which has winds of 220km / h, is growing even stronger before it makes landfall on Thursday, mainly in southeastern North Carolina, near the South Carolina border, the National Hurricane Center in Miami said.

US President Donald Trump signed emergency declarations for North Carolina and South Carolina on Tuesday, releasing federal money and resources for response to the storm. Officials have declared states of emergency in North and South Carolina, Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia.

September 11, 2005: homes surrounded by floods after Hurricane Katrina. Experts fear Hurricane Florence will have the same impact.

AAP

More than 1.5 million people have received orders to evacuate their homes along the Atlantic coast of the United States.

At least 250,000 more people were due to be evacuated from the North Outer Banks in North Carolina on Tuesday after more than 50,000 people were ordered to leave Hatteras and Ocracoke, the southernmost barrier island in the state.

The governors of North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and Maryland have declared states of emergency.

Authorities warn of life-threatening coastal storms and the possibility that Florence will trigger prolonged torrential rains and widespread flooding, especially if it stays indoors for several days.

Aware of the devastation caused by a series of lethal hurricanes in the United States last year, residents of the Carolinas began the rituals of preparing for disasters: covering windows and buying groceries, water and gasoline.

Classified as category 4, Florence was the most severe storm that threatened the continental United States. UU This year and the first of its magnitude in addressing the Carolinas since 1989, when Hurricane Hugo swept Charleston, South Carolina.