The sons of Robert Maxwell reveal that he planned to meet with the Bank of England on the day of his death

Media mogul Robert Maxwell died in 1991 after falling to the Atlantic while on his yacht in the Caribbean

Media tycoon Robert Maxell had a massive dispute with his son and was scheduled to meet with the Bank of England the same day his body was found floating in the Atlantic, his children said.

Speaking in an exclusive interview with the Sunday Times, Kevin and Ian Maxwell said they do not believe his father's death was a suicide despite the conspiracy theories surrounding him.

According to Kevin, he and Maxwell had participated in a shouting match the day he died at a "doomsday" meeting with the Bank of England that was going to take place that day.

"In 27 years, I have never speculated: was he killed or committed suicide?" Kevin said: "If I say something about it, I think it is very unlikely that he would have taken his life, it was not in his composition or in his mentality.

Media mogul Robert Maxwell died in 1991 after falling to the Atlantic while on his yacht in the Caribbean

Media mogul Robert Maxwell died in 1991 after falling to the Atlantic while on his yacht in the Caribbean

The children Ian and Kevin, in the photo after receiving the verdict in 1992, were declared innocent of conspiracy to defraud the pensioners after a trial of eight weeks

The children Ian and Kevin, in the photo after receiving the verdict in 1992, were declared innocent of conspiracy to defraud the pensioners after a trial of eight weeks

The children Ian and Kevin, in the photo after receiving the verdict in 1992, were declared innocent of conspiracy to defraud the pensioners after a trial of eight weeks

"I do not think any murder conspiracy stands up, so for me, it's an inexplicable accident and I'm happy to live with that."

It was said that Maxwell had been under pressure to explain the precarious financial situation of two of his companies, Maxwell Communications Corporation (MCC) and holdings of the Mirror Group, at the time of his death in November 1991.

Maxwell had obtained two loans from the Goldman Sachs bank, one for £ 20m and another for £ 30m, which he had not been able to pay despite the extensions and warnings.

Then, the bank began to sell the Mirror group and the MCC shares it had as collateral and the massive sale had to be announced publicly in a matter of days.

Maxwell's corpse was discovered hours after the news of the stock market crisis that had been lost on his yacht that morning was known.

Three pathologists who examined his body could not agree on how he died, although a subsequent investigation determined that he had suffered a heart attack and accidentally drowned after falling overboard.

After his death, it emerged that Maxwell had stormed £ 460 million from the pension fund Mirror Group

After his death, it emerged that Maxwell had stormed £ 460 million from the pension fund Mirror Group

After his death, it emerged that Maxwell had stormed £ 460 million from the pension fund Mirror Group

An investigation into his death revealed that Maxwell died after suffering a heart attack and drowned having fallen to the sea from Lady Ghislane (pictured)

An investigation into his death revealed that Maxwell died after suffering a heart attack and drowned having fallen to the sea from Lady Ghislane (pictured)

An investigation into his death revealed that Maxwell died after suffering a heart attack and drowned having fallen to the sea from Lady Ghislane (pictured)

Following his death, it was learned that Maxwell had taken £ 460 million from the Mirror Group pension fund and that his two sons Kevin and Ian were arrested and charged with conspiracy to defraud pensioners.

After a long and traumatic eight-month trial, the couple was finally declared innocent and Kevin Maxwell became the biggest personal bankruptcy in Britain at the age of 33.

The theft of pension funds left 32,000 members facing years of stress before the fund was completed by a consortium of the City.

It was said that Kevin was closer to the company's finances and knew that Maxwell had been using the pension fund.

"I always accepted that it was right that there should be a trial," said Kevin, "personally I did not handle the conflict of interest between family loyalty and duty with all other stakeholders, including retirees, so, of course, it was a case to answer. "

In its heyday, Robert Maxwell's media empire included Mirror, The People and the New York Daily News, as well as several other businesses. He was 68 years old at the time of his death in 1991.

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