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The serious crime increases by 22% in New York City, while the police blame the bail reforms

New York City saw a large increase in crime last month compared to the same period in 2019.

Major crimes, according to the NYPD in February, grew by 22.5% with a 7.1% increase in shootings. theft, assault, burglary, major larceny and major larceny car crimes.

However, murders fell around 20% with 20 people killed in the Big Apple in February.

According to the police, recent criminal justice reforms blame the increase in crime Fox5.

Rape cases also decreased with 125 rapes reported in February 2020 and 133 in February 2019.

New York City police chief Dermot Shea, center left, speaks with Mayor Bill de Blasio, center right, during a press conference on New York crime figures

New York City police chief Dermot Shea, center left, speaks with Mayor Bill de Blasio, center right, during a press conference on New York crime figures

NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago. The number of shootings had increased by 7.1 percent. 16,343 major crimes were reported in the first two months of 2020 compared to 13,648 over the same period in 2019 - an increase of 2,695

NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago. The number of shootings had increased by 7.1 percent. 16,343 major crimes were reported in the first two months of 2020 compared to 13,648 over the same period in 2019 - an increase of 2,695

NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago. The number of shootings had increased by 7.1 percent. 16,343 major crimes were reported in the first two months of 2020 compared to 13,648 over the same period in 2019 – an increase of 2,695

During the first 58 days of 2020, 482 people who had already been arrested for committing a crime such as theft or burglary were again arrested for committing another 846 crimes.

35%, or 299 of them, were for arrests in seven major crime categories – murder, rape, theft, crime attack, burglary, grand larceny and grand larceny car.

The amount is threefold that of those who were committed in the same 58 days in 2019.

The city also saw a 7.1% increase in shooting incidents, from 42 compared to last year’s 45; Robberies rose 32.7 percent from 891 last year to 1,182 this year; attacks increased by 9.2 percent and burglaries increased by 19.1 percent; grand larceny increased by 23.9 percent and grand larceny jumped 61.6 percent automatically.

In February there were a total of 7,632 major crimes versus 6,228 major crimes in the same period last year.

Officials say that all suspects who were arrested would have ended up in jail prior to the new bail reform law.

“Reforms in criminal justice serve as an important reason why New York City has seen this increase in crime,” the NYPD said in a press release.

“All people were arrested for violations that could have ended up in prison before January 1 and bail reform,” the NYPD said.

“Each number represents a victim,” said NYPD Police Commissioner Dermot Shea. “We will continue to work with New Yorkers and our law enforcement partners to get the crime drivers under control and to offer justice to the victims.”

The NYPD says it is now reusing resources and increasing the number of car and foot patrols in areas that appear to see an increase in crime.

A number of police officers are being relocated from administrative roles to the street.

“Each number represents a victim,” said NYPD Police Commissioner Dermot Shea, left. “We will continue to work with New Yorkers and our law enforcement partners to get the crime drivers under control and to offer justice to the victims.” Mayor Bill de Blasio is seen well

New York City saw a significant increase in crime last month compared to February 2019. The NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago (photo of the file)

New York City saw a significant increase in crime last month compared to February 2019. The NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago (photo of the file)

New York City saw a significant increase in crime last month compared to February 2019. The NYPD said that serious crimes grew by 22.5% compared to a year ago (photo of the file)

“Although crime has a record number in New York City, there is more work to do to ensure that every New Yorker feels safe in their neighborhood. Mayor Bill de Blasio will continue to use precision police during a press conference with Shea to target enforcement and deepen our work with communities to fight crime.

The NYPD says that there seems to be a peak among young people who commit robberies against other young people.

The ministry wants to collaborate with other organizations to come up with a strategy to tackle the increasing juvenile crime.

NEW BORK’S BAIL REFORM: THE FACTS

On January 1, 2020, the state of New York introduced far-reaching criminal law, meaning that bail for most crimes and non-violent crimes, including theft, is no longer allowed.

Judges must now release persons charged with such crimes without bail.

The controversial new “no bail law” in New York is expected to limit the use of cash bail and pre-trial detention in an estimated 90 percent of arrests and strengthen measures to ensure a suspect’s right to a speedy trial.

The New York decision to reform its law saw the state join California and New Jersey – which already forbid cash bail for most crimes and non-violent crimes.

The ‘no-bail’ law has become entangled in controversy since it was enshrined in state law.

“New York is now the only state in the nation that requires judges to completely ignore the public security threat of accused persons in determining whether they hold them pending trial or impose conditions for their release,” said Shea in a main article for the New York Times in January. “It eliminates cash bail and the possibility of detention for a wide range of offenses, including gun ownership, trafficking in fentanyl and other drugs, many hate crime attacks, the promotion of child prostitution, serial arson and certain burglaries and robberies.”

Shea noted that while the NYPD strives for criminal justice and bail reform, current plans endanger witnesses and victims.

“Fewer people kept awaiting trial and the early release of the names and contact details of victims and witnesses – placing some of these victims and witnesses at the risk of intimidation or retaliation. Violent criminals are sent back to the community and know the names of their accusers and where they can be found. ”

There have been a number of high-profile issues in recent weeks.

One is a serial thief who has made 139 arrests in New York City for the pickpocketing of unsuspecting subway commuters. He even had the courage to thank the Democrats because bail reform enabled him to commit more crimes.

“I’m famous!” Said Charles Barry, 56 years old New York Daily News reporter outside of Manhattan Criminal Court last month after being released due to the new mild law.

