The strike leader of climate change is the daughter of the speechwriter of Anthony Albanese

One of the teenage organizers of the climate attacks in Australia is the daughter of the speechwriter by Anthony Albanese.

Advertisements

Daisy Jeffrey, 17, leads the Sydney Strike for Climate indictment in which 300,000 people gathered to protest across the country on Friday.

Her father is James Jeffrey, a former columnist with the Australian newspaper who left in June to join the staff of the Labor opposition leader.

Daisy Jeffrey, 17, leads the Sydney Strike for Climate indictment in which 300,000 people gathered to protest across the country on Friday

Daisy Jeffrey, 17, leads the Sydney Strike for Climate indictment in which 300,000 people gathered to protest across the country on Friday

Daisy saw more than 100,000 people approaching in Sydney on Friday for the protests

Daisy saw more than 100,000 people approaching in Sydney on Friday for the protests

Daisy saw more than 100,000 people approaching in Sydney on Friday for the protests

Advertisements

Mr Jeffrey posted several positive tweets about climate change protests, but never mentioned his daughter activism.

Daisy has been an activist since long before her father started a political posting, campaigning about abortion and refugees in addition to climate change.

She even led a protest outside Mr Albanese's office in May and demanded that Labor make her demands part of the promises of her election campaign.

& # 39; I've been asked a few times & # 39; why were you outside a job center, aren't they meant to be the good ones? & # 39; 10 daily at the time.

& # 39; But Labor did not meet one of our three requirements, so we were protesting there today in an effort to get Labor to take action so that we know who we have in parliament.

& # 39; The Albo office is notoriously good at dealing with sit-ins … so we thought we would make as much noise as possible and it was epic. & # 39;

Her father is James Jeffrey, a former Australian newspaper columnist who left in June to join the Labor opposition staff.

Her father is James Jeffrey, a former Australian newspaper columnist who left in June to join the Labor opposition staff.

Advertisements

Her father is James Jeffrey, a former Australian newspaper columnist who left in June to join the Labor opposition staff.

Daisy even led a protest outside Mr Albanese's office in May and demanded that Labor make her demands part of the promises of her election campaign

Daisy even led a protest outside Mr Albanese's office in May and demanded that Labor make her demands part of the promises of her election campaign

Daisy even led a protest outside Mr Albanese's office in May and demanded that Labor make her demands part of the promises of her election campaign

& # 39; The Albo office is notoriously good at dealing with sit-ins ... so we thought we would make as much noise as possible and it was epic, & # 39; she said at the time

& # 39; The Albo office is notoriously good at dealing with sit-ins ... so we thought we would make as much noise as possible and it was epic, & # 39; she said at the time

& # 39; The Albo office is notoriously good at dealing with sit-ins … so we thought we would make as much noise as possible and it was epic, & # 39; she said at the time

Advertisements

On Monday evening, Daisy asked Paul Fletcher, Communications Minister, about Q&A: & # 39; Why would young Australians stay in school while our government is doing nothing to preserve our future? & # 39;

The high school student, who said Friday's protests & # 39; the best day of my life & # 39; , this point often makes, together with her fellow strikers, the school strike.

& # 39; It is nice to study exams if it makes no sense, because the government really made your future good & # 39 ;, she tweeted earlier this month.

In another post: & # 39; I should not be stressed now about the #climatecrisis. I should emphasize tomorrow about my math exam. This is not right. & # 39;

& # 39; The climate crisis scares me. I just want a safe future. Please listen to science. & # 39;

Daisy said Friday's protests & # 39; the best day of my life & # 39; and that they would postpone a series of Instagram posts until the group's three requirements were met
Advertisements

Daisy said Friday's protests & # 39; the best day of my life & # 39; and that they would postpone a series of Instagram posts until the group's three requirements were met

Daisy said Friday's protests & # 39; the best day of my life & # 39; and that they would postpone a series of Instagram posts until the group's three requirements were met

Daisy was interviewed by Ten News during the protest, but the political posting of her father was not mentioned

Daisy was interviewed by Ten News during the protest, but the political posting of her father was not mentioned

Daisy was interviewed by Ten News during the protest, but the political posting of her father was not mentioned

Daisy in a series of Instagram posts after the protests promised they would continue until the group's three requirements were met.

Advertisements

& # 39; Today more than 300,000 Australians took to the streets to demand climate action. I am so proud to see how this movement has grown, & she wrote.

