The smell of SWEAT for new mothers helps their partners to bond with babies, researchers reveal

The smell of SWEAT for new mothers helps their partners to bond with their babies & become better fathers, researchers reveal

  • Men who have had a sweat from a woman who recently gave birth are thought to be more interested in their babies.
  • Believed body odor can cause psychological and behavioral changes
  • New evidence comes from researchers from the universities of Newcastle and Stirling

New mothers may emit a scent that helps their partners attach to their baby, researchers have revealed.

Scientists from the universities of Newcastle and Stirling claim that the scent of a woman can & # 39; hijack the senses of a man & # 39; to make it a better father.

The study recruited 55 men to sniff sweat samples from cotton pads attached to women's clothing, some of whom had given birth in the last six to ten months.

Researchers claim that new mothers can give off a scent that helps their partners attach to their baby according to a new study of men's psychological behavior (stock photo)

Researchers claim that new mothers can give off a scent that helps their partners attach to their baby according to a new study of men's psychological behavior (stock photo)

Five more women, who were childless and who used hormonal contraception, also provided odor samples for the study.

The men were then divided into three groups, two to smell the different scents and the third without smell.

After sniffing the pads repeatedly over a ten-minute period, the men completed a computer task by looking at the faces of men, women, and babies and they could choose how long they viewed each photo.

Men exposed to odors after pregnancy chose to look at the baby's faces longer than the men in the other groups, the researchers found.

Men exposed to odors after pregnancy chose to look at the baby's faces longer than the men in the other groups, the researchers found (stock photo)

Men exposed to odors after pregnancy chose to look at the baby's faces longer than the men in the other groups, the researchers found (stock photo)

Men exposed to odors after pregnancy chose to look at the baby's faces longer than the men in the other groups, the researchers found (stock photo)

& # 39; Our findings can be seen as the first evidence that a short exposure to body odor after pregnancy is sufficient to cause psychological and behavioral changes with regard to baby care & # 39 ;, said researchers at Newcastle University and Stirling University.

Caroline Allen, from the University of Newcastle, said men can respond to the odors after pregnancy because it has increased the chances of their baby's survival.

& # 39; Of course we have many babies & # 39; s well educated in single-parent families these days, but since our ancestors had two parents to look after a child, this would have been important to improve their chances of survival, & # 39; she said.

The findings are in line with earlier research showing that testosterone levels decrease among new fathers who participate in the upbringing of children and that they are more attuned to indications such as the cry of a baby.

Instead of looking deep into the eyes of their romantic love, researchers discovered that the men had clearly focused their attention on the next generation.

The latest research was published in the journal Physiology & Behavior.

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