Charles Barry, 56, is a serial thief who has been arrested 139 times by the New York police. He has served six stints in the state prison for non-violent crimes such as the sale of drugs and larceny

Charles Barry, 56, is a serial thief who has been arrested 139 times by the New York police. He has served six stints in the state prison for non-violent crimes such as the sale of drugs and larceny

Charles Barry, 56, is a serial thief who has been arrested 139 times by the New York police. He has served six stints in the state prison for non-violent crimes such as the sale of drugs and larceny

“I take $ 200, $ 300 a day out of your money, cracker! You can’t stop me! “

Barry has been arrested six times so far in 2020 – and each time he has been released without paying bail thanks to a new state law that came into force on January 1.

When the police led Barry out of a field after one arrest, he yelled at a reporter: “Bail reform, it’s enlightened!”

“They are the democrats! The Democrats know me and the Republicans fear me. “You can’t touch me! I can’t be stopped! ”

On two occasions he was arrested for stealing money from metro commuters who were buying Metrocards from the vending machines at the metro station.

On January 19, Barry reportedly stole $ 50 from a woman’s hand at West 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue subway stations near Manhattan’s Bryant Park. He was then given a ticket for the look of a desk because he had not shown up for a court hearing.

The arrests in 2020 are in addition to the 133 other arrests for crimes such as grand larceny, petty larceny and fraudulent charges.

The new law in New York State, passed after Democrats took control of the Albany legislature, requires that judges accuse those accused of crimes and non-violent crimes.

To ensure that those arrested return for their judicial dates, the court may impose non-monetary conditions, such as electronic supervision or release under supervision.

If someone is suspected of committing a violent crime and the judge is not convinced that he or she will appear before the date of his trial, the judge can impose bail.

Proponents of the reform say it is necessary to reduce the population in prison before the trial and to fight mass imprisonment.

Opponents say that repeat offenders can continue to use crime without a deterrent.

Since Barry’s crimes are considered nonviolent, judges are not allowed to send him to prison while his case is awaiting trial.

Critics of the bail law say that it must be adjusted so that judges have some freedom to impose bail on potentially dangerous suspects.

But supporters of the bail law accuse the NYPD of reinforcing Barry’s arrests to promote their agenda.

“We strongly oppose any change to the bail law as it is written,” said the Legal Aid Society.

The LAS, representing Barry, says it is no good putting him in prison.

In another case, a suspected drunk driver who was arrested for a fatal crash that killed a man bragged to the police while being held that one day he would be out of jail for new bail reform laws.

Jordan Randolph, 40, was actually released on bail the day after he was accused of a DWI crime over the January 12 crash in Long Island, New York, which killed 27-year-old Jonathan Flores-Maldonado.

Randolph is accused of trying to flee the scene on foot after crashing his car into the Flores-Maldonado vehicle.

Jordan Randolph, 40, was released on bail the day after he was accused of a DWI crime over the January 12 crash in Long Island, New York, in which 27-year-old Jonathan Flores-Maldonado was killed

Jordan Randolph, 40, was released on bail the day after he was accused of a DWI crime over the January 12 crash in Long Island, New York, in which 27-year-old Jonathan Flores-Maldonado was killed

Jordan Randolph, 40, was released on bail the day after he was accused of a DWI crime over the January 12 crash in Long Island, New York, in which 27-year-old Jonathan Flores-Maldonado was killed

Prosecutors say that while Randolph was handcuffed shortly after the crash, he bragged to the police that he would not be in jail for long due to new changes to bail law.

See you soon, January 1, the laws have changed. I’ll be gone tomorrow and I’ll find you, “Randolph would have told the officers.

At the time of the crash, Randolph had 12 previous criminal convictions since 2011, including three DWIs.

Jordan Randolph

Jordan Randolph

Jonathan Flores-Maldonado

Jonathan Flores-Maldonado

Randolph (left) was indicted in early January for a 24-count indictment in connection with the crash in which Flores-Maldonado (right) was killed, including manslaughter of vehicles

He was also arrested, but later released on New Year’s Day because he did not have a breathalyzer prescribed by the court in his vehicle.

Despite his earlier convictions, the judge was forced to release Randolph because of new controversial bail reform laws that eliminate pre-trial detention and bail for the majority of crime cases and non-violent crimes.

Flores-Maldonado’s mother, Lillian Flores, blames the new bail reform law for her son’s death.

She believes Randolph should not have been released after his arrest on New Year’s Day, given his earlier record. The family was also destroyed when Randolph was allowed to run free after the fatal crash.

In another case, a suspected serial bank robber who was released under the new bail reform carried out two further alleged robberies.

A robber depicted on January 3 at a Chase Bank in Manhattan was captured but then released

A robber depicted on January 3 at a Chase Bank in Manhattan was captured but then released

A robber depicted on January 3 at a Chase Bank in Manhattan was captured but then released

The same suspect, Gerod Woodberry, 42, is pictured in another security photo taken while allegedly committing a bank robbery on January 6

The same suspect, Gerod Woodberry, 42, is pictured in another security photo taken while allegedly committing a bank robbery on January 6

Gerod Woodberry, 42, allegedly committed four robberies in New York before he was arrested and brought to justice on January 9, who then had no choice but to release him under the reform of the law without bail

Gerod Woodberry, 42, committed four robberies in New York before being arrested and brought to justice on January 9, who then had no choice but to release him under the reform of the law without bail.

Hours after his release, the suspect went on to commit two more bank robberies before reporting to the police.

Woodberry has reportedly committed six robberies since December 30 and hit banks across Midtown Manhattan, Harlem, West Village and Upper West Side in New York.

On January 9, Woodberry was taken to a Manhattan Criminal Court judge for theft in four Chase locations in the city, where he had withdrawn about $ 2,000 in stolen cash.

Under the controversial New York “no-bail law” that requires no bond to accuse a suspect of non-violent crimes, including theft, Woodberry was allowed to roam free.

“I can’t believe they let me out,” he heard on the way out of the New York police headquarters, reports the New York Post.

“What did they think?” he added.

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