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The star of CES 2020 is a piece of wood covered with a thin layer of LED lighting

The world’s first smart wooden STICK debut at CES that allows parents to track the length of their children and scribble children on the wall without leaving a trace

  • Pillar Memory is a wooden beam with a thin layer of LED lighting and touch sensors
  • Owners use a digital pen to draw on the wood, which is then stored in the cloud
  • It is designed for parents to keep track of their children’s height as they grow
  • The lines fade after a few seconds, but are included in the cloud storage

The ‘wooden first’ smart wooden stick aims to restore the old-fashioned tradition of marking children’s heights on the wall.

The Pillar Memory, demonstrated at CES 2020 in Las Vegas, is a wooden pole with a thin layer of white LED lighting and capacitive touch sensors.

Users write directly on the board using digital pens to create soft white LED-lit lines that record the length of a child.

The lines fade after a few seconds, but are included in cloud storage via a Wi-Fi receiver that comes embedded in the wooden pole, according to Gizmodo.

Pillar Memory is a new collaboration between the Japanese startup Mui Lab and graphic design supplier Wacom, with which people can use a digital pen to make LED drawings on a specially designed wooden pole

Pillar Memory is a new collaboration between the Japanese startup Mui Lab and graphic design supplier Wacom, with which people can use a digital pen to make LED drawings on a specially designed wooden pole

The device is designed in collaboration between the graphic design supplier Wacom and the Japanese smart home startup Mui Lab Inc.

It comes with a storage system that tracks length data and can be used by multiple people, so that the entire family can chart their relative growth.

Young children can also scribble directly on the wooden pole with the digital pens.

The markers disappear a few seconds after they get bored, but they can also be stored in cloud storage and later retrieved as part of a digital scrapbook.

With the pillar memory, users can also draw on the wood or write short messages for each other, which can be stored in cloud storage for later retrieval

With the pillar memory, users can also draw on the wood or write short messages for each other, which can be stored in cloud storage for later retrieval

With the pillar memory, users can also draw on the wood or write short messages for each other, which can be stored in cloud storage for later retrieval

The digital pens, designed by Wacom, come in three options modeled on natural materials: wood, chalk and charcoal

The digital pens, designed by Wacom, come in three options modeled on natural materials: wood, chalk and charcoal

The digital pens, designed by Wacom, come in three options modeled on natural materials: wood, chalk and charcoal

The digital pens are developed by Wacom and come with three different ‘coats’ intended to resemble natural materials that are traditionally used for drawing: chalk, charcoal and wood.

The Pillar Memory is part of the larger project of Mui Lab to make technology feel more natural and less intrusive in daily life.

The company wants to create devices that are “cherished by human wealth” and “emphasize the traditional customs and habits that are often lost in the midst of technological progress.”

Last year, the company unveiled a smart home hub built in the same way around a piece of wood that used the same inconspicuous LED technology to display weather information, incoming text messages and reminders for upcoming appointments.

That device also comes with a built-in speaker and Bluetooth receiver and can be used as an interface for Google Assistant, Sonos, with a number of other smart home products, including Sonos, and Philips Hue light bulb system.

“Technology is indispensable,” said Kaz Oki, co-founder in a promotional video for the company, “but we think that by making technology invisible, we can make the quality of our time more satisfying,”

Mui Lab wants to create new use of technology that encourages its users to “cherish human wealth”

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