& # 39; We will not stop before our government deals with climate change for what it is, a crisis. & # 39;

& # 39; I am tired of this fight, but I will not stop until we win. I'm tired of people telling me I'm just a kid, that I can't do anything because of that. Is. Bulls ** t. Just look at what we achieved yesterday. This movement is growing. & # 39;

Daisy's rhetoric is similar to Harriet O & Shea-Carre, the organizer of Melbourne, who started the strikes with her classmates a year ago.

The Victorian schoolgirl has been compared to fellow teen campaigner Greta Thunberg, 16, who expressed her concerns against Donald Trump on Monday.

& # 39; We will sacrifice everything we need, even our future, until the government takes real action on climate change, & # 39; Harriet said to Daily Mail Australia on Tuesday.

Harriet O & Shea-Carre is the face of School Strike for Climate, which organized protests in which 300,000 people rally through the country on Friday

Harriet O & Shea-Carre is the face of School Strike for Climate, which organized protests in which 300,000 people rally through the country on Friday

Harriet O & Shea-Carre is the face of School Strike for Climate, which organized protests in which 300,000 people rally through the country on Friday

Millions of people from all over the world no longer have a job or school as part of & # 39; Strike 4 Climate Action & # 39; held on Friday

Millions of people from all over the world no longer have a job or school as part of & # 39; Strike 4 Climate Action & # 39; held on Friday

Millions of people from all over the world no longer have a job or school as part of & # 39; Strike 4 Climate Action & # 39; held on Friday

Advertisements

& # 39; The younger you are, the more you will be affected, so we must be part of the decisions with politicians who will not see the worst.

& # 39; I should be in school and I wish I were, but people's lives are more important. When politicians stand up, we go back to class. & # 39;

Harriet, an annual student in Castlemaine, about 120 km northwest of Melbourne, said her drastic action was the only way to get the government to listen.

Kinderen Children cannot vote, so this is the only way to change something. It will be too late and people are literally dying, & she said.

Harriet & # 39; s protest started almost a year ago when she and friends Milou Albrecht and Callum Neilson-Bridgefoot protested with their classmates.

Harriet, an annual student in Castlemaine, about 120 km northwest of Melbourne, said her drastic action, along with that of her friend and co-organizer Milou Albrecht (left), was the only way to get the government to listen
Advertisements

Harriet, an annual student in Castlemaine, about 120 km northwest of Melbourne, said her drastic action, along with that of her friend and co-organizer Milou Albrecht (left), was the only way to get the government to listen

Harriet, an annual student in Castlemaine, about 120 km northwest of Melbourne, said her drastic action, along with that of her friend and co-organizer Milou Albrecht (left), was the only way to get the government to listen

Harriet & # 39; s protest started almost a year ago when she and classmates were on the bus to school and Milou (left) showed an article that she read about Greta performing a solo climate strike in her native Sweden

Harriet & # 39; s protest started almost a year ago when she and classmates were on the bus to school and Milou (left) showed an article that she read about Greta performing a solo climate strike in her native Sweden

Harriet & # 39; s protest started almost a year ago when she and classmates were on the bus to school and Milou (left) showed an article that she read about Greta performing a solo climate strike in her native Sweden

Within a month, protests of 10,000 people led by children who walked out of school across the country arose, but were slammed by Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

Advertisements

& # 39; We do not support the idea that children do not go to school to participate in things that can be addressed outside of school, & # 39; he said last December.

& # 39; We do not support our schools being turned into parliaments. What we want is to learn more in schools and less activism in schools. & # 39;

Instead of discouraging the students, Mr. Morrison's remarks attracted more the cause of the strike, which was upset because their concerns were rejected.

& # 39; I never thought it would be this fast, & # 39; Harriet admitted.

& # 39; We grew up thinking that no one else cared for us and heard politicians least affected by climate change say they won't do anything.

& # 39; The strike made me realize that people care and this movement brings them together. & # 39;

Harriet said she spent a lot of time on her climate efforts and skipped class every Friday in the run-up to the elections

Harriet said she spent a lot of time on her climate efforts and skipped class every Friday in the run-up to the elections

Harriet said she spent a lot of time on her climate efforts and skipped class every Friday in the run-up to the elections

Advertisements
The demonstration is the largest climate mobilization in the country's history, with no fewer than 100,000 demonstrators taking to the streets in Melbourne to demand change

The demonstration is the largest climate mobilization in the country's history, with no fewer than 100,000 demonstrators taking to the streets in Melbourne to demand change

The demonstration is the largest climate mobilization in the country's history, with no fewer than 100,000 demonstrators taking to the streets in Melbourne to demand change

. (TagsToTranslate) Dailymail (t) news (t) donald-trump (t) climate change – & – global-warming

- Advertisement -