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The senator of the state of Vermont wants to turn anyone under 21 into a crime to have a cell phone

Vermont senator introduces bill to make it a CRIME for anyone under 21 to have a cell phone – punishable by a fine of $ 1,000 and up to a year in prison

  • A new bill in Vermont would classify the use of teenagers as a crime
  • Introduced by state senator John Rodgers, it would carry a fine of up to $ 1,000
  • People can also face as much as a year in prison if they are convicted
  • Rodgers points to a number of problems, including the threat of cyberbullying, political radicalization and the risk of car accidents during texting

Teenagers who own cell phones in Vermont can be banned if a new bill is passed at the Senate.

Called S.212, the bill would make it a crime for anyone under 21 to own or use a cell phone, with punishment including fines of up to $ 1,000 and imprisonment for up to one year.

The bill was introduced on Wednesday and referred to the Judiciary Commission for further assessment.

A new bill in Vermont would make it a crime for anyone under 21 to own or even use a cell phone, punishable by up to $ 1,000 in fines and a year in prison

A new bill in Vermont would make it a crime for anyone under 21 to own or even use a cell phone, punishable by up to $ 1,000 in fines and a year in prison

“Given the dangerous and life-threatening consequences of the use of mobile phones by young people, it is clear that people younger than 21 are not sufficiently mature to have them safely, just as the General Assembly has concluded that people younger than 21 years of age are not mature enough to own firearms, smoke cigarettes or consume alcohol, “the bill argues.

The bill points to a large number of issues to justify the ban, including the high number of teenage car accidents, cyberbullying, suicide and political extremism.

“The internet and social media, mainly accessible through mobile phones, are used to radicalize and recruit terrorists, fascists and other extremists,” the law continues.

“Mobile phones have often been used by mass shooters of a younger age for research into earlier recordings.”

The bill was introduced by John Rodgers, a democrat and former stonemason from the Essex-Orleans district in Northern Vermont, who was first elected in 2013.

S.212 was introduced by the State Senator John Rodgers of Vermont (pictured above) and was referred to the State Commission for Judiciary for further investigation

S.212 was introduced by the State Senator John Rodgers of Vermont (pictured above) and was referred to the State Commission for Judiciary for further investigation

S.212 was introduced by the State Senator John Rodgers of Vermont (pictured above) and was referred to the State Commission for Judiciary for further investigation

He had previously served in the House of Representatives for eight years and has also worked as a youth football coach.

Michelle Fay from the non-profit Voices for Vermont’s Children says the bill “feels like a reach” and distracts attention from more pressing political concerns.

“There are so many critical issues that affect the lives of working families in Vermont today, from raising the minimum wage to implementing equitable family and medical leave insurance programs to setting up a children’s lawyer office,” Fay said Times Argus.

Rodgers was elected to the Vermont Senate in 2013 after serving eight years in the House of Representatives. He has also worked as a stonemason and youth soccer coach

Rodgers was elected to the Vermont Senate in 2013 after serving eight years in the House of Representatives. He has also worked as a stonemason and youth soccer coach

Rodgers was elected to the Vermont Senate in 2013 after serving eight years in the House of Representatives. He has also worked as a stonemason and youth soccer coach

“We urge the legislator to focus on the important work that needs to be done instead of being stuck in hollow distractions.”

Strangely enough, even Rodgers admits that he probably has no chance of ever becoming a law.

“I have no delusions that it will pass,” said Rodgers. “I probably wouldn’t vote for it myself.”

HOW MANY SCREENTIME SHOULD TEENAGERS GET?

A recent survey by the State University of San Diego found that the happiest teenagers were those who limited their daily digital media time to just under two hours a day.

After this daily hour of screen time, the accident steadily increased with increasing screen time.

Looking at historical trends from the same age groups since the 1990s, the researchers found that the increase in screen equipment over time coincided with a general decrease in reported happiness among American teenagers.

Study participants born after 2000 were less satisfied with life, had lower self-esteem and were more unhappy than those who grew up in the 1990s.

Since 2012, the satisfaction, confidence and happiness of the average teenager has fallen sharply.

That year meant the point at which the proportion of Americans who had a smartphone for the first time rose above 50 percent.

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