The State Department complained about the Havana syndrome reaction, with diplomats too afraid to apply

The United States. The State Department has been criticized for its “lukewarm” response in its investigation of “Havana Syndrome,” which left about 100 CIA officers and family members, and about 200 U.S. officials sick with a mysterious array of ailments, including migraines and vertigo. .

Dozens of US diplomats and other officials, including CIA officers, have been affected by “Havana syndrome,” so named because it was first reported by officials assigned to the US embassy in Cuba.

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in June that a government-wide investigation is underway into who or what caused the suspected radio frequency attacks that were “targeted” at diplomats.

The diseases have been dubbed ‘Havana syndrome’ after US diplomats were first targeted in Havana, Cuba

Since it was first reported in 2016, about 200 US diplomats, intelligence officers and others have experienced symptoms consistent with ‘Havana syndrome’

Since US President Joe Biden took office in January, about two dozen intelligence officers, diplomats and other officials in Vienna have reported symptoms similar to those of Havana syndrome, making it the second largest hot spot after Havana, but so far is the feeling that the State Department has been ‘lazy’ in continuing the investigation.

The lackluster response is now causing some diplomats to avoid transitioning to new posts around the world.

Some foreign service officers have decided not to take jobs abroad because they fear they could become the next target of “Havana Syndrome,” the report said. cnn.

“For the most part, we don’t know anything other than what’s in the press,” a US diplomat told the network. “It’s hard for people to make informed decisions about where to serve.”

As early as 2014, the National Security Agency (NSA) said in a memo to an intelligence officer that he had had possible symptoms that an undisclosed “hostile country” the official traveled to in the late 1990s had a “powerful microwave system.” weapon that can weaken, intimidate, or kill an enemy over time and leave no evidence behind.’

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in June that a government-wide investigation is underway into who or what caused the suspected radio frequency attacks that were

US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said in June that a government-wide investigation is underway into who or what caused the suspected radio frequency attacks that were “targeted” at diplomats.

The weapon believed to cause Havana syndrome is said to be a smaller version of this 1990s Soviet microwave generator preserved at the University of New Mexico

The weapon believed to cause Havana syndrome is said to be a smaller version of this 1990s Soviet microwave generator preserved at the University of New Mexico

The memo said intelligence indicated such a weapon was “designed to bathe a target’s living quarters in microwaves, causing numerous physical effects, including a damaged nervous system.”

Seven years later, the State Department’s approach still seemed very “off”, despite Blinken’s promise to open an investigation and meet with all the Foreign Office victims.

The suspected targeted-energy attacks have baffled American researchers who have been trying to pinpoint who and what are causing them since they first started in Cuba.

In May, reports emerged that some US officials suspect Russia’s infamous foreign intelligence agency — the GRU — could be the culprit.

A US military officer based in a country with a large Russian presence also says he felt his head might explode during an incident in which he was found to have been near a GRU vehicle.

Marc Polymeropoulos, a 26-year-old CIA veteran who was diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury after visiting Russia in 2017

Marc Polymeropoulos, a 26-year-old CIA veteran who was diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury after visiting Russia in 2017

Diplomat Mark Lenzi, 45, pictured, was stationed in Guangzhou in 2017 when he developed unexplained symptoms including headaches, memory loss and trouble sleeping

His neighbor Catherine Werner, right, also fell ill

Diplomat Mark Lenzi, 45, left, was stationed in Guangzhou in 2017 when he developed unexplained symptoms, including headaches, memory loss and trouble sleeping. His neighbor Catherine Werner, right, also fell ill

Matthew Pottinger, pictured, another former deputy national security adviser, said: 'This is the Russian MO'

Matthew Pottinger, pictured, another former deputy national security adviser, said: ‘This is the Russian MO’

What is the ‘Havana Syndrome’?

The problem has been dubbed the “Havana syndrome” because the first cases hit US embassy staff in Cuba in 2016.

According to a US defense official who was not authorized to discuss details publicly, at least 130 cases are now under investigation across the administration, up from several dozen last year. The National Security Council is leading the investigation.

People believed to be affected have reported headaches, dizziness and symptoms consistent with concussions, with some requiring months of medical treatment. Some have reported hearing a loud noise before symptoms suddenly started.

Investigators believe there are at least four cases involving Trump White House officials.

Supporters of those affected accuse the US government of failing to take the problem seriously or provide necessary medical care and benefits.

US senators last month said the government is investigating an apparent increase in mysterious directed-energy attacks.

Symptoms include;

-hearing loss

-severe headache

-memory problems

-dizziness

-brain damage

Last month, Marc Polymeropolous, a former CIA officer and veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, claimed he was zapped by one of the attacks while visiting a hotel room in Moscow in 2017, accusing him of destroying his career as well as debilitating headaches where he still suffers from.

In October last year, it was reported how diplomat Mark Lenzi, 45, was stationed in Guangzhou, China, in 2017 when he developed unexplained symptoms, including headaches, memory loss and trouble sleeping.

His neighbor Catherine Werner also fell ill and fellow US official Robyn Garfield was evacuated from Shanghai with his family in June 2018.

Charles Kupperman, former deputy national security adviser, and John Bolton, Trump’s national security adviser, both believe the syndrome is real, The New Yorker reports.

Matthew Pottinger, another former deputy national security adviser, said: ‘This is the Russian MO’

A senior National Security Council official who fell near the White House said he took a taxi to the hospital where he was told he may have had a “massive migraine.”

Later he was approached by a colleague, who told him about the so-called ‘Havana Syndrome’.

The Biden administration is under new pressure to solve the mystery, with lawmakers from both sides, as well as those suspected of being affected, asking for answers.

But scientists and government officials aren’t sure yet who is behind any attacks, whether the symptoms could have been unintentionally caused by surveillance equipment — or if the incidents were actually attacks.

Whatever an official review concludes can have huge consequences.

People believed to be affected have reported headaches, dizziness and symptoms consistent with concussions, with some requiring months of medical treatment. Some have reported hearing a loud noise before symptoms suddenly started.

Diplomats say they are not given even the most basic information, such as the number of victims or the locations of such ‘attacks’.

Diplomats want to know what measures the State Department is introducing to prevent families from returning to apartment or office buildings where incidents have been reported in the past.

The US Embassy in Havana, Cuba.  The problem has been labeled 'Havana syndrome' as the first cases hit embassy staff in 2016, pictured

The US Embassy in Havana, Cuba. The problem has been labeled ‘Havana syndrome’ as the first cases hit embassy staff in 2016, pictured

There are also concerns about what the department is doing to ensure that they and their families are not returned to buildings or apartments where health incidents have previously been reported.

State Department officials say it’s about balancing concerns about data sharing about the incidents, while also avoiding scare tactics and exaggerating the issue.

The complete lack of information other than what has been reported in the press has led to rumors that as jobs abroad become vacant, diplomats are trying to find out if the vacancy was the result of a medical problem such as “Havana Syndrome.”

“If you go to a high-threat post, you know that diplomatic security will keep you informed of what the threats are and that they will take all possible steps to contain those threats. In this situation, the threat is not clear and neither is mitigation,” said a second diplomat.

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