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Ines Geipel, then known as Ines Schmidt, steams for Alice Brown of the USA in the 100 m sprint at the ASV Sportfest in Cologne in 1982

The abdominal muscles of Ines Geipel had been torn apart by Stasi surgeons just five years earlier when, in 1989, she bravely crawled across the Austrian border for freedom.

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Because a 23-year-old Geipel was destined for Soviet stardom, her body full of performance-enhancing drugs, she was taken to Mexico to train for the 1984 Olympics in Los Angeles.

But when the Stasi heard that she was planning to run away with a Mexican athlete and escape the US games, she was brought back to East Germany to be maimed.

& # 39; It has been a long time since 30 years since the fall of the Berlin Wall, but they have not solved anything & # 39 ;, said Geipel The times. & # 39; The West has not taken it seriously. We always let things go. & # 39;

Ines Geipel, then known as Ines Schmidt, steams for Alice Brown of the USA in the 100 m sprint at the ASV Sportfest in Cologne in 1982

Ines Geipel, then known as Ines Schmidt, steams for Alice Brown of the USA in the 100 m sprint at the ASV Sportfest in Cologne in 1982

Ines Geipel participates in the ASV Sportfest 1982 and was pumped with performance enhancing drugs from an early age to fully prepare her for the Olympic Games

Ines Geipel participates in the ASV Sportfest 1982 and was pumped with performance enhancing drugs from an early age to fully prepare her for the Olympic Games

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Ines Geipel participates in the ASV Sportfest 1982 and was pumped with performance enhancing drugs from an early age to fully prepare her for the Olympic Games

& # 39; It has been a long time ago, 30 years, since the fall of the Berlin Wall, but they haven't solved anything, & # 39 ;, Geipel told The Times. & # 39; The West has not taken it seriously. We always just let things go & # 39;

& # 39; It has been a long time ago, 30 years, since the fall of the Berlin Wall, but they haven't solved anything, & # 39 ;, Geipel told The Times. & # 39; The West has not taken it seriously. We always just let things go & # 39;

& # 39; It has been a long time ago, 30 years, since the fall of the Berlin Wall, but they haven't solved anything, & # 39 ;, Geipel told The Times. & # 39; The West has not taken it seriously. We always just let things go & # 39;

She was born in Dresden in 1960, a year before the Berlin Wall went up, her father was a Stasi spy and she was sent to a Soviet boarding school in Thuringia at the age of 14.

There she started running and when she was in her late teens, Geipel got a lot of pills and & # 39; vitamin drink & # 39; for the first time. when she started running faster than ever.

The doctors sometimes drew such amounts of blood that her limbs would turn blue, Geipel told The Times.

But while her walking speed galloped, her faith in communism faltered.

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Geipel had broken a 42.2-second word record at the club level in the 4x100m relay in June 1984 and was then sent to prepare for the Olympics.

Professor Geipel, 59, is the author of 21 books, most of which focused on performance-enhancing drugs given to athletes under the East German regime

Professor Geipel, 59, is the author of 21 books, most of which focused on performance-enhancing drugs given to athletes under the East German regime

Professor Geipel, 59, is the author of 21 books, most of which focused on performance-enhancing drugs given to athletes under the East German regime

She fell in love with a Mexican athlete during training for the games and planned her escape in the United States.

But the Stasi discovered her conspiracy and was taken back to East Germany, where a surgeon, commissioned by the state, opened her belly and tore her muscles – "to put her on ice for a long time," the secret police in their data.

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Geipel was forced to give up athletics and went to study at Jena University, but she was deported because she had hung up posters against Tiananmen Square.

& # 39; It was clear that I could not do a job that matched my qualifications, & # 39; she told The Times, & # 39; I was frozen on political grounds. & # 39;

In the summer of 1989, Hungary had recently moved to democracy and opened its Austrian border to all East Germans who were willing to escape. Many of the border guards remained loyal to communism.

Geipel told The Times: & We would always look at the cards … (but) everyone was very scared.

& # 39; When you met (with other East Germans) there was so much tension: you wanted to do it, but you couldn't talk about it because of the danger. So many people were shot on the Hungarian border that summer. & # 39;

Ines Geipel and subsequently Ines Schmidt (far left) compete for SC Motor Jena in the seventies in East Germany
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Ines Geipel and subsequently Ines Schmidt (far left) compete for SC Motor Jena in the seventies in East Germany

Ines Geipel and subsequently Ines Schmidt (far left) compete for SC Motor Jena in the seventies in East Germany

Geipel at the ASV-Sportfest competition in Cologne in 1982, two years later she was mutilated by the Stasi and her career ended

Geipel at the ASV-Sportfest competition in Cologne in 1982, two years later she was mutilated by the Stasi and her career ended

Geipel at the ASV-Sportfest competition in Cologne in 1982, two years later she was mutilated by the Stasi and her career ended

She went to stay with a friend in Budapest and in August she took the train to a border village.

