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The single JP Rosenbaum says that he “progresses” after a shock diagnosis

Bachelorette alum JP Rosenbaum has made progress that he says is “slow” but is better than his physical therapist expected only three weeks after his shock diagnosis with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

“I am very lucky that three weeks later I can do things that I should not be able to do,” Rosenbaum told his therapist.

His update to the Instagram story, published on Tuesday, revealed that Rosenbaum regained most of his motor skills after his rare autoimmune disease partially paralyzed him last month.

Rosenbaum seemed hopeful that, like most Guillain-Barré patients, he would regain full function, but it is too early to say whether his full recovery will take months or years – whether he will ever be completely free of weakness or tingling in his limbs.

This is a rare condition where the body's immune system attacks the peripheral nervous system and causes paralysis. Pictured: Rosebaum in the hospital when he announced the diagnosis

This is a rare condition where the body's immune system attacks the peripheral nervous system and causes paralysis. Pictured: Rosebaum in the hospital when he announced the diagnosis

JP Rosenbaum has announced on Instagram on Tuesday that he is making “slow progress” in his recovery from Guillain-Barré syndrome (left). This is a rare condition where the body’s immune system attacks the peripheral nervous system and causes paralysis. Pictured left: Rosebaum in the hospital, when he announced the diagnosis

“This Monday was three weeks ago since I was released from the hospital and I am slowly recovering every few days,” said Rosenbaum.

Rosenbaum – who is married to bachelor Ashley Hebert Rosenbaum – did not reveal how or when his symptoms first started, but for most Guillain-Barré patients, the condition starts with muscle weakness, often after a viral infection.

In mid-December, the reality star on Instagram announced from his hospital bed that he had been diagnosed with the rare condition where the immune system is attacking the peripheral nervous system.

As a result, parts of the body – or in some cases the entire body – are paralyzed.

The condition is rare and affects around one in every 100,000.

According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, fewer than 20,000 cases are diagnosed each year.

After the first symptoms of Guillain-Barré, the patients’ disorders usually worsen about two weeks before falling around four weeks.

Rosenbaum said until recently that he was unable to do daily activities such as tying his shackles or picking up his children. Pictured: Rosenbaum, left, and wife Ashley Hebert Rosenbaum in October

Rosenbaum said until recently that he was unable to do daily activities such as tying his shackles or picking up his children. Pictured: Rosenbaum, left, and wife Ashley Hebert Rosenbaum in October

Rosenbaum said until recently that he was unable to do daily activities such as tying his shackles or picking up his children. Pictured: Rosenbaum, left, and wife Ashley Hebert Rosenbaum in October

The recovery period can only last a few weeks and a few years, but about 30 percent of the diagnosed patients have a residual weakness after three years.

Most with Guillain-Barré fully recover, but some continue to tingle in the arms and legs.

By the time Rosenbaum announced his condition, his symptoms had leveled.

“I feel pretty much the same as the whole day, which I think is a good sign,” he said in one of the clips.

“From what I’ve been told, my symptoms have hopefully subsided and not gotten worse, and hopefully I’m on my way to recovery.”

Since then, he has started Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy (IVIG), a blood transfusion treatment that is used to address problems with the immune system, including leukemia, and Guillain-Barré.

Rosenbaum said he is slowly advancing, but exceeds the expectations of his therapists. Pictured: Rosenbaum, far left, with Herbert Rosenbaum, second from the right, and their two children

Rosenbaum said he is slowly advancing, but exceeds the expectations of his therapists. Pictured: Rosenbaum, far left, with Herbert Rosenbaum, second from the right, and their two children

Rosenbaum said he is slowly advancing, but exceeds the expectations of his therapists. Pictured: Rosenbaum, far left, with Herbert Rosenbaum, second from the right, and their two children

Rosenbaum and his wife, Ashley Herbert Rosenbaum, met in season 7 of The Bachelorette in 2011 (photo, the final) and got married in December 2012

Rosenbaum and his wife, Ashley Herbert Rosenbaum, met in season 7 of The Bachelorette in 2011 (photo, the final) and got married in December 2012

Rosenbaum and his wife, Ashley Herbert Rosenbaum, met in season 7 of The Bachelorette in 2011 (photo, the final) and got married in December 2012

The next step was to start regaining strength and coordination.

“I did a lot of physical and occupational therapy,” Rosenbaum said in his Instagram story.

“I was even able to leave for a week in Maine to visit my in-laws.”

Previously, Rosenbaum had regretted what a fight was every day, such as tying his shoes.

“I’m slowly getting better every few days,” he said.

He called the steps he took “incredible” and said that almost all of his fine motor skills have returned.

In a series of videos via his Instagram stories on Sunday, Rosenbaum explained how the syndrome had already affected his daily life.

“Things you do every day, like picking up this phone, or tying buttons, tying shoelaces, putting on deodorants, it’s just not possible,” he said.

In those who have Guillain-Barré, the immune system produces harmful antibodies that attack the nerves.

The couple met and fell in love during the filming of season 7 of The Bachelorette in 2011.

They married in December 2012 during a television ceremony and have two children, son Fordham Rhys, five and daughter Essex Rose, three.

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