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Geipel waited in fields until night fell, and then began to crawl on her stomach to Austria.

When daylight broke, she hurried to a nearby church where the pastor fed her and let her sleep.

And the next day a car arrived from the West German embassy in Vienna to pick it up and take it to a refugee facility in Munster.

Only two months later the Berlin Wall fell, but Geipel said she was relieved not to have been in DDR when the state fell apart.

After that she was able to continue her studies, qualifying with a master's degree at the Technical University of Darmstadt, later in a teacher position in Berlin.

Professor Geipel, 59, is the author of 21 books, most focused on performance-enhancing drugs that are given to athletes and other victims of the East German regime.

She told The Times that she believes there is a & # 39; toxic silence & # 39; is about the crimes committed in East Germany.

German former athletics and author Ines Geipel speaks at the Frankfurt Book Fair

German former athletics and author Ines Geipel speaks at the Frankfurt Book Fair

German former athletics and author Ines Geipel speaks at the Frankfurt Book Fair

Happy Berliners sit on the Berlin Wall in November 1989 after the border was reopened

Happy Berliners sit on the Berlin Wall in November 1989 after the border was reopened

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Happy Berliners sit on the Berlin Wall in November 1989 after the border was reopened

Geipel believes that those who participated and lived by the GDR still had to confront their past, just like those from West Germany had to undergo their complicity in Nazi crimes.

Crimes in the East, she says, have been watered down because they are compared to those in the Third Reich, but this does not say the academic is sufficient to tackle the legacy of the victims.

& # 39; We have such huge groups of victims to think about, and yet we always pretend that it's nothing & # 39 ;, she told The Times.

Events that led to the fall of the Berlin Wall in November 1989:

January 19, 1989: East German leader Erich Honecker says that the Berlin Wall & # 39; still exists in 50 and even in 100 years, if the reasons are not removed & # 39 ;.

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February 5: 20-year-old Chris Gueffroy is shot dead while trying to cross the Berlin border. He is the last person to be killed at the wall.

May 2: Hungarian border guards begin to remove border reinforcements and barbed wire on the border of the country with Austria, the first crack in the Iron Curtain that separated the east and west of Europe.

May 7: Local elections are held in East Germany. Opposition representatives report that the number of & # 39; no & # 39; votes against the country's communist rulers is not reflected in official results.

West Berliners crowded in front of the Berlin wall early November 11, 1989 as they watched East German border guards demolish part of the wall to open a new intersection between East and West Berlin, near Potsdamer square

West Berliners crowded in front of the Berlin wall early November 11, 1989 as they watched East German border guards demolish part of the wall to open a new intersection between East and West Berlin, near Potsdamer square

West Berliners crowded in front of the Berlin wall early November 11, 1989 as they watched East German border guards demolish part of the wall to open a new intersection between East and West Berlin, near Potsdamer square

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August 19: Hundreds of East Germans benefit from a & # 39; Pan-European picnic & # 39; organized by Hungarian opposition members near the Austrian border to escape to the west.

September 4: The first of what will be weekly Monday demonstrations for freedom of assembly and travel is held in Leipzig.

September 11: Hungary allows East Germans to cross the border with Austria and open the road to the West for tens of thousands.

September 12: Tadeusz Mazowiecki becomes Poland's first non-communist prime minister since World War II.

September 30: Nearly 6,000 East Germans locked in the West German Embassy in Prague are allowed to leave for the West.

October 3: East Germany stops visa-free travel to Czechoslovakia to prevent an exodus of its citizens.

October 7: East Germany celebrates its 40th anniversary and a visit to Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev urges his leadership to reform. Authorities connect Protestants.

October 18: Honecker is removed as East German leader after 18 years in power, replaced by Egon Krenz.

November 4: About 500,000 people gather at the central Alexanderplatz in East Berlin for the largest pro-democracy protest in the country.

People from East Germany greet citizens of West Germany at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on December 22, 1989

People from East Germany greet citizens of West Germany at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on December 22, 1989

People from East Germany greet citizens of West Germany at the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on December 22, 1989

November 9: East Germany opens its heavily fortified border after 28 years. In the following weeks and months, people break away from the barrier.

December 3: Krenz and the East German police station resign. Krenz steps down as the country's leader three days later, leaving moderate Moderist Hans Modrow in charge of East Germany.

December 22: A new border crossing opens at the Brandenburg Gate, the symbol of the German Cold War division.

March 18, 1990: the first democratic elections in East Germany. Middle-right candidate Lothar de Maiziere becomes prime minister.

October 3: Germany is reunited after four decades of Cold War division.

Reporting by AP

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